Tim Hardaway Rumors

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Kentucky coach John Calipari and four-time NBA Defensive Player of the Year Dikembe Mutombo are among the finalists for the Basketball Hall of Fame’s 2015 class. The Hall of Fame announced its 2015 nominees Saturday. The Class of 2015 will be announced April 6. Calipari and Mutombo are joined by longtime NBA referee Dick Bavetta, five-time NBA All-Star Tim Hardaway, three-time All-Star Kevin Johnson, three-time WNBA MVP Lisa Leslie, Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan, seven-time All-Star Jo Jo White, four-time All-Star Spencer Haywood, former NBA coach Bill Fitch and high school coaches Robert Hughes and Leta Andrews as finalists.
The last time Tim Hardaway coached, he was a father first. This time, the former Miami Heat guard has made the craft a professional priority. And he’s having a blast, finding a calling nearly as fulfilling as those step-back 3-pointers with the Heat or killer crossovers with the Golden State Warriors. “It’s great,” Hardaway said, as he settles into his first season as an NBA assistant coach, working on Stan Van Gundy’s staff with the Detroit Pistons. “I’m learning. And the players relate. They understand I went out there and I did it.”
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Of course, most of Hardaway’s Pistons players weren’t even born during his Run TMC days with the Warriors, were too young to appreciate how he led the Heat into those fierce Heat playoff battles against the New York Knicks, for whom his son now plays. “Actually,” he said, “they try to emulate my move, the crossover. And they want me to teach it to ’em. They know that I could still go out there and show them some stuff at real pace, real time. “I’m an old guy, but not a dinosaur. They still can relate to me because I was around my son, and I was at the Michigan games and they saw me there, and they still can relate to me as a basketball player, too.”
Hardaway — who will join Brendan Malone, Bob Beyer, Charles Klask and former Heat forward Malik Allen on Van Gundy’s staff — said a coaching job on Erik Spoelstra’s staff wasn’t realistic because “there are guys before me here and I didn’t want to take anything from them.” The Heat acquired Hardaway and Chris Gatling from Golden State, for Kevin Willis and Bimbo Coles, in a midseason trade in 1995-96, and Hardaway and Mourning — over the next 5 ½ seasons — led the Heat to its most success as a franchise up to that point, though kidney disease sidelined Mourning for most of Hardaway’s final season with the team.
Tim Hardaway, who combined with Alonzo Mourning to help lead the Heat to four consecutive Atlantic Division titles and was at the epicenter of the compelling Heat-Knicks rivalry during that era, said Thursday he is leaving his job as a Heat scout to become an assistant coach on Stan Van Gundy’s staff in Detroit. “I’m ecstatic,” he told me this afternoon. “It’s something I wanted to do. It’s all about teaching. I’m good at teaching and understanding players.” And he was comfortable with Van Gundy, who was an assistant coach during Hardaway’s time with the Heat. “Stan and I have great rapport. [Heat president] Pat Riley said it’s a great thing for me and he’s happy for me.”
With Anthony sitting this one out, the Knicks have no player on Team USA (Tim Hardaway Jr. is on the practice team in Las Vegas training camp). But Prigioni is excited Anthony rejoined his team in New York. “When I saw Melo re-sign, the first thing I did was send him a message saying that I was so happy to have a chance to still play with him,” Prigioni said. “And I told him that I’m sure we will play much better next season.”
The NBA doesn’t have a Hall of Fame, leaving the duty of honoring its all-time greats to the Basketball Hall of Fame – an organization hung up on honoring players and coaches (way too many coaches) based on accomplishments at lesser levels. Its processes are both screwed up and secretive (though maybe the former will get marginally better). Advice: Never predict who will be enshrined, and don’t dwell on who should be enshrined. It doesn’t make sense and won’t make sense. But that doesn’t mean we can’t take a few moments to honor those elected in what’s still a huge honor. Five former NBA players were finalists this year, and two were reportedly elected. In: Alonzo Mourning Mitch Richmond Out: Tim Hardaway Kevin Johnson Spencer Haywood
Jackson revealed during his introductory press conference that he’s been watching the team since Tyson Chandler went down with a leg fracture in early November. A source with knowledge of Jackson’s thinking said he was impressed with the play of Carmelo Anthony, Chandler, Iman Shumpert, Cole Aldrich, Tim Hardaway Jr. and Toure’ Murry.
As a boy, Hardaway Sr. had used the game as an escape from a tough neighborhood. His circumstances were part of his motivation. He wanted to get out. But what was motivating his son? As a result, Hardaway Sr. felt it was up to him to drive his son, to manufacture desire by pushing and prodding. It nearly destroyed their relationship. They sometimes went weeks without speaking to each other. “I was trying to make him want the game as badly as I wanted it,” Hardaway Sr. said.
