Bradley Beal Rumors

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Bradley Beal
Bradley Beal
Position: G
Born: 06/28/93
Height: 6-5 / 1.96
Weight:207 lbs. / 93.9 kg.
Salary: $5,694,673
Once the free-agent madness that kicks off today simmers down, the Wizards will have a week to figure out what to do regarding Bradley Beal who is eligible for an extension going into the last year of his rookie contract. “We have all the way to October to get something done on that front,” Wizards president Ernie Grunfeld told CSNwashington recently. “We’ll talk to his agent (Mark Bartelstein) at the appropriate time and see where that process takes us. Obviously, we think very highly of Bradley and we want him here for a very long time.”
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If the Wizards don’t do the extension this summer, Beal would have two options: Become a restricted free agent next summer (assuming the Wizards extend a qualifying offer, which of course they will), or sign his $7.5 million qualifying offer and become unrestricted in 2017. Wizards GM Ernie Grunfeld and Beal’s agent, Mark Bartelstein, have yet to initiate extension talks, but they will soon.
Two days after hitting a buzzer-beater to win Game 3, Washington’s Paul Pierce missed a 3-point attempt that would have tied the score coming out of a timeout with 9.5 seconds left. “Thought I got a great look,” Pierce said. Said Bradley Beal, who scored a career playoff-high 34 points for the Wizards: “I thought it was going in. … That open one’s always the hardest one to make.”
Korver was matched up with Beal for 9:32, and he was 1-for-4 for just three points, according to the NBA’s SportVU player tracking data. And consider that Beal is doing this after rolling his troublesome right ankle so badly in Game 1, when he led all scorers with 28 points, that he left the court in the fourth quarter in tears. And without John Wall, who fractured his left hand and wrist and has missed the last two games and is unlikely to play again this series. “Don’t let my face fool you now. It was tough,” said Beal of chasing around Korver after Game 2. “I was trying to do whatever I could. It wasn’t easy. A lot of treatment the last couple days but I was out there, no excuses.”
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Paul Pierce says the Toronto Raptors don’t scare them because they don’t have the “it” factor. Raptors big man Amir Johnson fires back. The Wizards take Game 1, 93-86. They then take a 60-49 lead into halftime in Toronto in Game 2, and Wizards guard Bradley Beal says this: “[The Raptors] think that we’re some punks. They think that they can push around. But we’re not rolling.”
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Bradley Beal started Game 1 against the Toronto Raptors nearly reduced to tears by an inspiring pregame speech from Washington Wizards coach Randy Wittman. “I almost cried,” Beal said. “Witt almost had me teary-eyed before the game. He said make sure you cherish each moment, because you never know, this may be your last game playing. He looked at Paul [Pierce] and said, ‘Paul, this may be your last time ever making it to the playoffs.'” “You have to embrace each moment that you are out here on the floor and live in each moment each and every second.”
Washington Wizards guard Bradley Beal, who played for Billy Donovan at Florida, thinks that his former college coach will make the jump to the NBA. Beal appeared on the Dan Patrick Show on Friday, and he was asked what kind of pro coach Donovan would make. “I think he’d be great,” Beal responded. “I agree with the rumors, I think he’ll definitely leave. I think he won’t pass that opportunity up too many times, and I think he’ll be a tremendous coach. He loves playing in pick-and-rolls, he loves to space the floor and he gives his players freedom, so I think he’ll definitely, he’ll excel well in the league.
Bradley Beal scored 17 points on 6-for-11 shooting over 33 minutes Friday in his third game back from a fibula injury but he hasn’t played in a back-to-back since returning and Beal said he wasn’t sure if he will play Saturday against the Milwaukee Bucks. “We will see how he feels, number one,” Wittman said. “We will talk with the doctor and see where he is at. He will get examined here tonight, which they do anyway, even when it’s not a back to back.”
