Tim Hardaway Rumors

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Kentucky coach John Calipari and four-time NBA Defensive Player of the Year Dikembe Mutombo are among the finalists for the Basketball Hall of Fame’s 2015 class. The Hall of Fame announced its 2015 nominees Saturday. The Class of 2015 will be announced April 6. Calipari and Mutombo are joined by longtime NBA referee Dick Bavetta, five-time NBA All-Star Tim Hardaway, three-time All-Star Kevin Johnson, three-time WNBA MVP Lisa Leslie, Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan, seven-time All-Star Jo Jo White, four-time All-Star Spencer Haywood, former NBA coach Bill Fitch and high school coaches Robert Hughes and Leta Andrews as finalists.
The last time Tim Hardaway coached, he was a father first. This time, the former Miami Heat guard has made the craft a professional priority. And he’s having a blast, finding a calling nearly as fulfilling as those step-back 3-pointers with the Heat or killer crossovers with the Golden State Warriors. “It’s great,” Hardaway said, as he settles into his first season as an NBA assistant coach, working on Stan Van Gundy’s staff with the Detroit Pistons. “I’m learning. And the players relate. They understand I went out there and I did it.”
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Of course, most of Hardaway’s Pistons players weren’t even born during his Run TMC days with the Warriors, were too young to appreciate how he led the Heat into those fierce Heat playoff battles against the New York Knicks, for whom his son now plays. “Actually,” he said, “they try to emulate my move, the crossover. And they want me to teach it to ’em. They know that I could still go out there and show them some stuff at real pace, real time. “I’m an old guy, but not a dinosaur. They still can relate to me because I was around my son, and I was at the Michigan games and they saw me there, and they still can relate to me as a basketball player, too.”
Hardaway — who will join Brendan Malone, Bob Beyer, Charles Klask and former Heat forward Malik Allen on Van Gundy’s staff — said a coaching job on Erik Spoelstra’s staff wasn’t realistic because “there are guys before me here and I didn’t want to take anything from them.” The Heat acquired Hardaway and Chris Gatling from Golden State, for Kevin Willis and Bimbo Coles, in a midseason trade in 1995-96, and Hardaway and Mourning — over the next 5 ½ seasons — led the Heat to its most success as a franchise up to that point, though kidney disease sidelined Mourning for most of Hardaway’s final season with the team.
Tim Hardaway, who combined with Alonzo Mourning to help lead the Heat to four consecutive Atlantic Division titles and was at the epicenter of the compelling Heat-Knicks rivalry during that era, said Thursday he is leaving his job as a Heat scout to become an assistant coach on Stan Van Gundy’s staff in Detroit. “I’m ecstatic,” he told me this afternoon. “It’s something I wanted to do. It’s all about teaching. I’m good at teaching and understanding players.” And he was comfortable with Van Gundy, who was an assistant coach during Hardaway’s time with the Heat. “Stan and I have great rapport. [Heat president] Pat Riley said it’s a great thing for me and he’s happy for me.”
With Anthony sitting this one out, the Knicks have no player on Team USA (Tim Hardaway Jr. is on the practice team in Las Vegas training camp). But Prigioni is excited Anthony rejoined his team in New York. “When I saw Melo re-sign, the first thing I did was send him a message saying that I was so happy to have a chance to still play with him,” Prigioni said. “And I told him that I’m sure we will play much better next season.”
The NBA doesn’t have a Hall of Fame, leaving the duty of honoring its all-time greats to the Basketball Hall of Fame – an organization hung up on honoring players and coaches (way too many coaches) based on accomplishments at lesser levels. Its processes are both screwed up and secretive (though maybe the former will get marginally better). Advice: Never predict who will be enshrined, and don’t dwell on who should be enshrined. It doesn’t make sense and won’t make sense. But that doesn’t mean we can’t take a few moments to honor those elected in what’s still a huge honor. Five former NBA players were finalists this year, and two were reportedly elected. In: Alonzo Mourning Mitch Richmond Out: Tim Hardaway Kevin Johnson Spencer Haywood
Jackson revealed during his introductory press conference that he’s been watching the team since Tyson Chandler went down with a leg fracture in early November. A source with knowledge of Jackson’s thinking said he was impressed with the play of Carmelo Anthony, Chandler, Iman Shumpert, Cole Aldrich, Tim Hardaway Jr. and Toure’ Murry.
As a boy, Hardaway Sr. had used the game as an escape from a tough neighborhood. His circumstances were part of his motivation. He wanted to get out. But what was motivating his son? As a result, Hardaway Sr. felt it was up to him to drive his son, to manufacture desire by pushing and prodding. It nearly destroyed their relationship. They sometimes went weeks without speaking to each other. “I was trying to make him want the game as badly as I wanted it,” Hardaway Sr. said.
The New York Knicks are pursuing Toronto point guard Kyle Lowry with a package of Raymond Felton, Metta World Peace and a 2018 first-round draft pick, league sources told Yahoo Sports. The Knicks refused a Raptors proposal that would’ve included Iman Shumpert and Felton, sources told Yahoo Sports. WIthout a first-round pick or Shumpert, there is no traction for a deal. The Knicks have no appetite for including Shumpert or rookie Tim Hardaway Jr. in a package.
Hardaway Sr. admits he put too much pressure on his son and that he almost ruined his career and his family in the process. “I wanted him to play like I played,” Hardaway Sr. said. “I wanted him to take the game seriously — not saying that he didn’t — but I wanted him to do more. I was tearing up the family and I wasn’t having fun. I wanted him to enjoy the game of basketball and what I was doing, I wasn’t letting him enjoy it and I wasn’t enjoying it either. “I had to really check my ego at the door. I had to really look at myself in the mirror. And one day, junior year, I apologized to him. I said ‘I’m sorry, I’ve been too hard on you.’ It helped us out as a family.”