Elton Brand an option for the Knicks?

More HoopsHype Rumors
July 28, 2015 | 10:18 am EDT Update
Some members of Charlotte’s front office liked the Boston deal, but Michael Jordan, the team’s owner and ultimate decision-maker, preferred Kaminsky to a pile of first-rounders outside the lottery, per several sources. That’s justifiable, if you think your guy at no. 9 has a chance at stardom. The talent gap between no. 9 and no. 15 is real; ask Boston how it felt to squeeze into the playoffs, get demolished by a Cavs team in chill mode, and watch Justise Winslow fall right where it could have picked had it won three fewer games.
via Grantland
Agents have at times sidestepped Cho to chat directly with Jordan, according to league sources. The team has turned over almost its entire scouting and analytics departments in the past year. (Though the Hornets recently hired Mike Born, a well-regarded Cho ally from Portland, to a key scouting position.) The relationship between Cho and Clifford has been cool since the team dismissed Rod Higgins, a Jordan ally with whom Clifford felt he could talk hoops, per sources familiar with the matter. Cho, Clifford, and Polk all downplayed the idea of a rift, and the two wings of the organization worked well together this summer to upgrade the team’s shooting across all positions — a goal they shared.
via Grantland
July 28, 2015 | 7:32 am EDT Update
Though Crowder always wanted to return, he admittedly needed some sign of president of basketball operations Danny Ainge’s good intentions. “When I first came here you guys were saying tanking, and that was real bad,” Crowder said of his initial reaction after arriving from the Dallas Mavericks as part of last December’s Rajon Rondo trade. “I didn’t want to be a part of that, selfishly because I don’t like losing. I had to ask our direction moving forward. (Ainge) responded well, as you can see. I’m pleased with the guys he brought in. I talked to Danny, the coaches and everyone. I wanted to know the direction. Moving forward we’re going to win playoff games, and that’s something we didn’t do last year. We’re taking steps. We want to get to Banner 18, but we have to win a playoff game first.
via Boston Herald
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Ronny Turiaf: A few weeks after my surgery, I reached out to Fred Hoiberg, who also underwent surgery for an enlarged aorta. His procedure happened three weeks before mine, and he walked me through every single issue I could ever encounter. He gave me moral support and told me everything was going to be okay. That meant a lot to me, because when you rehab from heart surgery, little scares come up all the time. There is so much to know and worry about, so every conversation with Fred was as priceless as the last. That’s why when I joined the Timberwolves in 2013, I chose Fred’s number. I’d always worn 21 whenever possible, but I wasn’t touching Kevin Garnett’s number, out of respect. So Clayton Wilson, the equipment manager, mentioned wearing 32 in honor of Fred, and we thought it was a great idea. What a wonderful rite of passage, and a way to honor someone who played for the Timberwolves and had such an impact in the Minnesota community.
via The Players' Tribune
Ronny Turiaf: When I think about the last ten years, I view it as a journey of self-discovery. The nomadic lifestyle I enjoy. Being open to new experiences. Exploring life to the limit. It’s been a fun ride. There’s a quote by Martin Lawrence: “Live this life until the wheels fall off.” That’s what I’m doing. I never wanted my heart surgery to define me, but then I learned to tap into the darkness that came with it to live my life fully. I embraced that basketball can allow me to touch lives. I’ve left a mark with my Heart To Heart Foundation. Fred Hoiberg was my mentor, and I’ve in turn reached out to other players like Jeff Green, Etan Thomas, Chuck Hayes and Channing Frye, who’ve faced similar challenges. I now enjoy that people see me as the guy who had open heart surgery. If I can use that to help other people, I’m all about it.
via The Players' Tribune
July 27, 2015 | 9:13 pm EDT Update
Arenas posted a photo to Instagram Sunday night showing himself and four children standing at the fairgrounds in front of a mountain of stuffed toys. “We just got banned from all the basketball hoops at (OC Fair),” Arenas wrote in the caption. OC Fair spokeswoman Robin Wachner said on Monday that Arenas was not banned from returning and playing in the future, but he had won the daily maximum of one prize per day from each of the fair’s 15 basketball games. No one at the fair recalled anyone previously achieving that same winning streak, she said.
via Orange County Register
July 27, 2015 | 7:51 pm EDT Update
Question has been, though, which dream will Connaughton pursue? “That’s the million-dollar question – literally,” said Connaughton, picked in the fourth round, 38th overall, of the 2014 amateur baseball draft by the Orioles and in the second round, 41st overall, by the Nets in the 2015 NBA draft before being traded to the Trail Blazers. The answer, for now, is basketball. Connaughton signed a three-year, rookie-scale contract with the Trail Blazers last week, with the first two years guaranteed at roughly $1.5 million, according to spotrac.com. He will put his baseball career on hold as he begins his NBA journey. “You kind of have to expect it if you want to succeed,” Connaughton said. “There’s a work ethic you need to keep.”
via Raleigh News & Observer
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