Jason Collins Rumors

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Jason Collins
Jason Collins
Position: None
Born: 12/02/78
Height: 7-0 / 2.13
Weight:259 lbs. / 117.9 kg.
In fact, she is the lead on the Nets first “Pride Night,” January 25, where the Nets will celebrate LGBTQ inclusion and diversity in general, welcoming back Jason Collins, the two-time Net who in 2013 became the first openly gay athlete in any of the four major pro sports. “The first team to sign Collins after he came out was the Brooklyn Nets. I was so proud coming to work that day,” she noted. “He is a true role model, and I am honored to stand with him.”
Storyline: Nets Front Office
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As former NBA players Grant Hill, Steve Smith and Jason Collins began a private tour of the National Civil Rights Museum on Jan. 14, Kevin Lloyd proudly stood alongside them in place of his late father, who first opened the NBA door for black players. Hill, Smith, Collins and every African-American NBA player past and present should know Earl Lloyd’s story. On Halloween night in 1950, Lloyd became the first black player in NBA history when he debuted for the Washington Capitals. “I had the good fortune of meeting Earl Lloyd back in Detroit during the mid-’90s,” Hill told The Undefeated.
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Collins is also known as being the first openly gay active basketball player in the NBA. In 2013, he shared his story with Sports Illustrated, and he has since advocated for the LGBTQ+ community. He and his brother, also a retired NBA player, met Clinton’s daughter Chelsea at Stanford University 20 years ago. Since then, he’s gotten to know the Clinton family. “We got to see the president and first lady at the time as mom and dad, and then over the years, as grandma and grandpa,” Collins said. He said this election is more important than ever, especially with so many U.S. Supreme Court justice seats at stake. “I am a huge fan of Hillary,” Collins said. “She’s a trailblazer. I have a connection with the Clintons. She really deeply cares about all of us, not just some of us, and I think she would be an amazing president.”
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The NBA players will be joined by NBA Global Ambassador and Hall of Famer Dikembe Mutombo (Democratic Republic of the Congo); former NBA players Charlie Bell (U.S.), Jason Collins (U.S.), Olumide Oyedeji (Nigeria); and former WNBA players Astou Ndiaye-Diatta (Senegal) and Jenn Lacy (U.S.). “We are pleased to partner with FIBA to bring the 14th edition of Basketball without Borders Africa to Angola for the first time,” said NBA Vice President and Managing Director for Africa, Amadou Gallo Fall. “Africa’s growing basketball ecosystem led to a record 10 African players on NBA rosters at the start of last season and five African players selected in the 2016 NBA Draft. This year’s camp will once again provide young players from across the continent with the tools to succeed on the court and in life.”
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Verdicts from the league office are one thing. Real change in the locker room is quite another. “It’s more about stigmas than anything else, and I think with those stigmas you have people who are going to be judged,” said Sue Bird of the Seattle Storm. “I think on the men’s side, they’re not quite there yet. Jason Collins, for him to do that, particularly in the basketball world, he was the one who kind of broke down the barrier. And maybe in the future, it’ll change. But I think right now there’s still that stigma. I would love for it to change, because it’s really not that big of a deal in all reality. “The NBA moving the All-Star game was a tremendous stand. It’s about the NBA having that platform to create change that needs to be created.”
Storyline: All-Star Location
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Jason Collins: My official statement on the @NBA moving the 2017 All Star game out of North Carolina. #NBAfamily: “As a member of the NBA family and as a gay man, I’m extremely proud to see the NBA take initiative and move the All Star Game from North Carolina. Their decision is an extremely poignant one and shows that discrimination of any kind is not welcome in sports and is not acceptable in any part of our society. The NBA has set the best kind of example and precedent moving forward for all to follow.”