Jeff Teague Rumors

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Jeff Teague
Jeff Teague
Position: G
Born: 06/10/88
Height: 6-2 / 1.88
Weight:179 lbs. / 81.6 kg.
Salary: $8,000,000
Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer was not concerned with Teague’s play following Tuesday’s game. “It’s an interesting stat line for him,” Budenholzer said. “To get seven rebounds for him, is huge. For him to get five defensive (rebounds), if we can get our guards back in there and rebouding and committed to that, that’s important. I thought his floor game, when he came back in at the nine or 10 minute mark of the fourth quarter, I thought he made all the right reads, all the right decisions. Sometimes, Jeff is scoring. Lots of times Jeff is reading the game and facililtating. I thought nine, eight and seven, there are a lot of positives to get that.”
On the other side of the spectum, we have Atlanta. The Hawks’ four All-Stars (Al Horford, Paul Millsap, Jeff Teague and Kyle Korver) combined for $35,753,521 in salaries in 2014-15, which is way less than Carmelo Anthony and Amare Stoudemire alone made in New York. Each win cost Atlanta less than $1 million. No other team in the NBA can say that, even though Golden State came close
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Jeff Teague will likely return to the Hawks lineup Monday after missing the past two games with a left ankle sprain. Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer said a definite decision on the status of the starting point will be made closer to game time but all indications are he will play against the Bucks. “He went through shootaround and we expect him to play but we’ll probably re-evaluate him just to make sure before the game,” Budenholzer said.
Jeff Teague has been ruled out for tonight’s game against the Heat with due to a tender ankle. Hawks coach Mike Budenholder did not say whether Teague would miss additional time. Dennis Schroder will join the rest of the Hawks regular starters in place of Teague. “Jeff is tender and will not play tonight,” Budenholzer said. “He is not able to go. We will just wait and see how it goes and err on the side of caution. We’ll see how he does today.”
Budenholzer installed his version of the read-and-react offense, with hints of Popovich and Mike D’Antoni. “We’ve basically got two plays—strong and weak,” Teague explains. “That gets us into positions, but from there, we all have to make split-second decisions on what we do out of it: maybe a high pick-and-roll, or a dribble handoff, or Kyle coming around a screen. We look at the defense and just do what feels right. Other teams will call out, ‘Thumb four!’ and we know exactly what they’re going to do. No one knows what we’re going to do because we don’t even know ourselves. It’s like controlled pickup.”
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Shortly after sharpshooter Kyle Korver joined the Hawks 2½ years ago, he told Teague how he liked to receive passes when racing around pin-down screens. “He’d never been taught stuff like that,” Korver recalls. “It wasn’t his fault. It was how he’d been programmed.” Rather, it was how he’d been re-programmed. When Shawn watched the Hawks, he cringed, wondering where the kid from The SportZone had gone. “He hated how we played,” Teague says of his father. “He wasn’t even a Hawks fan. He was a Spurs fan.”
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What’s interesting is that while most teams experience lower efficiency rates with increased attempts, Atlanta has actually become a more efficient driving team this season — improving their 41.9 percent drive conversion rate (25th ranked in 2013–14) to a 46.1 percent clip (14th ranked in 2014–15). This can best be explained by Dennis Schroder’s emergence as one of the league’s most prolific drivers. Schroder is the only player in the league who plays less than 20 minutes per game yet still has attempted more than 350 drives for the season. He also converts his drives (48.8 percent) at a higher rate than All-Stars Kyrie Irving, Jeff Teague and Russell Westbrook.
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This game was a thing of beauty, indeed. “I’m enjoying every minute of it,” said Jeff Teague, who scored 23 points to lead seven Atlanta players in double figures. “We’re so unselfish. We don’t care about glory or accolades. It’s just a joy to play on a team like that.” Atlanta, a perennially middle-of-the-road (or worse) franchise, has suddenly become the talk of the NBA. The Hawks are coming off a 19-game winning streak and have the league’s best record (42-9) — without anyone averaging close to 20 points.