James Jones Rumors

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James Jones
James Jones
Position: G-F
Born: 10/04/80
Height: 6-8 / 2.03
Weight:225 lbs. / 102.1 kg.
It seems like you guys have also developed a strong bond in the six plus months that you have been there. You guys are always posting up those Instagram photos after games. How is the camaraderie there? How is everything going for you? Kevin Love: The camaraderie has been great. This team is very close. We have a mix of guys, you know? Guys like who are in their second year like Delly (Matthew Dellavedova). Joe Harris is in his first year, he’s our rook which always makes it fun to have him do the different duties. Then we have guys like Brendan Haywood, James Jones, Mike Miller and Shawn Marion, that are all the way up into their fifteenth or sixteenth season.
It’s not likely that owners would go after the max-salaried guys. But the game’s stars have long been frustrated by what they believe is an artificial limitation placed on what they can earn, especially compared to players in baseball that make tens of millions more. That will be one of the issues about which James has to get up to speed. “It takes about a year,” Jones said. “You really have to go to the summer meetings to get a full grasp of what the union is about, and then have some time to look at the CBA, look at the issues, look at the areas for improvement and look beyond those things. Because as we see with this new CBA, every deadline, every two months something unfolds that is an unintended consequence of this deal being struck.”
“He’s happy,” said Jones, who’s now in his fifth season as James’ teammate. “People are always looking and prodding, hoping they can glean something from his body language or asking other sources how he feels, but if you ask him directly he’ll tell you he’s happy. He’s enjoying his time here in Cleveland. He’s focused on getting himself healthy and building a contender.”
Short of saying those exact words, it’s clear James, who conceded he had butterflies entering the arena, appreciated his time with the Heat and in Miami. “I played some great basketball here,” James said. “I miss my teammates more than anything. The camaraderie that we had and the guys that are still here and the guys that are not still here like Shane (Battier) and Ray (Allen) — I still have Mike (Miller) with me, and (James Jones) — but all the guys, we built something that will last forever.”
It’s Miami week for LeBron James, finally. The long-anticipated Christmas Day matchup featuring James and the Cavaliers against the Heat in Miami – where James won two championships and played the last four years – is Thursday at 5 p.m. in the NBA’s prime slot on Christmas. The Heat will honor both James and Cavaliers reserve James Jones with video tributes at AmericanAirlines Arena, the Heat confirmed Monday. Jones played for Miami from 2008 through last season.
The 3-point specialist breaks a substantial sweat, not knowing if his services will be used. And the 12-year veteran surprisingly likes it that way. “I never go into a game with the expectations of playing,” Jones said. “I actually prefer not to be told [I’m playing] because I approach it all the same. “If coach throws me in the game for 10 or 15 minutes, I’m a professional athlete. I should be able to do that. I don’t tailor or taper back my game-day routine just because I’ll be playing. That to me, would kind of eliminate the consistency that I need to do my job.”
More than a decade later, Miller is no longer the slashing playmaker of his NBA youth. He’s now the smooth-shooting veteran on the revamped Cleveland Cavaliers. It’s a role he’s seemingly been preparing for his entire career: to be there at the right moment for the right shot or the right words. Wherever Miller has played, he has been a friend to the stars — and the scrubs, executives, coaches, and everyone in between. “He has the unique experience of playing in every situation,” said James Jones, a fellow Heat-to-Cavaliers transplant. “He’s been on rebuilding teams. He’s been on championship teams. He’s been on contending teams. He’s been a starter. He’s been the sixth man. He’s been out of the rotation. He’s been injured. He’s bounced back and came back. Every player in this league can relate to him on some level. That’s tough to find because you find that a lot of guys spend most of their time on the extremes. They’re either major rotation guys [who] get a lot of opportunities or they’re fringe guys that are grinding every day to maintain a position in the league.”
Jones elaborated on how the reserves would be impacted. “If there’s 44 minutes in a game and teams decide to play their starters the same exact way, you limit four minutes a game from a reserve,” he explained “If you extrapolate that over a course of a season, you’re talking 328 minutes. That’s a lot when you’re talking about value. I think anytime you start talking about shortening games, extending games, there has to be a thorough conversation between the league and the players. Limiting minutes has a bigger impact on reserve players.”
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Cleveland’s James Jones, who happens to serve as the secretary-treasurer of the National Basketball Players Association, says he doesn’t support the reduction of minutes being that it will have a negative effect on the reserve players. “The structure of the games, the amounts of minutes that are played are working condition issues for us because it limits how much time our guys actually have to work,” Jones told Northeast Ohio Media Group. “It’s a major concern for us because there is an attempt, or at least an examination to see whether or not you limit the minutes of the games. And that has a direct impact on player’s opportunities to work and to provide for themselves.”
It’s well known at this point that the Heat angered LeBron by amnestying Miller not long after Miller helped the Heat repeat as NBA champions in 2013. Miller said earlier this week in Cleveland that LeBron thought the move “was an unnecessary change.” That’s Miller being nice, of course. Really what probably made LeBron most angry is that the Heat amnestied one of his best friends to save money and then squabbled with Miller over money a South Beach bling king stole from Miller and then, in an odd twist, gave to the Heat. It’s a bizarre tale, and one that certainly infuriates Miller, Jones and Lewis. It’s probably not a coincidence then that all three of those players no longer play for the Heat.
Mike Miller and James Jones came to Cleveland to help LeBron James win an NBA title. They hope Ray Allen joins them. Miller and Jones were introduced Wednesday by the Cavaliers, who remain interested in signing Allen, the most prolific 3-point shooter in league history. Jones, who won two NBA titles as James’ teammate in Miami, said he recently spent time with Allen in Connecticut. Jones said he would love to play with Allen again, but doesn’t know if the 39-year-old will play another season.
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“No,” he said when asked about the assumption that he would return as a Cavalier. “There’s so much speculation about me going to Cleveland. I haven’t even decided where I will play. Obviously LeBron and I are great friends, and James Jones and I are really close. But at no point have those two tried to push me in that direction. I haven’t had that conversation. LeBron and I went on vacation to the Bahamas earlier this summer, and we didn’t talk one iota about things. And that was before he made his decision. It’s just what they start talking about on TV — where I’m supposed to go. I have not leaned towards Cleveland,” said Allen. “I have not made any mention of going to Cleveland. These last two months were about me physically, and deciding whether I want to play again.”
Hours from NBA players voting for a new union executive director, the National Basketball Players Association’s executive committee had a strong message to deliver. The search to replace Billy Hunter, who has fired during All-Star weekend in Houston in 2013, was thorough, according to NBPA secretary-treasurer James Jones “The search process was extremely efficient, extremely thorough and timely,” Jones told USA TODAY Sports. “Not only did we have an expanded search committee input and involvement, we had had the opportunity for our players to engage in the interviews with a high-level of focus.