Shane Battier Rumors

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Shane Battier
Shane Battier
Position: None
Born: 09/09/78
Height: 6-8 / 2.03
Weight:229 lbs. / 104.3 kg.
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Shane Battier (former NBA player): I remember getting the invitation to go to the President’s [49th] birthday party. Anytime you get a special email from the white house, you kind of hold your breath for a second. Like, What’d I do wrong? But when I opened up, it explained that the President was going to have a basketball birthday party, no different than my eight-year-old son. And I thought, “Wow, this is sort of like being invited to the cool dude table.” You always heard about the legendary pickup games, and I was a college teammate of Reggie Love, so I think he put in a good word for me. Marty Nesbitt: Everybody was there. Chris Paul, Joakim Noah, Derrick Rose, Lebron James, Carmelo Anthony, Grant Hill, Magic, Bill Russell, Kobe.
2 days ago via GQ.com
Shane Battier: We went through security, and then we got in cars and vans on the grounds and went over to the naval base where the game was going to be held. And that was probably the most exciting part: We got these Navy SEALS driving us—I think it was Alonzo Mourning and Carmelo Anthony and Chris Paul—and they were doing offensive driving with us in the back, ripping through turns. Judging by all the security and the car it took to get there, it was probably the safest place we could have been in the entire world. There’s a code when you’re shooting around with a bunch of guys, getting ready for a game. They talk a little differently, they walk a little differently. Especially at the NBA level. I don’t know how to explain it, but that’s what I was most impressed with about the President. He fit right in. I think that’s maybe one of the most defining attributes of his eight years. He could talk to really any group. He could make you feel like he was one of you.
2 days ago via GQ.com
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Shane Battier: I would argue that the true value of any degree is the alumni network that shares that same degree. The saying, “It’s not what you know, but who you know,” is becoming more true every day. Networking matters. Maybe more than ever. For the most part, alumni networks strictly benefit the universities and athletic program budgets that inspire them. But what if universities began leveraging alumni networks for the benefit of the athletes. I’m talking about programs that match up athletes with alumni capable of providing genuine mentorship, networking opportunities and internships. That’s the kind of thing that will actually give student-athletes practical directions in careers outside of their sports.
Shane Battier: That is why I think the alumni base should be utilized more as an added benefit for student-athletes. It would be a way to recruit kids not just based on top coaches, trainers and facilities, but also because of the potential to have relationships facilitated with a rich alumni network that will set the student up for success in their post-career. Every school has an area of expertise — an industry they are proud to trumpet.
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The NBA and USA Basketball have partnered to develop a first-ever set of youth basketball guidelines to enhance the way children, parents and coaches experience the game, emphasizing the importance of player health and wellness, the NBA announced Monday. The recommended playing and rest guidelines — which have been endorsed by a handful of organizations such as AAU, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Adidas, Nike, Under Armour and the NCAA — were established over the past six months by three working groups (health and wellness, playing standards and curriculum and instruction) made up of coaches, administrators, former players (including retired NBA champions Shane Battier and Bruce Bowen) and leading medical experts from around the world.