Gorgui Dieng Rumors

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Gorgui Dieng
Position: C
Born: 01/18/90
Height: 6-11 / 2.11
Weight:245 lbs. / 111.1 kg.
Salary: $1,474,440
Gorgui Dieng began his NBA pursuits as a teenager when he left Senegal for Huntington Prep School in West Virginia. The flight to the United States presented its own set of challenges — Dieng did not speak English and had to navigate his way through a layover with the help of airline attendants. Once with his host family, he struggled being away from his own. Not only did he miss his relatives, he also yearned for the traditions he had grown up with, particularly when it came time to eat. “People have family meals back home,” Dieng said. “They make time for it, have lunch, breakfast, dinner. The (family values) are different.”
“I’ve been working a lot on that this summer.,” Dieng said. I’m always looking out for something to improve my game and I think something like that added to my game will really help me.” He’s just fun to watch play. “He’s going to be a work in progress but every day he gets better,” said David Adelman, who coached the Timberwolves at Summer League. “We’re trying to teach him a lot of little nuances, just playing off the ball, scoring on the block, things like that…. “The main thing with him is keeping his ear on things and letting him know he’s got to run front rim to front rim every time down the court. He’s got to be the first big down the court, with his athleticism and how he moves his feet, that should be the thing. And just playing off the ball, like if a big guy like (Kyrylo) Fesenko has the ball on the block he should be up at the free throw line where he can see him. Just kind of playing in a tandem.”
Summer League can be a great measuring stick. A year ago Gorgui Dieng looked a little confused by the speed and style of the NBA/Summer League game. He was thinking and not just playing, and with that he looked like a lost rookie. A year later he is owning it — Dieng had 13 points and 19 rebounds in Minnesota’s win over the Suns Wednesday. “I feel more comfortable but I’ll let you guys judge,” Dieng said after the game. It doesn’t take much of a judge to see the leap he has made.
Saunders called on second-year players Dieng to gain weight this offseason and Muhammad to lose some. Muhammad, who was listed at 6-6, 225 pounds last season, is believed to have lost about seven or eight pounds, and Saunders said the Wolves would like him to lose about 15 before the start of the season. Dieng, who was listed at 6-11, 245 pounds, has gained “a lot” of weight and “good” strength, Saunders said.
Dieng, who was prepping for his first NBA season, was not on that side but he definitely wants to wear the green of Senegal at the FIBA Basketball World Cup this summer in Spain. “I’m very excited to go back and play for my national team, to play for my country.” […]It’s clear that representing Senegal is his next priority. “I’m looking forward to going back and fight for my country. Whatever it takes. If they need me to score, I can score. If they need me to protect the rim, I can do. It’s not me to decide what I want to do. It’s how the coach wants to use me. I will do whatever the coach wants (me to do).
Dieng, who was named the NBA’s Western Conference Rookie of the Month for March, is now hoping that Senegal’s national team coach feels the same. “I’m really excited about that. I spoke to the coach (Cheikh Sarr) today,” Dieng said in Charlotte. “He’s here in the States looking at the college kids and stuff.” One of these players may have been Adama “Louis” Adams, a South Carolina State senior point guard from Senegal’s AfroBasket team last summer.
Chase Budinger, Dante Cunningham, Ronny Turiaf, Shabazz Muhammad, Gorgui Dieng, Lorenzo Brown and Robbie Hummel were all on hand Friday and participating in a 5-on-5 scrimmage. The chance to come in early allows rookies like Muhammad, Dieng and Brown to get familiar with the facilities and some of the training regimens prior to Training Camp. For guys like Budinger and Cunningham, it’s a way to get re-acquainted with the day-to-day grind.