Tim Duncan Rumors

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Tim Duncan
Tim Duncan
Position: F-C
Born: 04/25/76
Height: 6-11 / 2.11
Weight:259 lbs. / 117.9 kg.
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Tim Duncan will be back on the court for the Spurs next season. The 39-year-old Spurs captain on Thursday told the Express-News that a chance to sit down with Gregg Popovich on Wednesday led him to his decision to return for a 19th season in silver and black. Duncan, a two-time Most Valuable Player and three-time NBA Finals MVP, was part of a Spurs contingent that met in Los Angeles on Wednesday with free agent big man LaMarcus Aldridge in an attempt to induce him to sign on with the team. It was during the trip to L.A that he had a chance to sit down with the only NBA head coach for whom he has played.
Tim Duncan will join Tony Parker and Gregg Popovich as part of the San Antonio Spurs’ contingent when they meet with Portland Trail Blazers free agent LaMarcus Aldridge on Wednesday morning in Los Angeles, a source told Yahoo Sports. Duncan’s decision to join the group is another indication of his willingness to play at least one more season. He and Manu Ginobili are among several free agents the Spurs have this summer. Duncan and Ginobili have yet to formally announce their plans.
Although Duncan and fellow Spurs mainstay Manu Ginobili have yet to make a formal declaration about their plans for next season, sources told ESPN.com that the Spurs are optimistic about re-signing both at salaries that will also allow them to re-sign prized restricted free agent Kawhi Leonard this summer as well as pursue top-tier free agent LaMarcus Aldridge.
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There are several NBA player personnel executives who believe the Spurs will offer Duncan a two-year contract that begins between $6 million and $7 million, with a partial guarantee and a player option in the second season. If Duncan doesn’t exercise the option, he gets, say, 50 percent of that season’s salary. In effect, his salary for next season would remain over $10 million, the partially guaranteed portion of the second season’s salary remaining on the Spurs team salary after the cap explodes with the NBA’s new TV money kicking in for 2016-17. “You can call it a ‘wink-wink’ deal if you want to,” an Eastern Conference team executive said. “It’s what they did with (Antonio) McDyess, so why not for Duncan?” Duncan’s cap hold is slightly more than $15.5 million, so such a two-year deal would drop their team salary by more than $8 million.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 7 more rumors
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“I think they’re both going to play one more year,” Parker told the Express-News on Wednesday. Duncan, 39, and Ginobili, 37, are among the 10 Spurs who will see their contracts expire on July 1. Neither has formally announced a decision to return or retire. Parker admits his opinion about keeping the trio intact next season is a bit of wishful thinking. “I’m trying to be positive,” he said with a chuckle after an appearance at his annual basketball camp at George Gervin Academy.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 7 more rumors
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In January, Duncan sued his former financial adviser, Charles Banks, accusing him of pushing him into investments despite conflicts of interest that ultimately caused substantial loss. Banks hid his own interest in investment opportunities recommended to the 15-time All-Star, according to the complaint. The losses from 2005-2013 were discovered during a review of Duncan’s finances as part of his divorce, the player said. “I trusted someone to do a job that I hired them to do and they misused my trust and went astray and started using my money,” Duncan said in the phone interview, noting that he’s speaking out to dispel Banks’s assertions that the losses stemmed from a misunderstanding or that he was impatient and wanted out of certain investments.
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The promise of a multimillion-dollar contract won’t be a factor in whether Tim Duncan returns for his 19th National Basketball Association season, even though the San Antonio Spurs’ All-Star lost more than $20 million to what he says is a dishonest financial adviser. “Luckily I had a long career and made good money,” the 39-year-old Duncan, who has been paid about $220 million over his career, including about $10 million this past season, said in a telephone interview. “This is a big chunk, but it’s not going to change my life in any way. It’s not going to make any decisions for me.”
But, a former financial advisor he’s suing in Bexar County for more than $1 million wants a federal judge to force Duncan to arbitration in California, or to move a portion of the suit to Colorado. U.S. District Judge Xavier Rodriguez has scheduled a hearing for Wednesday to take up motions by defendant Charles Banks, who says the investment agreements Duncan signed specify that all disputes over Duncan’s investments in hotel and winery businesses must go to arbitration in San Francisco or Los Angeles.
Duncan has been most consistent, however, with martial arts. He works with a local trainer named Jason Echols, and what Duncan contributed for Echols’ website addresses Grover’s theory. “I’ve used many different forms of off-season conditioning throughout my career,” Duncan wrote, “but have found my training with Jason to be the longest lasting because of its ever-changing and challenging workouts.” Echols doesn’t pretend to have all the answers. But he’s always been an advocate of this kind of training because, as he put it, “it grounds an athlete.” He loves the cross-training potential. “It increases your hand-eye coordination, literally connecting your brain to your body,” Echols said Saturday. “And when you put it in the hands of someone like Tim Duncan, it can turn into magic.”
Duncan’s body seemed to be saying that around 2010. Given the status of his left knee, surgically repaired in the summer of 2000, his decline seemed to come at an appropriate time. Duncan reacted by changing his diet, and he continued to go to the Spurs’ practice facility to work on his game. But just as his athletic career began in swimming, he continued to search for ways to vary his activity. When he hasn’t been lifting tractor tires, he’s been boxing. James Leija has monitored the latter. He will again starting next month, and he thinks it is this dedication that saves Duncan. Leija says Duncan is like Floyd Mayweather in that he never stops training. “Most guys get hurt because they are out of shape and trying to get it back,” Leija said Saturday. “Tim never gets out of shape.”