Beal explained he wouldn’t return until he participated in a full practice session, which is standard procedure and infers that the earliest he could return is Tuesday against the Chicago Bulls because the Wizards aren’t scheduled to practice until Monday. But before Friday’s defeat, Coach Randy Wittman indicated a practice isn’t mandatory for Beal, which opens the possibility of him playing Saturday against the Detroit Pistons. “We’ll see in these next couple days,” Wittman said. “He’s been going through simulations with all our players. All the hard running and stuff that needs to be done and then you check to make sure there’s no lingering effect the next day.”
There was at least one positive development for the Washington Wizards on Friday: Doctors evaluated starting shooting guard Bradley Beal’s injured right fibula in the morning and have given him the green light to resume basketball activities Saturday. “Things are progressing really good,” Coach Randy Wittman said. “They’re going to [ramp] him up more and more now so he can get out, shooting and running and stuff, and see how that reacts.”
Now Beal will be shut down for the next few days, allowing for the healing process to begin. The extended rest should also help the lingering toe issue which could have actually been the real culprit behind this most recent stress injury. If the toe injury altered Beal’s normal biomechanics, the previously fractured fibula could have been subjected to a higher than normal amount of stress that has since developed into this latest injury. The Wizards should have a better idea of how long their emerging guard will need to sit and if his absence will continue after the break. Unfortunately history isn’t on Beal’s side as his personal history and precedent set by players like Holiday and McGee suggest a conservative approach would be best and a prolonged absence is likely.
But, D.C.’s Home Rule Act exempts people who work in the city, as Scherzer will from April through September or October every year, as he will, from having to pay D.C. income taxes if they reside outside the city. The Act was implemented to encourage non-residents to work in the city (and buy things, which are subject to local sales taxes). “Any non-resident of D.C. is not taxed by D.C., including the visiting players who go in there,” said Mark Goldstick, CFO of Priority Sports, the Chicago-based agency that represents numerous NBA and NFL players, including the Wizards’ Bradley Beal. “They are taxed by the resident state. Other states tax visiting players when they go in. D.C. does not — at least for now.”
Wizards guard Bradley Beal admitted that he had “no idea” who Adkins was before the two met at the Las Vegas summer league in July, but Beal and swingman Martell Webster both credited Adkins for challenging yet enjoyable rehabilitation sessions that closely resembled game-like situations as they recovered from injuries to start the season. “He definitely pushes you to the max, man,” Beal said. “He wants the best for you, and he’s going to push you until your tongue is hanging dry. He’ll do whatever it takes to get you better.”
And by the end of the period, thanks to a six-point run by John Wall, a series of defensive stops in the waning moments, and a perfectly executed inbounds play to win the game with 0.8 seconds remaining, the Wizards departed Florida with their second implausible victory in a row. “I think we are doing a great job staying poised and calm down the stretch,” said Bradley Beal, who laid the ball in on Andre Miller’s lob pass to win the game. “It would be a lot better if we could avoid those situations as much as possible, but whenever we are we do a great job not panicking, just running stuff, and getting stops when we need to and just executing down the stretch.”
Paul Pierce set the screen on the wing for Beal, who peeled around and darted down the lane with the Magic’s Victor Oladipo a couple steps behind. Beal didn’t see Miller throw the ball. But by the time he prepared to leap, the pass had arced over Dedmon’s arms. Beal got both hands on it and in one motion redirected it through the basket before time expired for a 91-89 victory at Amway Center. “The execution was just perfect,” Coach Randy Wittman said.
Wittman uses a key four-letter word that puts what he means in to proper context: “He’s gets himself in trouble sometimes when he’s looking just to pass.” Beal took a season-high 19 shots, making 11. He only tried 10 vs. Denver, converting five. “Witt is still mad at me because he said I wasn’t aggressive enough,” said Beal with a sarcastic tone that produced some laughter. “I don’t know what more he wants from me. I’m trying.”
Bradley Beal knew Michael Brown, the way you know people in your neighborhood, even though you’re not boys (or girls) with them. “He was a good guy,” the Washington Wizards’ guard said Friday. Beal was born in St. Louis and starred at Chaminade Prep before succeeding at Florida and, now, in the NBA. “I never hung out with him, but I’d seen him before. And it’s sad. The fact that whenever you see somebody like that, it’s like, ‘Wow, I just seen him before, I seen him this summer, and now he’s gone.’ I just lost one of my closest best friends this summer as well in St. Louis. It’s crazy. You never know when your time is going to come.”
