HoopsHype Adam Silver rumors

LATEST HOOPSHYPE VIDEOS

December 11, 2014 Updates
December 9, 2014 Updates

TNT’s Reggie Miller joined the show to talk about the big storylines in the League. Miller weighed in on high-profile players protesting – he said there could be a precedent issue if players protest about an issue in a way that’s not in line with what a lot of people think. Reggie also weighed in on the Warriors owner’s statement on former coach Mark Jackson. And he weighed in on how long Kobe Bryant will play. The Dan Patrick Show

Sports Business Journal published a list Monday of the 50 most influential people in sports business, and Adam Silver topped No. 1. CBSSports.com

December 8, 2014 Updates
December 2, 2014 Updates

Several teams have informally pitched fixes. In an email exchange last week with Grantland, Mark Cuban conjured up a temporary plan that would shift Chicago, Detroit, Indiana, and Milwaukee to the West, with the three Texas teams and New Orleans moving to the East. Robert Sarver, the Suns owner, says he brought up the idea of abolishing conferences for at least the purposes of playoff seeding at the league’s board of governors meeting in October. The wound of having the 48-win Suns miss the playoffs last season is still fresh, but Sarver vows to keep poking at the issue regardless of his team’s fate going forward. “It needs to be looked at,” Sarver tells Grantland. “I’m getting closer to the point where I just think there needs to be a change. It is on the league’s radar screen now.” Grantland

Representatives from at least one other Western Conference team — the Thunder — have informally suggested a top-16 playoff structure over the last six months, according to several sources. Some pitches have included the wrinkle of re-seeding the playoffs after each round, league sources say. League higher-ups understand the outcry. “We are studying the issue closely,” says Adam Silver, the NBA’s commissioner. Grantland

December 1, 2014 Updates

Why is this a problem? It isn't so much the practice of tanking itself, but rather the poor public perception of the strategy that concerns Silver. "I don't necessarily disagree with the way it works now," Silver said. "I'd say from a personal standpoint, what I'm most concerned about is the perception out there right now. Frankly, the pressure is on a lot of our teams, even from their very fans, to somehow underperform because it's in some people's view the most efficient and quickest way to get better, so I think that's a corrosive perception out there. Whether it's the case, I'm frankly not sure. I think sometimes perception becomes reality in this league." CBSSports.com

November 28, 2014 Updates
November 25, 2014 Updates

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver is in Milwaukee to meet with Milwaukee Bucks investors and talk with young professionals involved in start-up companies. Silver is expected to get an update from Bucks' owners on locating a new multipurpose arena. The NBA has set a deadline of late 2017 for the Bucks to be in a new arena. Failing to meet that deadline means the league could buy the team and move it elsewhere. USA Today Sports

November 24, 2014 Updates

Your handling of the Sterling problem was almost universally supported. But I'm curious: How much discomfort did you have with the idea of stripping an owner of his franchise for having problematic social views? Were you worried about the precedent this decision would set? Adam Silver: Number one, it all happened so quickly. I heard the tape on Saturday morning, and Donald Sterling had been banned by Tuesday. And I was traveling at the time—I had a pre-planned trip to three NBA cities over that weekend. So in a way, I benefitted from not having time to dwell on the greater societal implications of that decision. But thinking about it now, I am less concerned—precedentially—with the fact that an owner can be removed for his beliefs. I am more concerned with it from a privacy standpoint. I am mindful that this began as a private conversation between Mr. Sterling and a girlfriend. In some ways, this case was made easy for us, because that private conversation—completely unrelated to any acts of the NBA—was made public and widely distributed. So from the NBA's perspective, I was dealing with a public statement. But that is something I've thought about quite a bit. This did not originate as a business conversation. It was not intended for public dissemination. And in fairness to everyone in the NBA, we have to consider the appropriate lines. We're all entitled to our private thoughts, and even an occasional misstep or misstatement should not be career-ending. GQ.com

