HoopsHype Andre Iguodala rumors

October 17, 2014 Updates
October 15, 2014 Updates

How did you feel coming off the bench Sunday?: “It doesn’t matter to me who I’m playing with. I think I’m going to make anybody better. When I’m out there playing basketball, it’s just ‘let me do me,’ and everybody is going to benefit. I feel confident that whoever I’m out there with is going to win.” San Francisco Chronicle

Do you care if you start?: “Do I care? I don’t know. That’s a good question. I’m just playing ball. You try not to make a big deal out of it. I’ve been in the league for a really long time, and there a lot of stories about anything and little things. If my shoes are tied the wrong way, that can become a story. I’m trying not to make it a story this year, and I’m trying to win a championship.” San Francisco Chronicle

Has head coach Steve Kerr talked to you about your role?: “Coach Kerr is actually kind of weird toward me, so I don’t know. He’s a little weird, man. He doesn’t talk to me, at all. No, we’ve spoken. We’re just talking basketball. He’s a smart guy, who knows the game. I think I’m a smart guy, who knows the game. We throw a lot of things around about past basketball when he played, present basketball and the future of the game. We throw all type of things around.” San Francisco Chronicle

The Warriors' Andre Iguodala has never once come off the bench in his 10-year NBA career, but coach Steve Kerr is open to the idea of having the forward do so this season. Kerr likes Iguodala in the point-forward role, especially while the team is missing Shaun Livingston and looking for a ball-handler for when Stephen Curry is not on the court. So the coach had Iguodala come off the bench in Sunday's blowout exhibition win over the Los Angeles Lakers. Oakland Tribune

Iguodala, who played wearing a mask over a broken nose, responded to being replaced by Harrison Barnes in the starting lineup by racking up eight assists without committing a turnover. "It's just growing up, being smart about the situation," Iguodala said Tuesday. "You could do the opposite and kind of just tank it just to say that it's wrong. But like I said, our whole focus with this team is to try to continue to improve and make the most out of our unit, and we have so much depth, there are opportunities for us to get where everybody wants to be." Oakland Tribune

October 13, 2014 Updates
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October 7, 2014 Updates

Andre Iguodala'S TV used to cackle into the early morning, the laugh track of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air echoing in the semidarkness of his master bedroom. For years, this was the All-Star swingman's post-midnight routine: watch reruns around 2 a.m.; pass out around 4; wake up around 8; drag self to gym; repeat. Iguodala traces the insomnia back to the University of Arizona, where he'd toss and turn over his pro future. But it was only last season, with his 30th birthday staring him in the face, that the newly hired Warrior surrendered his problem to an employer. "I told them that I needed to see a sleep therapist ASAP," Iguodala says. "And it's funny: Keke told me he'd been thinking about the same thing." Keke Lyles, Golden State's director of athletic performance, had already been researching what amounts to an open secret about NBA slumber: Players sleep as lightly as undergrads during finals week but nap harder than Spanish plutocrats. Iguodala's typical game-day siestas, for example, ran three to four hours. "Even if they've been out all night," says Grizzlies trainer Drew Graham, "most of them take naps and think that's enough. They see the other guys do it." ESPN.com

Such is the line, precarious as it is, that NBA teams are pledging to walk. And such is the line that players, whose union will have biometrics on its list of priorities during collective-bargaining-agreement talks in 2017, might ultimately refuse. But to hear the proponents of this revolution tell it, they're not so much sprinting toward Orwell as they are grinding their way to incremental improvements. "That's what the reality is," Lyles says. "We want to fine-tune things. If we do minor, little tweaks here and there, maybe a guy doesn't pull his hamstring." Or maybe, at the end of the fourth quarter, a foul defending a game-winning shot instead becomes a block. That much optimization, the upside of so much technocracy, is the carrot currently incentivizing the 30-year-old Iguodala as he staves off departure from the game he dearly loves. In the meantime? "I just hope we don't become robots," Iguodala says, "where they're feeding us the same thing, every day, and then it's time to flip the switch and go to sleep." ESPN.com

October 2, 2014 Updates
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September 29, 2014 Updates
September 6, 2014 Updates

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