Michael Jordan Rumors

All NBA Players

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The site lay more-or-less dormant for the next 14 years. But that changed for good in late 2010, when the Internet, exponentially bigger than it was in 1996, rediscovered the site – almost entirely unchanged from its initial launch. It was reborn as a viral sensation, the web’s equivalent of a recently discovered cave painting. We laughed at the site because we couldn’t believe anything was ever designed this way, but also because it still existed. It remains one of the most faithful living documents of early web design that anyone can access online. Today, the Space Jam site’s popularity has outlived almost everything to which it has been connected. The Fifth Avenue store shuttered in 2001. Both stars of the movie’s stars made forgettable exits in 2003 – Jordan with the Washington Wizards, Bugs with Looney Tunes: Back in Action. And every person directly associated with the site’s creation has now left the studio.
via Rolling Stone
But what was seen, more than anything, was Braun’s design. Working from a top-of-the-line Apple Macintosh and using BBEdit to code, DeBabelizer to compress and shrink JPGs and GIFs, and Photoshop and Illustrator to create design elements – all programs still very much in use today – Braun helped bring a cinematic world to life. And though today’s standards may only enhance its apparent simplicity, the site is, in many ways, a technical marvel. Years before virtual reality became chic, the team went out West and created a 360-degree tour of the “Jordan Dome” – the practice enclosure/basketball court built on the Warner Bros. lot to capture the NBA stars’ footage – by setting up a tripod during off-hours, capturing images every 15 degrees and then stitching them together into a QuickTime VR file. There was a “coloring book” with downloadable black-and-white sketches, and a 5,000-word section on the various technologies that helped make the movie. There was an online quiz before online quizzes were popular, and all of the WAV, AIFF and QuickTime files are still functional and ready for download. (There are also some undiscovered Easter eggs the team is reluctant to disclose, even two decades later.)
via Rolling Stone
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Michael Jordan has been forced to wait an extra day before jurors begin deliberating in his federal court case against defunct supermarket chain Dominick’s. U.S. District Judge John Blakey delayed closing arguments at the end of the six-day trial until Friday morning. Both sides finished presenting evidence Wednesday, but Blakey decided he needed Thursday to oversee arguments about the instructions he will give jurors. Dominick’s was previously found liable by the court for using Jordan’s name and identity without permission in a 2009 special issue of Sports Illustrated. Jurors must decide how much Dominick’s owner Safeway must pay for the gaffe. Jordan and his advisers say the rights Dominick’s took without permission were worth $10 million, but an expert hired by Dominick’s put the fair price at just $126,900.
via Chicago Tribune
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Forget the $10 million Michael Jordan says the use of his name and identity is worth — it’s only worth $126,900, a sports economics expert hired by the defunct supermarket chain Dominick’s testified in federal court Wednesday morning. Rodney Fort, a University of Michigan professor of sports management, said Jordan and his advisers wildly overestimated the value of a single-page ad in a 2009 special issue of Sports Illustrated in which Dominick’s used Jordan’s name and identity without permission. The fair market value of the one-time use of Jordan’s identity “could be no more than $126,900,” Fort testified.
via Chicago Tribune