Paul Millsap Rumors

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#4
Paul Millsap
Paul Millsap
Position: F-C
Born: 02/10/85
Height: 6-8 / 2.03
Weight:244 lbs. / 111.1 kg.
Salary: $30,769,231
The Nuggets have already beaten Portland twice. And they’ve been good defensively in doing so. Overall, they are playing some of their most effective basketball in keeping themselves alive in the playoff race with a season-high five straight victories. “I think we’re playing our best overall basketball,” forward Paul Millsap said. “Not necessarily the best offense that we’ve played all year. Not necessarily the best defense. But to be a good team we’ve got to have balance, and I think now, coming down the stretch, we have good balance, offense and defense.”
LeBron James had a ton of praise for Villanova’s Donte DiVincenzo when asked about the NCAA title game. “Listen, that kid, he was on fire,” James said Tuesday. “But he did it in an all (around way). First of all, he made himself a lot of money. That’s the first thing I thought. Obviously, I’m not with the whole college thing so I don’t care about that. He made himself a lot of money last night and not because of the way he was shooting, but he was doing it all. He was getting into the lane, and-1s. Backdoors. Lobs. Verticality with Matthews at the peak, showing his athleticism. And then when the game started to kind of get (close) when Michigan cut it to 12, boom, he hits another backbreaker. Michigan kind of gets it to 10, boom, he shows up again. Man, listen, at the end of the day, Villanova was the best team in college basketball this year and when the National Player of the Year is on the sideline with four fouls for the majority of the second half and you’re still winning? That lets you know how great of a team you are. So, Donte, obviously he was great. The kid (Mikal) Bridges, he was shooting the heck out of the ball. That one kid, No. 4, I call him ‘Baby Millsap,’ (Eric) Paschall, I call him Baby Millsap. Listen, he’s a matchup problem. But the best team won and I’m actually happy they won a little bit because we don’t really speak that other team’s name around here. But I do feel, I feel for the kids though.”
2 weeks ago via ESPN
Millsap defined Jokic being aggressive as him, “going into his actions with pace and just being himself.” Upon further research, it seems that Millsap’s definition is as spot-on as it gets for such a nebulous ideology to define. It is Millsap himself who is likely the person who best knows how to play through Jokic. “We talk about it,” Millsap said when asked about if he and Jokic have had conversations about getting Jokic to be more aggressive. “I think that is my main goal; especially starting games off before tip-off. Just telling him to just be himself and to be aggressive and, when he does that, great things happen.”
Early in Monday’s double-overtime heartbreaker at Miami, Nuggets’ forward Paul Millsap pump-faked to get defender James Johnson in the air. And then the four-time all-star froze. “I didn’t know how to finish,” Millsap said. “I was so hesitant to finish with my left hand that (Johnson) ended up catching up and blocking my shot. Simple things like that have been tough for me to adjust to.”
Nuggets coach Michael Malone has repeatedly expressed sympathy for Millsap, saying his personal reintegration has been “a greater challenge than I think anybody would ever realize.” But that’s created a bit of a conundrum for the coach — trying to get Millsap back in form while also trying to prevent a trickle-down effect that disrupts an offense that was one of the NBA’s best in February. “You can tell he’s not 100 percent,” Malone said. “He’s not the Paul Millsap that we signed this summer, that played before he got hurt, because he is limited. He’s not able to play as effectively as he has been his whole career. “It’s a fine line of going to him and trying to help him get into a rhythm, but not also putting a burden on him where he feels like he has to carry a load. Because I don’t know if he’s ready to carry that load.”