Josh Childress Rumors

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Josh Childress
Josh Childress
Position: None
Born: 06/20/83
Height: 6-8 / 2.03
Weight:210 lbs. / 95.3 kg.
Josh Childress: The saddest moment of my list up to this point is when my dad passed. I mean I know I’ve gone into the fact that I don’t drink and don’t do any of that stuff, but I never drank because my dad had a drinking problem. That was the biggest reason why I never did and he ended up passing due to his alcohol problem. You know, everyone deals with grief differently, but I felt like I let him down by not helping him more. Yeah…that was a sad point for me.
Josh Childress on veteran influence in the NBA: “I can tell this story. One of my vets was Tony Delk, played at Kentucky, great guy. I had this like toiletry bag. It might have been a team issue toiletry back or it was from Target or something, but it wasn’t super expensive. It was like falling apart. He was like “C’mon man. You’re an NBA player. What are you going to do with that? C’mon rook! You got to get yourself something nice. You’re a professional. You can’t walk around with this nonsense.” That was the first time I felt like – yeah, not pressured, but like I had to represent myself like a professional. I ended up going out and getting me like a Louie Vuitton one.”
BI: I’m keen to know about the Australian experience from an outsider’s point of view. NBL crowds are often well behaved (for the most part). You’ve witnessed your fair share of hostile crowds (especially in Greece), what are a few of the more memorable venues you’ve played in and what has made each of those experiences stick? Josh Childress: I have played in environments where I was worried for my safety – being spat on, having things thrown at you, having small explosives detonate while you shoot a jump shot or having laser pointers in your eyes while shooting free throws. These are just a few things I have experienced. I could write a laundry list of things I’ve seen while playing, but I’ll just say that I enjoy the NBL and its fans.
Josh Childress: I initially received a phone call from my agent while on vacation for my birthday [on June 20]. He mentioned an opportunity to play in Sydney and expressed that he thought it would be a great experience for me. Having always wanted to visit Australia, but not being able to due to the opposite seasons (my offseason was always in the Australian winter), I didn’t really think much of it upon first hearing it. However, I ended up in Sydney after many long discussions with the head of basketball operations Tim Hudson and our head coach Damien Cotter. Having gone through a frustrating few years of basketball, I had lost the fun factor that used to be there. Not playing, being cut and getting injured made the game more stressful than fun. When speaking with both of them, they were more interested in helping me redevelop my passion and helping me build my brand off the court than on it. That’s when I really knew that I had a great opportunity.
Before Christmas, Childress was in great form and put himself in contention for the NBL’s most valuable player award. Childress has enjoyed his time in Sydney and is interested in helping the Kings improve next season. “We’re talking about it,” he confirmed yesterday. “The injury is unfortunate and fortunate. I have a lot more downtime now to go through a contract with the Kings and my agent and find out if we can reach an agreement that’s good for both sides.”
Sydney Kings star import Josh Childress will face three charges on Tuesday and the potential sanction of a suspension, in one of the highest profile NBL tribunal hearings in the competition’s history. American Childress, widely regarded as the best credentialled NBA player to appear in the NBL after 391 matches in the world’s best club league, was ejected from last Friday’s clash with the Wildcats in Perth, after flattening opposing forward Jesse Wagstaff. Childress 31, has been charged with striking with an elbow, unduly rough play and bringing the game into disrepute. He will appear before an independent tribunal in Sydney from 5.30pm (7.30pm NZT) on Tuesday.
Childress took aim at the NBL and the Wildcats physical brand of play on Twitter after the match before later removing the comment from social media. On Friday night, the US import posted: “@NBL it was very clear who runs the league and the officials tonight. Maybe the best officiated game I’ve ever been a part of.” Childress said a number of NBL players had privately applauded his stance. “While I think the referee situation wasn’t exactly impartial and unbiased, I probably shouldn’t have tweeted what I did,” he said. “It’s an interesting situation because on one hand I’m getting vilified by thousands of people for supposedly being a thug and a dirty player.
“At the same time I felt like I needed to take a stand for myself and for my team. “We need to develop an identity and a toughness at the Kings, that’s what we’re striving to do. “Granted, I went about it the wrong way. But I can’t say that I enjoy persistently getting hit, scratched, beat and held. “I’m supposed to be the bigger person and just turn a blind eye. I’m not saying to condone what I did because I for sure over-reacted.
Childress, who still pockets a cool $7 million a season, has apologised for the Friday night brain snap which saw him ejected for striking Perth Wildcats forward Jesse Wagstaff. The ex-NBA player will most likely be charged by the NBL tomorrow ahead of a Tuesday night tribunal appearance, with the incident attracting international attention due to Childress’s global profile. “I want to apologise for my reaction, I definitely think I reacted poorly,” Childress told The Sunday Telegraph.
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Childress has a contract offer by the Sidney Kings of Australian NBL and he is currently considering this option. After being cut last December by New Orleans, Childress’ career has been in a limbo, however money is not an issue for him. He was amnestied by Phoenix back in 2012 and he will be paid for the upcoming season a total of 7.3 m. US dollars by the Suns. Meanwhile, he got his sociology degree from Stanford and he was always a person open to new experiences and foreign cultures.
Williams correctly points out the club could not anticipate second-year power forward Darius Miller suffering a stress fracture in his left foot that required corrective surgery in September, sidelining him indefinitely, nor the toe chip fracture sustained by forward Ryan Anderson that still keeps him off the floor and could for several more weeks. Tuesday moves, he said, have been pondered for the last few weeks. “I don’t make rash decisions,” Williams said. “It’s like everybody always thinks the worst all the time. It’s seven games. There’s no need for all that. We’re going to try to tweak our roster as best we can to try to get better. That’s the bottom line.”
After the Wizards’ regulars turned what was about to be a blowout loss into a lopsided victory, Wittman gave the tenuous trio one last opportunity to play as a way of recognizing the contributions that they had made since training camp. “You always like to play guys like that more than you’re able to,” Wittman said. “That’s the tough part about, having a bunch of those guys in the preseason, especially with us. We needed to get guys on the floor playing together. But they were great. Practiced hard, played like they did. X has a lot of confidence. Josh knows how to play. He’s been around the block. Pop. It was good to get them in.”
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Childress, the sixth overall pick of the 2004 NBA draft, received almost four times more minutes than Silas and Mensah-Bonsu with Martell Webster sidelined because of a sprained left ankle. He scored five points, grabbed four rebounds and added a steal but was appreciative of the opportunity that he got to revitalize his career in Washington. “I’ve been around the league for a minute and I know that, you’re not always going to get playing time, you’re not always going to get a ton of touches,” he said. “You have to try and work through that and bring a bunch of other things to the table. I’m glad I came and we’ll see what happens in the future. I don’t have any expectations. Just kind of wait and continue to keep working and keep pushing.”