Wizards guard Bradley Beal grew up in St. Louis — he still loves the Cardinals and Imo’s pizza — “about 10 minutes” from Ferguson, where protests broke out Monday night in reaction to the grand jury’s decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for killing unarmed teenager Michael Brown. “It’s definitely heartbreaking because I knew [Brown], and then on top of that, I know a lot of people in that area,” Beal told ABC 7 before Tuesday’s loss to the Hawks.
So, yes, Beal heard of Thompson’s maximum-level extension with the Golden State Warriors before the season, but he simply shrugs his shoulders. Nothing changed here, Beal promises. “Money never will change who I am,” Beal told RealGM. “I kind of distance myself from the business part because when you get too caught up in money, it takes your mind off why you really play the game. I play for the love of it. I’m not going to think about contracts or any of that. If that [max] contract is what it is, then it is what it is. But it’s not going to change who I am. Money never will.
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Beal swears the only business on his mind is the work, the day-to-day improvement, and work has been good. Beal and John Wall join Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson as the NBA’s best backcourts across the country’s coasts. As league executives believe in Beal’s ability to command a maximum salary extension, the Wizards have made clear around the NBA that they’ll do whatever necessary to secure Beal’s long-term deal, sources told RealGM.
Wittman, as expected, stopped short of giving an exact date for Beal’s season debut. Beal hopes he can play Friday against the Cleveland Cavaliers, exactly six weeks after sustaining the injury. But, as Wittman explained, it depends on how the wrist responds during practice. “This is a day-to-day thing,” Wittman said after the Wizards topped the Orlando Magic, 98-93, at Verizon Center on Saturday night. “I can’t tell you Friday he’s going to be ready or next week. He’s got to get on the floor. He’s got to get his timing. The last thing we want to do is throw him out there when he’s not really ready yet to play. He missed a long time so he’s got to get his legs back under him and all that and we’ll see where that is.”
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Washington Wizards shooting guard Bradley Beal, out since Oct. 10 with a fractured left wrist, is expected to return to practice this week and is “hoping” to make his season debut Friday night against the Cleveland Cavaliers, according to a person with knowledge of the situation. Beal broke the wrist — specifically a non-displaced fracture in the scaphoid bone — when he landed on it in the second quarter of a preseason game against the Charlotte Hornets and underwent surgery two days later. Washington announced Beal would miss approximately six weeks. Friday, Beal’s target day, would mark exactly six weeks since sustaining the injury.
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Washington Wizards President Ernie Grunfeld announced today that the team has exercised the fourth-year contract option on Bradley Beal and the third-year contract option on Otto Porter. “Bradley and Otto are both big pieces of the core group of players that we will build around as we continue to improve our team,” said Grunfeld. “We look forward to them playing significant roles in our success both now and in the future.”
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That the Wizards will pick up the fourth-year option for the 2015-16 season on Bradley Beal’s rookie contract before this one tips is a foregone conclusion. His latest injury, a left wrist fracture that required surgery, will have no negative impact on his future here or the team’s plans to work out an extension this summer, multiple persons on both sides have confirmed to CSNwashington.com. “Any day now” one of the several people with knowledge of the situation said leading up to Sunday’s preseason game with the Detroit Pistons.
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The Washington Wizards, expected to compete for a top spot in the Eastern Conference this season, suffered a major blow to their hopes of a quick start with the loss of guard Bradley Beal, who could miss as much as six to eight weeks after breaking his left wrist, according to league sources. The Wizards expect Beal will undergo surgery in the next few days. Beal suffered the injury during Friday night’s exhibition game against the Charlotte Hornets, after Hornets swingman P.J. Hairston fouled him in the first quarter. The Wizards initially diagnosed the injury as a sprained wrist, but an examination Saturday detailed a small fracture in the wrist. Beal’s agent, Mark Bartlestein, said Saturday via text that Beal hoped he could avoid surgery and was waiting for final results from physicians in evaluating the scope of the injury.