Manute Bol Rumors

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For historical context, Whiteside’s blocked shots average would be the highest in the NBA since Alonzo Mourning averaged 3.91 for the Heat in 1998-99, when a lockout shortened the season to 50 games. Over a full 82-game season, Whiteside’s average would be the highest since Dikembe Mutombo swatted away 4.49 per game in 1995-96. In the 42 seasons since the NBA first started tracking blocks as a statistic, the league leader has averaged at least 4.0 blocks per game on 13 occasions. But all 13 happened over the first 23 seasons (1973-1996). Mark Eaton did it three times, and Dikembe Mutombo, Hakeem Olajuwon and Manute Bol achieved it twice apiece.
Former Bullets center Manute Bol is being honored with a life-size bobblehead and a larger-than-normal bobblehead giveaway in Oakland on Tuesday. The first 10,000 fans at Oracle Arena for the Warriors-Bulls game will receive a 10-inch bobblehead of Bol, who was traded to the Warriors in 1988 after playing the first three seasons of his career in Washington. The Warriors will also unveil a 7-foot-7 bobblehead of Bol on the main concourse as part of a promotion to raise money for the team’s community foundation.
Reyes shakes his head. His hope is that one day the brothers will connect. That a firmer bond grows through time. “I know Manute was very proud of Madut playing at St. Anthony’s and it’s something Manute would tell me all of the time,” Reyes said. “I think it hurt Manute that he didn’t have a stronger relationship with Madut. In talking to Madut himself, it’s something I sense he regrets, too; that he wasn’t as close to his father as he could have been. Bol was a second chance for Manute to a better father than he was with his older boys, and he was, he really was.” Sometime this summer, Bol is hoping to return to the Sudan and visit his father’s grave. It’s a trip Madut is thinking about, too. “My father was a giving person, and he thought about others before himself. That’s the way I want to be,” Bol said. “You know, I can still hear his voice in my head, especially when I look at his pictures.”
It was too late. Just as he was walking out of the house, Madut received the call that his father had died. He made it for the funeral. Each morning, Madut wakes up to look at a picture of his father prominently placed on his apartment wall. He carries a picture of his dad in his wallet, a shot of a Sudanese sunset that includes his father’s name, date of birth and death. He also lugs something else. “Every day I wake up just feeling guilty, even though people tell me I shouldn’t,” Madut said. “I think he wanted to be more a part of my life. I forgave him. I wake up and think about him and let him know that I’m sorry. I do feel guilty. I wasn’t able to be there.”