JJ redick Rumors

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JJ Redick
Position: G
Born: 06/24/84
Height: 6-4 / 1.93
Weight:190 lbs. / 86.2 kg.
Salary: $7,085,000
He wasn’t happy Paul was injured, of course. He just wasn’t nervous about his task. He wanted to help the Clippers win. He knew he could help the Clippers win. He believed. He always believes. “He’s a confident person. He’s always been that way,” teammate J.J. Redick said. “As a player to get to this level, you have to have something, whether it’s enormous physical talent, size or length or athleticism. Or, you have to be, you know, I don’t know how to put this without using a profanity but you have to be a (expletive), you know. You’ve got to have an edge. And he has that. “He has a belief in himself and that goes a long way.”
JJ Redick: “I think that’s the story right there. Some teams click a little sooner than others. I was in a team in Orlando, coming off the Finals we were 26-15 after 41 games. Everyone was freaking out. We went 33-8 over our last 41, we swept the first two rounds of the playoffs. We were 41-8. So at some point we clicked; at some point it just all kind of came together. I expect that to happen to this team.
J.J. Redick smiles when he’s told he’s having a career season. He’s seemingly always in the midst of a career season. Ever since his second season in the league, Redick has increased his points per game average, going from 4.1 in 2007-08 and gradually moving up over the next eight seasons to 15.6 this season. “Each year, I think I say to myself, ‘I’m playing the best that I’ve played,’ and thankfully this year is no exception,” Redick said. “I feel that way … I feel like every shot I take is going to go in. It’s a great feeling as a player.”
I read that you’ve made your home in Austin. That’s a great town. How’d you decide to live there? JJ Redick: On my honeymoon in 2010, I signed with the Bulls. We had a week at the time, it wasn’t two days, it was a week where Orlando could match. We had a week where it was like “Where are we going to live?” Orlando ended up matching, but then with the lockout, we were trying to find a home base. We knew no one in Austin, we just fell in love with the place and built a house there.
Former Bucks guard J.J. Redick has settled in with the Clippers since signing as a free agent (eventually a sign-and-trade deal) in the summer of 2013, after an ill-fated 28 games with Milwaukee. The Bucks traded promising forward TobiasHarris to Orlando in a deadline deal for Redick, but then guards MontaEllis and BrandonJennings never meshed with the former Duke star. “There weren’t a lot of basketballs when he was here,” Rivers said with a laugh. “And he had a tough go. “J.J. is a byproduct of ball movement and teams that are unselfish. That’s why you kind of felt like here he would fit, because we have that type of group. “He would struggle on a team that doesn’t move the ball. He lived in Orlando and I got to see him a lot, so I probably had inside intel on him. I think you need guys like J.J. on your team.
Redick, who had been so rudely introduced to Sterling’s dysfunctional ways when he nearly nixed his contract just days after reaching an agreement, refused to blame Sterling for this loss. “Was it a small part of the emotional (expletive) that we went through for the last few weeks? Yeah, it was,” Redick told USA TODAY Sports. “But you invest so much in every playoff game. Emotionally, it takes a lot out of you. Going seven with Golden State, that was an emotional thing in itself. And then the way we won Game 4, the way we lost Game 5.”
He had once given white center Chris Kaman a five-year, $52 million deal, and how that contract panned out (or didn’t, as Kaman played 195 games in the next four years of that deal and was traded to New Orleans with a year and a half left) appeared to be coloring Sterling’s judgment on this deal. In a way, it was a mirror-image of the issue that would be front and center 10 months later. “I’ve been told both ways: one, that he didn’t want to pay me because I was white, and that he didn’t want to pay me because I was a bench player,” Redick said. “I didn’t know (the deal almost fell apart) until after the fact. I just got a weird phone call from Doc on July 4, and I got off the phone and said to my wife, ‘Something’s going on.’ He’s like, ‘You better play for me (expletive).’ And I was like, ‘Yeah, that’s the plan. We figured this out two days ago, right?’ “And then he just rambled a bit. … but he never really got into the nuts and bolts of what was happening. And then I got a call about 48 hours later from my agent, and he said, ‘We wanted to keep you out of it, but here’s what happened.'”
Allegedly Sterling, the man whose racist comments sparked this whole furor, didn’t think a white player could possibly be good enough to make that kind of money. He had once given white center Chris Kaman a five-year, $52 million deal, and how that contract panned out (or didn’t, as Kaman played 195 games in the next four years of that deal and was traded to New Orleans with a year and a half left) was coloring Sterling’s judgment on this deal. In a way, it was a mirror-image of the issue that would be front and center 10 months later. “I’ve been told both ways: one, that he didn’t want to pay me because I was white, and that he didn’t want to pay me because I was a bench player,” Redick said. “I didn’t know (the deal almost fell apart) until after the fact. I just got a weird phone call from Doc on July 4, and I got off the phone and said to my wife, ‘Something’s going on.’ He’s like, ‘You better play for me (expletive).’ And I was like, ‘Yeah, that’s the plan. We figured this out two days ago, right?’
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Each has his own vantage point. Each has his own emotions. Each has his own response. But the story about J.J. Redick and his surreal first season with the Clippers captures the Donald Sterling experience as well as anyone’s. At 29 years old and having made the calculated choice as a free agent last summer to come play for coach Doc Rivers and this talented team, Redick was exposed to the Sterling dysfunction from the start when his sign-and-trade deal to come to Los Angeles nearly fell apart after his four-year, $27-million deal had been agreed upon.
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“They’re young men,” Rivers said. “It shouldn’t be African-American men. We have two white guys. It’s about being human. No one was happy about it. J.J. Redick was just as pissed as Chris Paul, and that’s the way it should be. “Having said that, our goal is to win the NBA title and we’re not going to let anything stand in the way of that. That’s adversity that we didn’t want but we have it and we have to deal with it and we’ll deal with it internally but we’re not going to share it with anybody else.”
Through the years, his racism has been sometimes subtle and often overt. For those failing to understand why a racist like Sterling never preferred white players, it cut to the heart of his stereotypical stances on athleticism and strength and talent. Mostly, he’s never loved paying white players. In that way, he has an absolute plantation prism with which he sees players: He always preferred long, strong, physical players. To him, that’s a basketball player: Big, black and strong.
Contrary to Paul and Blake Griffin, Clippers Glen Davis and Redick acknowledged they were distracted over the Sterling situation. “There was a lot going on today,” Redick said. “Unfortunately besides all the peripheral stuff, we played a team that played a great basketball game.” Said Davis: “You’re going to think about it. It’s on your brain. It’s on your mind. You can feel it. But you got to move past it and move forward.”