Hakeem Olajuwon Rumors

All NBA Players

0
Hakeem Olajuwon
Hakeem Olajuwon
Position: None
Born: 01/21/63
Height: 7-0 / 2.13
Weight:255 lbs. / 115.7 kg.
Chandler and Gasol have enjoyed great careers, Brown and Curry not so much. It’s a reminder that betting the franchise’s future on big men is always risky, with the most infamous example coming in 1984 when Hakeem Olajuwon went No. 1, Sam Bowie went No. 2 and the player widely considered to be the best ever in the game was still on the board. A lesser-known blunder from that draft was that 15 teams passed on John Stockton. “You go back to the Olajuwon-Bowie-Jordan draft,” Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak said. “In years past and maybe even today it makes sense to build around a big, but you don’t want to take a big because it’s a big and pass on the No. 3 pick — which turned out to be Michael Jordan.” Hence, maybe taking a guard the wiser move “It can be argued in today’s game that maybe you should do that,” Kupchak said.
A better rule is to count all players not born in the U.S. and who did not attend a U.S. high school. That puts Spain, with 220 WAR, at the top. And the Gasols make up nearly three-quarters of their home country’s NBA success. The other top players from Spain include Jose Calderon, Ricky Rubio and Rudy Fernandez, among others. Germany slides to fourth, behind the U.S. Virgin Islands and Nigeria, using this method. Why? Because Detlef Schrempf (and his 90 career WAR) is excluded from this analysis. Schrempf, German-born and raised, moved to the U.S. to finish high school. The Virgin Islands, being a territory, arguably doesn’t count as international, but it competes under its own flag so it’s broken out here. Tim Duncan is responsible for the bulk of the Virgin Islands’ WAR; Hakeem Olajuwon similarly for Nigeria.
wpid-i_02_9e_22_hakeem_olajuwon.jpg
Olajuwon actually sat down with the guys from Red Nation and went down memory lane with them. It’s a long video, but here’s the paraphrased quote from “The Dream” Spurs fans are looking for: ” I want to correct everybody, David deserved the MVP. I wasn’t having an MVP year that year and David was having a great year. The motivation was knowing we can win but had nothing to do with being mad at losing the MVP to David Robinson.”
NBA: What are your impressions of him? HAKEEM OLAJUWON: I’m not really surprised to see him do well in the NBA – he will do much better with time and confidence. Confidence means a lot. Skills, as with maturity, will come, but that confidence level to express himself without fear — to experiment new moves or things that you are comfortable to do, but in game situation and hold back — that confidence level takes time. First of all it’s from coaching or from within. Sometimes the coach will want to limit your ability: “just do this, just do this.” But you know you can do much more, but don’t do much more, just do what you’re asked – so you need to fight to express yourself. Then (you) gain the coaches’ trust to be more comfortable, give more responsibility – then you have freedom, when you get to the point of (having) freedom, then the coach (will) trust your judgment, then you can play freely, then you can really excel to the next level.
wpid-i_25_b2_ea_182589974.jpg
Olajuwon finished his illustrious 18-year career in 2002 with 26,946 points. Nowitzki, now in his 17th season, has 26,930 points. That’s a lot of baskets for a player who couldn’t find one that dreadful day in Seattle, and who was basically unheard of before he was chosen out of Germany with the ninth overall pick in the 1998 NBA Draft. “What I like about Dirk is he came in without a lot of expectations, besides [then-Mavs coach Don Nelson] putting the pressure on him to be the Rookie of the Year,” Finley said. “But he worked himself up to superstar status. “A lot of these guys come in from college and already are, quote unquote, put in a superstar category without doing anything. Dirk did it the hard way. He worked himself up and now he’s one of the best ever to play the game.”
At least one former MVP doesn’t think it should have taken a broken bone in Kevin Durant’s foot to throw the 2015 MVP race wide open. According to Hakeem Olajuwon, Dwight Howard was already prepared to kick the door down. “He’s healthy. He’s strong. He’s ready,” said Olajuwon, who won the award in 1994 when he led the Rockets to the first of their back-to-back championships. “Now it’s about having the attitude to go out every night and dominate.”
wpid-i_67_bd_40_danny_ferry.jpg
Olajuwon said Ferry reached out to NBA Vice President for Development in Africa Amadou Gallo Fall and asked to speak with Olajuwon, but Olajuwon said Ferry need not apologize to him because he does not believe the comments reflected Ferry’s way of thinking. “He’s been calling all the players to apologize,” Olajuwon said. “As you know, it was a surprise that kind of comment is still in mind. Those were not his words. He did not mean it. He was repeating something. I did not know what he meant. I don’t know what someone was thinking to say that. But those are not his words. He called Amadou to get my number. I told him, ‘There’s no need.’ I thought about it. He’s trying to rebound, to recover.”
wpid-i_02_9e_22_hakeem_olajuwon.jpg
When the day came for the two giants to be enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, the long, intertwined paths traveled by Hakeem Olajuwon and Patrick Ewing collided once more. It happened in an intersection on a sunny day in September 2008 as they strolled through Springfield, Mass., to the ceremony. Olajuwon trailed Ewing into the crosswalk; one was always chasing the other, forever trying to close the gap. The man they called Dream was awestruck by what he saw. “We were crossing the street and I was walking behind Patrick, and I saw his physique from the back,” Olajuwon said. “And I said, ‘How did I ever get my shot over this guy?’ That just shows you how super imposing Patrick really is. How did I battle this guy?”