Etan Thomas Rumors

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Etan Thomas
Etan Thomas
Position: None
Born: 04/01/78
Height: 6-10 / 2.08
Weight:259 lbs. / 117.9 kg.
Ronny Turiaf: When I think about the last ten years, I view it as a journey of self-discovery. The nomadic lifestyle I enjoy. Being open to new experiences. Exploring life to the limit. It’s been a fun ride. There’s a quote by Martin Lawrence: “Live this life until the wheels fall off.” That’s what I’m doing. I never wanted my heart surgery to define me, but then I learned to tap into the darkness that came with it to live my life fully. I embraced that basketball can allow me to touch lives. I’ve left a mark with my Heart To Heart Foundation. Fred Hoiberg was my mentor, and I’ve in turn reached out to other players like Jeff Green, Etan Thomas, Chuck Hayes and Channing Frye, who’ve faced similar challenges. I now enjoy that people see me as the guy who had open heart surgery. If I can use that to help other people, I’m all about it.
via The Players' Tribune
Eight years later, they remain friends and together helped guide Washington’s Etan Thomas through his heart surgery two years after theirs. “Every time I had a question, every time he had a question, we were there for moral support,” Turiaf said. “Of course, we still talk. It is not a one-way ticket for heart surgery, it is a lifetime bond we have. For me, that shows basketball is a game that transcends generations, that transcends colors. To have somebody like Fred Hoiberg and myself become partners in this crazy ordeal, it’s a wonderful thing for me.”
via Minneapolis Star-Tribune
Stoudemire, who also has a new book out for children called “STAT: Home Court,” talked about losing his father, Hazell, at 12 years old, and how he turned to hip-hop, listening to 2Pac and The Notorious B.I.G. for direction. Now, as an entertainer himself, he understands the importance of helping under-served children find their way. And he wants fathers to have that commitment with their own children. Even in his 10th year in the NBA, Stoudemire, who has three kids, still feels pro athletes have a lot of work to do. “We have to be kings of the world, leaders, so we can build kings of the world,” he said. “What they see on TV is that we got the big money, the big cars, the beautiful homes. But we’ve got to figure out ways to be positive influences to the youth because they follow us. Whatever we do, they want to do. We have to tell them to stay in school and keep their heads up. I was a history buff growing up. It seems like it’s not cool to be smart, but it is.”
via ESPN.com