You've said that nationalized gambling is now inevitable in this country, and that you have no moral problem with it, and that you want the NBA to be involved. All of that said, do certain aspects of this notion still worry you? Adam Silver: Absolutely. I have lots of fears, and a lot of them come from what's already happening now, which is widespread illegal sports betting on the NBA. That has existed forever, but now it's been mainstreamed. You can go to any search engine and put in "Bet NBA," and then spend your entire day looking at those sites with up-to-date point spreads and up-to-date information on who is officiating those games. If you enter your credit card, you can start making bets. Now, that might be illegal in the United States, outside of Nevada. But millions of people are doing it. So my view is that—if this is going to exist anyway—we're better off partnering in some way with the government, and the gaming companies, in order to regulate it. Both for the league and for the bettors. We need to insure that the information about injuries are properly reported and we need to make sure there is no inside betting from people who should not be allowed to make bets. GQ.com

If you could instantly change anything about the NBA, without having to negotiate the terms or compromise your position, what change would you make? Adam Silver: I would have a harder salary cap. I still think it's unhealthy for the league when a team like Brooklyn goes out and pays an exorbitant luxury tax in order to give themselves a better chance to win. From a league-office standpoint, the ideal league would be for all thirty teams to compete based on the skill of their management and players, as opposed to one team paying more to get better talent. So creating a more even system would be at the top of my list. And I'll give you one more: I think it would benefit the league to raise the minimum age from 19 to 20. GQ.com

Marijuana is legal in Colorado. A player from the Denver Nuggets can legally smoke weed but would be penalized by the NBA for doing so. What will you do if these drug laws continue to erode, state by state? Adam Silver: It doesn't force us to change our policy. Plenty of employers have rules against employees drinking, which is perfectly legal. This is a policy matter, and it's our strong preference that our players do not consume marijuana. We believe it will affect their performance on the court. That said, marijuana testing is something that's collectively bargained with the players' association, and we adjust to the times. But we're much more concerned about HGH testing and designer performance-enhancing drugs. Among our many priorities going forward, marijuana is not at the top of our list. GQ.com

November 23, 2014 Updates

In an op-ed piece in the New York Times earlier this month, Silver lobbied for the federal government to allow states to authorize betting on professional sports, subject to strict regulatory requirements and technological safeguards. "I agree 100 percent," Cuban said Saturday night before the Mavericks lost 95-92 to the Houston Rockets. "I think we're the world's biggest hypocrites when we say, 'Oh, we don't want you betting on our games,' and then we get all excited about the sports betting line and people go to Vegas on trips won from the NBA or NFL. I mean, it's hugely hypocritical. "I just think that Adam did the exact right thing. I think by focusing on the federal regulations and making the changes there, that it will change. It's just a question of when. ESPN.com

November 22, 2014 Updates

The state believes sports betting can help revive its struggling casino and horse racing industries. The sports leagues have argued that it will damage fans' perception of the integrity of their games, although NBA commissioner Adam Silver recently said expanded legalized sports betting in the United States is inevitable. New Jersey will file an appeal within days, State Senator Raymond Lesniak told ESPN. "We continue to believe that New Jersey has the right to allow sports betting in the state and we will keep up the fight in court," State Senate President Steve Sweeney said in a statement. "We are going to continuing pursuing every legal option available. The economic impact that sports wagering can have on New Jersey is far too important to simply shrug our shoulders and move on." ESPN.com

November 21, 2014 Updates

National Basketball Players Association executive director Michele Roberts ripped NBA commissioner Adam Silver’s punishment as “excessive and without precedent” in a statement on Thursday. The union was eager to challenge the NBA on the severity of the suspension based on the league’s Collective Bargaining Agreement. Yahoo! Sports

"We have a scheme of discipline that was the result of collective bargaining between the parties that has been applied consistently over the years. While we appreciate the sensitivity of this societal issue, the Commissioner is not entitled to rewrite the rules or otherwise ignore precedent in disciplinary matters. While ultimately this is Jeff's decision, we stand ready to file an immediate appeal on his behalf." Roberts' statement was in response to NBA Commissioner Adam Silver's announcement of Taylor's suspension Wednesday, after Taylor's plea Oct. 30. USA Today Sports

Any rumor missing? E-mail us at   hoopshype@hoopshype.com.