Aaron Gordon Rumors

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Aaron Gordon
Aaron Gordon
Position: F
Born: 09/16/95
Height: 6-9 / 2.06
Weight:212 lbs. / 96.2 kg.
Salary: $4,171,680
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While James was a local basketball star in Akron, Ohio, at that time, he was largely unknown to the rest of the nation when he came to play in a tournament for the AAU Oakland Soldiers in 2000. The Soldiers were founded in 1990 in the Oakland suburb of Richmond. Twenty-five years later, it has now grown into an AAU powerhouse with alumni that include James, Chauncey Billups, Brandon Jennings, Leon Powe, Aaron Gordon, Chuck Hayes, Jabari Brown, Kendrick Perkins and Stanley Johnson. Fifteen years after first playing for the Soldiers, James returns to the Bay Area to lead his Cleveland Cavaliers against the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals. “It’s amazing because that part of his life he never talks about publicly,” Olivier said. “But I thought we had some good times and we still talk about it.”
Gordon will play for the Magic’s Orlando Pro Summer League team in early July. He’ll continue to work with Dave Love, the shooting coach, and team officials expect Gordon will be among the team’s most diligent workers this offseason. It would be smart to be patient with Gordon. The 2015-16 season will be Gordon’s Age-20 season. “There’s definitely improvement needed,” Gordon said. “But there’s no ceiling for me, and I can just mold into any shape or form that I want.”
He remembers his high school days like they were yesterday and he’s not old enough to legally drink or reserve many hotel rooms on his own. Yet, he’s viewed as a potential savior of a billion-dollar organization. That’s a lot of pressure for a kid and he admits he’s had to mature a lot faster than most of his peers – many of whom are still cramming for exams and trying to find their next party. “There are definitely some aspects that you need to mature quicker about – when it comes to money, when it comes to taking care of your body, when it comes to making good use of your time,” Gordon said. “But at the end of the day, I’m still a teenager. And I’m always going to be a kid at heart.”
Unable to move much while his fractured foot healed and away from his Orlando Magic teammates for most of six weeks, Aaron Gordon often would pass time by sitting in a chair and mimicking shooting basketballs against a wall. The goal for the 19-year-old Gordon – the youngest player in the NBA this season – was to put his time away from basketball to good use. When he was finally ready to return, Gordon wanted a shooting stroke that he worked on all summer to be perfected and ready to go. While there very well could still be some rust, Gordon has been cleared by doctors to play and he could be active tonight when the suddenly surging Magic (15-27) host the rugged Memphis Grizzlies (27-11) at the Amway Center. Tipoff is just after 7 p.m., and Gordon can hardly wait to get back out on the floor.
Orlando Magic forward Aaron Gordon underwent successful surgery on Friday in Charlotte – less than two miles away from where his teammates were facing the Charlotte Hornets – to repair the fractured fifth metatarsal in his left foot, GM Rob Hennigan announced. An X-ray following last Saturday’s game in Washington, D.C. revealed the fractured bone in Gordon’s left foot. Following a consultation with specialist Dr. Bob Anderson, surgery was performed on Friday in Charlotte at Carolinas Medical-Mercy Hospital. Gordon, the youngest player in the NBA this season at 19 years old, is out indefinitely. He will be re-evaluated by the specialist again in six-to-eight weeks to gauge the healing in the surgically repaired bone. His return to game action will ultimately depend on how he responds to rehabilitation.
After the Magic lost to the Washington Wizards on Saturday night, Gordon said, he told Magic athletic trainer Keon Weise that he needed new orthotics in his shoes. Weise insisted Gordon get his foot X-rayed, Gordon said. “It’s been sore,” Gordon said. “It’s been a sore foot. It didn’t really feel like much at all. . . . It was a little bit painful, but it wasn’t anything really at all.”