Vince Carter Rumors

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Vince Carter
Vince Carter
Position: F-G
Born: 01/26/77
Height: 6-6 / 1.98
Weight:225 lbs. / 102.1 kg.
Salary: $4,088,019
He’s the fourth-oldest player in the NBA behind only Andre Miller, Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett. Carter loves basketball, and he’s continuing to play it – on his terms, which is just fine for Memphis. “He doesn’t take advantage of any of his celebrity as far as big-timing people or anything like that,” Grizzlies coach Dave Joerger said. “He’s one of the nicest, down-to-earth guys. He loves coming to the gym every day. He loves working with younger guys, older guys, sitting around after practice, after games, just talking hoops. He’s the kind of guy who doesn’t have to do that, right? He’s set, and he’s had a great career, and hopefully, he goes to the Hall of Fame. But he just love it.”
The fans of the Raptors appeared to be coming to grips with his larger impact on their country by the time Carter made his latest return to Toronto in November. A sentimental and rousing video of Carter’s seven seasons as a Raptor was shown during a first-quarter timeout. The boos of previous years gave way to a standing ovation. He was crying. “That’s something that was not talked about at the time,” said Carter of his unexpected influence on Canadian basketball. “We weren’t saying get us here because of 10 years later, this is what’s going to become of it. Nobody imagined that. I was glad I could have an impact, to be a part of that. But I had no idea. No idea.” “Ladies and gentlemen,” the announcement was made that November night at the Air Canada Centre, “would you please welcome back Vince Carter.”
It was as if Carter had been nominated to campaign for a role that he could not refuse. He never did look comfortable. “I didn’t want be the next anybody,” said Carter. He was starring for an expansion franchise with no pedigree in a country that was, at that time, entirely foreign to the NBA. There was little to no understanding of what was being asked of him. As flattered as Carter was by the comparisons to Jordan, he didn’t recognize where the expectations were leading him until it was too late. “I knew of Michael Jordan, but I did not know him personally. So I can never be `the next,”‘ Carter said. “My approach is different from his approach, or the approach of any other player. You can try like hell to be `the next’ anyone, and copy their approach, and you’re still not going to be the same. That’s the thing I was trying to fight through — throughout my career.”
This has been Vince Carter’s hardest year. He used to average four times as many points as the 6.0 he has managed this season. His minutes are less than half of what he used to play. He was still recovering from ankle surgery as the season began, to be followed by a foot tendon injury that sidelined him all of February. “The players all respect and look up to him,” said Chris Wallace, the general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies. “How many times do you get a chance to play with an elder statesman like him? Some of these guys had his poster on the wall when they were kids.”
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When he was injured this season, Carter made several appearances on the Grizzlies’ television broadcasts as a guest analyst. As usual, he was anticipating the next phase of his life, once his playing career concludes. He would like to work in television, he said, even though he has not ruled out coaching. If only he could find a way to do both. “Maybe I could come into practice and the coach would let me help out,” he said.
To help, Carter has put in countless hours maintaining his body. He does regular leg work to try and keep as much of his spring as possible. He routinely lifts weights after practice. At home, he does daily light work- — “Old man workouts,” Carter said- — before practice to stay loose. The result: Carter played 81 games in each of his last two seasons in Dallas. “I work like hell to make sure my body is in top shape and I am able to last throughout the year,” Carter said. “The older Vince feels better at season’s end than I ever have before.”
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Carter won’t commit to playing beyond his current contract. He will be a 19-year veteran when this deal expires and admits the idea of playing 20 is intriguing. “I never would have imagined it,” Carter said. His production will dictate his future and, though limited, he still shows flashes of brilliance. Earlier this month, against San Antonio, Carter froze Tim Duncan with a hesitation dribble. He burst past Duncan with two long steps and threw a one-handed dunk down over him. Yes, old Vince is gone, but occasionally the old man can still get up.
Then, Henderson heard from Vince Carter, Tony Allen and several other players. No one would reveal how they learned about the incident. To a man, though, the players were eager to talk about why no one hesitated to help Henderson. “He’s dedicated to the Grizzlies. He’s always there when we need him,” Pondexter said. “We have to look out for our own. We say it’s a family around here, so we were looking out for a family member. I’ve had cars stolen. I didn’t grow up with any money, so I know how it is to be in that situation.”
Time heals all wounds. Just ask Vince Carter. After years of being roundly booed upon returning to Air Canada Centre, the former Toronto Raptors superstar received a standing ovation during a video tribute highlighting his time above the border. According to Raps play-by-play announcer Matt Devlin, scattered jeers turned to widespread and standing cheers as the segment was shown. Carter, a Memphis Grizzlies reserve, was understandably emotional:
Carter appreciates that the Mavs didn’t pass on him at a time when his stock wasn’t high after disappointing stints in Orlando and Phoenix. “[Mark] Cuban believed in me in the beginning when I guess a lot of people felt like I was just done or couldn’t play anymore,” Carter said. “I just got better and better. A lot of guys think when you get to that age, how can you get better? But I think I got better. I fit with this team. I think it worked and coach made it work. I was just glad to be a part of it.”