marbury_knicks_v_cavs.jpgI don't know how to react to the news of Stephon Marbury wanting to finish his career in Italy, only to say... Please start your career here in the United States before you leave.

I have said this before and I will again, Marbury is the most talented specimen at point guard in the NBA. When I heard that comment about Italy, it just reinforced my thoughts on Marbury and that is he thinks of himself first and everyone else second when he opens his mouth. What about paying the league and the Knicks back for making you wealthy beyond your dreams? What about leaving a legacy in your own country before you go to another? When you were growing up in Coney Island, what was your dream? I assume it was playing for the Knicks. That should be your focus and nothing else, because I bet bottom dollar if the Knicks go deep in the playoffs in the next few years, Italy will not even cross your lips.

Marbury is not alone in this assessment. I am growing extremely tired of superstars who commanded and got a huge chunk of the salary cap wanting to change teams or, in Marbury's instance, looking forward to playing somewhere else. I wonder if they have realized the rainbow is not guaranteed to produce gold on the other end.

Stephon, your pot of gold is right there in New York. Now reward James Dolan and Isiah Thomas with a winning team because they have invested heavily in you. They surely do not want to hear about your future plans surrounded by your immediate thoughts on the Knicks.

I played in Europe and if you think they will accept a me-first attitude over there, please don't go. I guarantee you will find out what a heated up coin feels like when it connects with your head. Or rocks being thrown at your house after a huge loss or subpar effort and your kids trying to figure out why.

Steph, you have no clue what pressure is until you go play in Greece and the fans seem like they are in your shirt and smoke fills the arena from either flares being shot across the stadium or cigarettes.

I loved my experience in Greece and I would not trade it for nothing in the world, but it was the most pressure-packed nine months I have ever encountered in my life. I would have liked the idea of you going there out of college for a year or two and then we might be seeing the Starbury we know you can be.

So my advice to you is to finish what you started in your own country before you start looking somewhere else.