Brad Stevens a keeper in Boston

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Q: You’ve joked about it before, but are you ready to give him another six-year contract yet? Danny Ainge: [Laughs] Yeah. Q: You have to start thinking about that. Sure, we’re only in Year 3, but you can’t risk letting a good coach get away. Danny Ainge: No, listen, he’s a keeper. He’s great. He’s great to work with. Like I said, I think he’s going to be — if he stays in this game long enough — he’s going to be one of the great coaches.

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More HoopsHype Rumors
May 30, 2016 | 12:12 pm EDT Update
As the clock runs out this week on Tennessee’s infamous “jock tax,” the city of Memphis is about to turn over $2.38 million to more than 900 professional basketball players as part of a 2015 settlement. The city will return its portion of the money — a third of the $7.27 million it’s collected since Tennessee’s professional privilege tax was approved in 2009 — within the next three or four weeks, said Brian Collins, the city’s chief financial officer. “(The money) was reserved a long time ago, and it won’t have an impact on the city’s budget this year or any year,” Collins said. The city set the funds aside in fiscal year 2015.
Storyline: Taxes
The flat tax of $2,500 per game up to $7,500 for NBA and NHL players was widely criticized for eating up most — and in some cases all — of the income lower-paid athletes received from basketball games in Memphis and hockey games in Nashville. Gary Kohlman, general counsel for the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA), which sued the state over the tax, said “dozens” of players earning the legal minimum paid more in the tax than they earned from the games. “That was not an isolated event,” he said.
May 30, 2016 | 10:35 am EDT Update
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