Aaron Gordon Rumors

All NBA Players

Aaron Gordon
Aaron Gordon
Position: F
Born: 09/16/95
Height: 6-9 / 2.06
Weight:212 lbs. / 96.2 kg.
Salary: $4,351,320
Video evidence over the past two seasons shows he’s comfortable taking the ball up the court, and his ball skills are good for his size, but they aren’t exceptional. His own forays to the rim can best be described as rustic. It’s something he’s confident he can do well, though he’s aware of the skepticism. “I pride myself on ballhandling and I’ll be able to show it this year,” Gordon said. “It’s just with being able to release pressure off Elfrid Payton and our other guards. Orlando’s using me as a big guard, and I’m excited to do that.“
Vogel: I think positions still matter in today’s NBA. But he’s comfortable playing both. You’re correct in your assessment that he’s going to be playing mostly small forward on this team. That’s something I’m excited about because I’ve always been able to build some really solid defenses, and the foundation of those teams was defensive length and athleticism. This is what we’re going to have with this club, with either Vuc or Bismack Biyombo at the five and Serge Ibaka at the four and Aaron Gordon at the three, you’ve got a really long, athletic front court, which I think is necessary if you want to be a great defensive team.
Jason Richardson on being one of the great dunkers in All-Star history: “I think my name is in there. I did some dunks that few had ever seen, I kind of brought the dunk contest back. I feel that because of the dunks I did and what I brought to the dunk contest, I’ll probably be remembered with those guys like Michael Jordan and Vince Carter, you know even Aaron Gordon and those guys that are being considered great dunkers also.”
Kennedy: The front office brought in a lot of veterans such as Ibaka, Biyombo, Green, D.J. Augustin and Jodie Meeks. What did you think of the additions? They’re clearly win-now moves. Aaron Gordon: “It’s just exciting to me. I’ve always trusted Rob Hennigan and I’ve always trusted Scott Perry. To me, it validates my trust in them. They made moves that other people couldn’t have made. They were confident, aggressive moves. Now, it’s on us. We’re ready to play. We have the coach, the staff, the players, the organization. We have a foundation of players who have been there and been through the losing, and now it’s time to start winning.”
Aaron Gordon: As a little kid, I’ve always wanted to be part of a dunk contest, and of course I’ve always wanted to be in the NBA dunk contest. I got that opportunity and I did the best that I could. To me, that was all of the validation that I needed. I set out to achieve a goal and I executed it. After that, people were saying that I’m one of the best dunkers in the NBA. For me, that was amazing and all I needed. I wanted people to see what I saw and, you know, they did. They saw the creativity, the innovation, the joy and how much I love the game come out through my dunks.” Kennedy: Are you going to do the dunk contest again this year? Aaron Gordon: “I’m not 100 percent sure. I kind of gave a lot in this last one and to be more creative would be difficult. I think I could do it, but I’m not sure if I’m going to.”
Storyline: All-Star Contests
Kennedy: One thing I find interesting is that you work with mental skills coach Graham Betchart on mindfulness training and you’ve been doing it since you were a kid. You guys even formed an organization and app called Lucid. I know you do things like breathing exercises, meditation, visualization, positive affirmations and things like that. How much has that benefited your game? Aaron Gordon: “I started working with Graham when I was going from eighth grade to ninth grade. I was basically going from being a big fish in a little pond to being a little fish in a big pond. I knew that I needed something to help my game and continue to keep me on the right track. Graham introduced this to me at 13 years old and from then on, the ball was just rolling. I think it’s helped me a tremendous amount. We use basketball as a medium, but we just talk about life. He’s also helped me with situations in my life that have nothing to do with basketball. We talk about money, materialistic things, existential things – some things that normal basketball players may not talk about with their sports psychologist. He’s become a mentor for me. He’s helped me see that there’s more to life than just basketball and I’m eternally grateful for that.”