Keyon Dooling Rumors

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Keyon Dooling
Keyon Dooling
Position: None
Born: 05/08/80
Height: 6-3 / 1.91
Weight:196 lbs. / 88.9 kg.
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There are more positive sentiments in the NBA Players Association with its new leadership, featuring executive director Michele Roberts. Players are more upbeat about the direction of the union entering potentially turbulent times with the expected opt-out of the current contract in 2017. Former NBA player Keyon Dooling, who was part of the executive committee during his final playing years and is now helping out with union business, said he is encouraged by the new direction. “There’s a certain pedigree that you know you’re in good hands,” he said. “Transformational leadership is what I like to call it. This generation wants to be united because you can learn from some of the mistakes that we made during the last lockout. “I hope this young generation really understands the importance of getting involved with the union, collective bargaining, and fighting hard to not only keep what we’ve earned but push it forward and continuing to grow as the game grows.”
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Keyon Dooling on Scott Skiles: “During my time in Milwaukee, he had an average relationship with the players. I don’t think it was great, I don’t think it was bad. His work ethic, X’s and O’s and game-planning were his strengths. Where he fell short is maybe with people.” “I wouldn’t call him a players’ coach, but I wouldn’t call him a coach players wouldn’t like to play for either. I enjoyed playing for him. I learned every day. I was prepared from a game-playing standpoint. He was a very hard worker and I’m really not one to judge coaches by how friendly my relationship was with them.”
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Keyon Dooling: “Skiles is a high-pedigree coach. A lot of times when coaches get fired, they get better at wherever they were weak. (If he gets the Orlando job) I think he’ll be better in how he deals with players this time. During my time in Milwaukee, he had an average relationship with the players. I don’t think it was great, I don’t think it was bad. His work ethic, X’s and O’s and game-planning were his strengths. Where he fell short is maybe with people. I wouldn’t call him a players’ coach, but I wouldn’t call him a coach players wouldn’t like to play for either. I enjoyed playing for him. I learned every day. I was prepared from a game-playing standpoint. He was a very hard worker and I’m really not one to judge coaches by how friendly my relationship was with them.”
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Keyon Dooling: So here I was, on a mission to connect with this supposedly scary dude everyone’s talking about. I didn’t really have a choice, they even moved his locker next to mine to get the relationship going. Result? A great friendship! I found him to be the total opposite of scary. I think the timing had a lot to with it – he was at a place in life where he was open to my way of helping. There were a lot of misconceptions about him in the media and even in the league, and I wanted people to appreciate Ray (that’s what I call him) for who he truly was.
Keyon Dooling: He also gave the best pregame speeches I had ever heard in my life. It wasn’t the standard pep talk by any means. No, Doc would pull directly from his life experience and be honest and direct – as well as show his vulnerability. Many of his stories were about his father, who was a police officer, and the lessons he learned from him. He would take you on an emotional roller coaster, from the bottom to the top and back down again, and I would see these legendary basketball greats getting all pumped up. As for me, I would just try to contain myself; in the middle of one of his talks, I just wanted to yell, “Let me out there now! Please let me out there now! You don’t have to say anything else, Doc, just let me out there now!”
Keyon Dooling: What I loved about (Doc Rivers) was that he didn’t sweat the small things. If you didn’t want to practice in a shirt, you didn’t have to. If you wanted to listen to your music on the plane, you could go ahead. He wasn’t tripping off dress code or anything that didn’t impact the big picture. But when you had a job to do in the weight room, on the court, in a professional setting? It was, “Do your f—ing job!” That’s because he had only one team rule – and it only had one word in it: Respect. Respect your trainer’s time. You have a massage set up, be there on time. Respect the equipment guys’ job – don’t leave your stuff all raggedy, put it in the bin. The message was that people worked hard for us – and we should do our part to help them do what they did for us. Doc held you accountable.
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Somewhere, deep within his heart and mind, Dooling buried a torment from his past. As an innocent 7-year-old, he was abused sexually by a teenaged family friend. He kept the secret from his family, later from his wife. Carrying that weight for 25 years took a dreadful toll. As a pre-teen, he started carrying a knife for protection. He drank. He smoked. Above all, he kept quiet. “I was embarrassed about it, so I literally pushed it so far down in my mind it really didn’t exist to me. [Carrying the secret] was a lot harder than I gave it credit for,” said Dooling, now 34. “I didn’t even self-evaluate until I got away from ball and got into a mental institution and found the healing I needed. I needed basic, traditional therapy.”
He has set up RespectFoundation55.org with its multi-tiered website to offer help. There are national, regional, local hotlines for support groups of sexual abuse victims. Dooling goes on speaking engagements, has told his story on national TV. He targets kids – but offers support to all ages. “It’s a wide range, because sexual abuse happens so frequently in our younger days, but what I’m finding as I go out more and more is we’re dealing with adults who don’t know how to embrace what I’ve been able to do,” Dooling said. “I want to let them know there is a light at the end of the tunnel. I believe you have to seek healing through mental wellness, therapy, support.”