Gregg Popovich expects Tim Duncan to play one more season

“No matter how (the season) ends, I think Timmy is going to look at (retirement) again,” Popovich told USA TODAY Sports on Tuesday. “And if you ask me, my guess is that he’ll go for another one because he has been so consistent this season. It’s just consistent stuff: another double-double, over and over and over again. Because of that, I think in his mind that if it continues through the rest of the year, I think he’ll say, ‘I’m going to go another year and see what happens.’ Because what he has told me is that the minute he feels like he’s a hindrance to his team or he’s not on the positive end or helping him, he’s going to walk right off the court. It might be during the third quarter of a game. He’s not going to hang on to finish a contract or make the money or have the notoriety that you know he doesn’t give a (expletive) about. So the way he’s playing now, he’s going to look in the mirror and say, ‘Hey, I’m doing all right.’ ”

, , ,

More HoopsHype Rumors
November 26, 2015 | 5:18 pm EST Update
Hayes and Chaney led the Cougars to the program’s first Final Four in 1967 but lost to Lew Alcindor’s UCLA team in the semifinal game. “Basketball in the state of Texas and throughout the South is all due to coach Guy V. Lewis,” Hayes said in 2013. “He put everything on the line to step out and integrate his program. Not only that, he had vision to say: `Hey, we can play a game in the Houston Astrodome.’ Not only that, he just was such a motivator and such an innovator that created so many doors for the game of basketball to grow.”
November 26, 2015 | 3:36 pm EST Update
The smile is of happiness, appreciation and contentment. It’s a place that took the New Orleans Pelicans forward time to rediscover following the suicide of his girlfriend in August of 2013 and a serious, season-ending neck injury midway through the 2013-14 season. “In life, you’re going to go through something difficult. Maybe it’s not suicide but life is hard sometimes,” Anderson said. “I have a perspective that’s so valuable now, and it makes things matter more. It measures the strength that you have.”
“This summer was the first time I was really able to train and really focus on my diet and my health and getting stronger and getting more explosive,” Anderson said. “I felt about 45 years old the past couple of seasons with just a lot weighing on me. This season, I’ve lost weight and I’m focused on living more of a healthy lifestyle as far as eating and mixing that with great training.” It has translated into a rekindled zeal for basketball. “Basketball can be so frustrating but there’s something that drives you to keep coming back,” Anderson said. “For me, it is that love and passion for the game. I appreciate it so much. That’s how I feel. I’m grateful and appreciative for what I ha

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 148 other followers