Manute Bol Rumors

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For historical context, Whiteside’s blocked shots average would be the highest in the NBA since Alonzo Mourning averaged 3.91 for the Heat in 1998-99, when a lockout shortened the season to 50 games. Over a full 82-game season, Whiteside’s average would be the highest since Dikembe Mutombo swatted away 4.49 per game in 1995-96. In the 42 seasons since the NBA first started tracking blocks as a statistic, the league leader has averaged at least 4.0 blocks per game on 13 occasions. But all 13 happened over the first 23 seasons (1973-1996). Mark Eaton did it three times, and Dikembe Mutombo, Hakeem Olajuwon and Manute Bol achieved it twice apiece.
Former Bullets center Manute Bol is being honored with a life-size bobblehead and a larger-than-normal bobblehead giveaway in Oakland on Tuesday. The first 10,000 fans at Oracle Arena for the Warriors-Bulls game will receive a 10-inch bobblehead of Bol, who was traded to the Warriors in 1988 after playing the first three seasons of his career in Washington. The Warriors will also unveil a 7-foot-7 bobblehead of Bol on the main concourse as part of a promotion to raise money for the team’s community foundation.
Bol is being mentored by Val Reyes, his AAU coach. Reyes has received job offers from all over the country, suggesting that he move and bring Bol with him. He plans to stay put. Reyes, the father of six boys, has been like a second dad to Bol. “Bol’s first practice, he was around 8 or 9 and scared to go to the gym,” Reyes recalled. “I told him before he went in to tell everyone he’s Bol Bol, Manute Bol’s son, and since then, he’s been fine. He just wants to be himself. He likes to have fun. We were in a tournament in Houston and he came jumping out at me in the dark like a spider one time. It’s exactly something his father would do. He likes to play and joke around. I couldn’t care less whether he plays basketball or not. I made a promise to his father. “I just want Bol to be successful at anything he wants to do. Education is the most important thing, because Manute was building schools in the Sudan for children. I bring it up to Bol; how would it look if he didn’t follow up with his own education? I’ve stressed to him that his father would want him to graduate college.”
Madut and Bol Bol are the spitting image of their father, Manute – the 7-7 Dinka tribe anomaly and owner of one of the most ungainly three-point strokes known to man (he once made six treys in a 1993 game at Phoenix while with the Sixers). Manute played 10 years in the NBA for four teams, including two stints in Philadelphia, and his humanitarian work in his native Sudan is world-renowned. Manute was just 47 when he died June 19, 2010, in Charlottesville, Va., of acute kidney failure complicated by a skin disease known as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. He is survived by 10 children – six with his first wife, Atong, four with his second wife, Ajok – including his two basketball-playing sons. Madut Bol, Manute’s eldest son, is a 6-9, 200-pound senior center at Southern University in Baton Rouge, La. Bol Bol, 13, is from Olathe, Kan. At 6-4 1/2, he’s considered one of the best in the country in his age group.