The New York Knicks are pursuing Toronto point guard Kyle Lowry with a package of Raymond Felton, Metta World Peace and a 2018 first-round draft pick, league sources told Yahoo Sports. The Knicks refused a Raptors proposal that would’ve included Iman Shumpert and Felton, sources told Yahoo Sports. WIthout a first-round pick or Shumpert, there is no traction for a deal. The Knicks have no appetite for including Shumpert or rookie Tim Hardaway Jr. in a package.
Hardaway Sr. admits he put too much pressure on his son and that he almost ruined his career and his family in the process. “I wanted him to play like I played,” Hardaway Sr. said. “I wanted him to take the game seriously — not saying that he didn’t — but I wanted him to do more. I was tearing up the family and I wasn’t having fun. I wanted him to enjoy the game of basketball and what I was doing, I wasn’t letting him enjoy it and I wasn’t enjoying it either. “I had to really check my ego at the door. I had to really look at myself in the mirror. And one day, junior year, I apologized to him. I said ‘I’m sorry, I’ve been too hard on you.’ It helped us out as a family.”
Tim Hardaway regrets anti-gay comments made in 2007, but believes they resulted in dialogue that advanced society. “What I said and how I said it, it was bad,” Hardaway said. “But I think it opened up a lot of eyes and made people really, really understand that these are people and that we shouldn’t bash them or throw rocks at them or anything like that. I think that opened up a lot of eyes, opened up a lot of dialogue to which people didn’t even want to touch (before). Now, I think they will touch it. I’m not saying that it’s a good thing (the comments were made), but, if I didn’t say that, I think we still would be further back.”
Over the past several years, Hardaway has provided support at several gay events. When Jason Collins earlier this year became the first active NBA player to reveal he is gay, Hardaway called Collins the day the news broke to offer his support. Hardaway earlier this month was the first signer of a petition seeking the legalization of gay marriage in Florida. “I’ve changed a lot,” Hardaway said. “I hear my (2007) comments today and I cringe because those were bad comments. It was like I was telling people to go bully them, beat them up, you can commit suicide, all the bad things, and that’s the way it sounded. I wanted to make amends to myself and make amends to everybody and make sure that they understand totally that wasn’t me. I made a big mistake and I just wanted to change it.”
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Whereas Hardaway’s radio comments were the result of being, in a sense, back on the court, where he was utterly fearless and often led with considerable swagger and ego. He was being macho, responding as macho guys are “expected” to respond. He now responds from an informed point of view. “Once I started reading about what was happening with these people — kids getting beat up, bullied and committing suicide — I realized I made it OK for people to keep ridiculing them,” he said. “And I felt bad about it.”
In the wake of his previous comments — made shortly after another retired NBA player, John Amaechi, revealed he is gay — a contrite Hardaway was introduced by a mutual friend to Vanessa Brito, a lesbian activist in Miami. She explained the potentially far-reaching ramifications of hate speech, which can incite bullies and traumatize those struggling with identity. Hardaway hadn’t bothered to consider any of that. “With what I said, people could think it’s OK to throw rocks at them or bully them,” Hardaway said. “I just wanted to make people understand that what I said wasn’t cool. I wanted to make amends for it.”
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It was, you may recall, Hardaway who during a 2007 radio interview said he “hated” gay people, didn’t want to be near them and wouldn’t bother to hide his revulsion. To reiterate, the former Warriors star, then three years into retirement and living in Florida, added a two-word exclamation point: “I’m homophobic.” I asked Tim this week to convey what was on his mind at the time. He said “nothing,” and there is every reason to take him literally. His evolution, then, is not so much a matter of political expedience but of mind engagement. With the benefits of education and awareness, Hardaway has spent much of his time since as a beacon of tolerance and unity. “We need to respect them as human beings who should have the same rights as any other human beings,” Hardaway said.
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Former NBA star Tim Hardaway tonight is scheduled to become the first petition-signer on the Equal Marriage Florida effort to put a proposed constitutional amendment legalizing same-sex marriage in the state on the November 2014 ballot. Hardaway, a member of some great Miami Heat teams in the 1990s, plans to sign the petition at 7 p.m. at Scully’s Tavern in the Kendall area. The campaign must gather more than 680,000 signatures from registered voters to have a chance to get on the ballot.
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“Man, helped Jason Kidd with his coaching,” Hardaway said at the Knicks training facility in Greenburgh Friday after his son, Tim Hardaway Jr., was introduced as the team’s first-round draft pick. “Now he really don’t have to coach. He’s got guys out there that can coach themselves. Even with Deron Williams, and now you’ve got Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett, they can police the team. They’re proven winners, they’re established winners. They want to win. They put two or three guys with Terry there too, all he’s got to do is just go out there and make sure they run an offense, make sure they’re playing defense. They’re going to police themselves.”
The Brooklyn Nets will host pre-draft workouts on Monday, June 24 at the PNY Center in East Rutherford, N.J. The workouts will be closed to the media, however General Manager Billy King and prospects will be available following the session. Below is a list of participating players: Erick Green, Tim Hardaway Jr, Dennis Tinnon, Demetrius Conger, Giovan Oniangue, Dwayne Davis