HoopsHype Bob Myers rumors

May 6, 2014 Updates

“It’s never easy to make a decision of this nature,” said General Manager Bob Myers. “Mark has accomplished many good things during his three years with the organization, including his role in helping elevate this team into a better position than it was when he arrived nearly 36 months ago. We’re appreciative of his dedication and commitment since his arrival and are extremely grateful for his contributions. However, as an organization, we simply feel it’s best to move in a different direction at this time.” NBA.com

April 29, 2014 Updates
April 5, 2014 Updates

Diamond Leung: Darren Erman fired due to violation of company policy unrelated to basketball. Bob Myers said unrelated to Brian Scalabrine. Twitter @diamond83

April 2, 2014 Updates
March 11, 2014 Updates
February 20, 2014 Updates
January 29, 2014 Updates

Bob Myers: But Andrew understood that this is a place he wanted to be, and he obviously wanted to get a fair deal. I felt like we offered a fair deal, obviously he did too because he accepted it. But to find veteran extension opportunities, sometimes you need circumstances where a player is willing to possibly forgo an extra year of money for the security of getting a deal then instead of playing a year out. If they’re playing on teams that are willing to commit and not make the player play out that extra year, and willing to commit to him early, there are always variables that play into it. Some financial, some situational; injury plays into it to some extent, age plays into it, whether that player feels like he can get another deal, happiness, how happy is the player in that market, on that team with his coach and his front office. A lot of things have to line up and that’s why I think you see few of those types of deals. Basketball Insiders

Bob Myers: So it wasn’t just adding Iguodala, it was adding Iguodala along with clearing up a lot of salary on our books that really made us believe the deal was worth it from our side. If somebody wanted to compartmentalize the deal, you’d say one pick was for Iguodala and one pick was to get off $24 million. Would we do that in a bubble? Yeah, we felt like that was worth it, because it wasn’t just two first-round picks for Iguodala. We would have been looking at a team, should we not have done anything and stood pat, likely the same team coming back at the five starter spots, but also without Jarrett Jack and Carl Landry, who were huge in regards to our success last year. That likely would have set us back and we didn’t really want to take a step back after having some success for an organization that hadn’t had any in so long. We wanted to try to not just maintain, but take a small step forward. That was the motivation behind the deal and moving the picks. You never know how things could have worked out, you never know in any deal. Our thought at the time when we did it and constructed it was that it was worth it. Basketball Insiders

Bob Myers: We feel like we’ve still got players, more than two and three years where we think our core can play at a high level. We think continuity — although maybe some physical tools diminish with age — and your mind improves. Like look at a team like the Spurs and some of these teams that are a little older, even the HEAT to some degree, have some veterans that have been in the league a long time on their team and have experienced success. You look at some of the Celtics teams before they decided to go in a different direction. Basketball Insiders

January 27, 2014 Updates

Bob Myers: And I think specifically to Curry and Bogut, if we were going to bet, we were going to bet on high character people, and we felt like with both there were certainly risks. There were certainly risks with Curry, I think if you look back when that decision was made, 50 percent of people were against it. I’m sure 50 percent of people were against Bogut. But we have to make difficult decisions, everybody in any front office of any professional sports organization has to because you’re dealing in the commodity of human people, so it’s not perfect. It’s not a machine, it’s a person, so you really have to weigh all the elements that go into resigning or extending a player: Who they are, what their talent level is, history of injury, projected potential injury. So it’s difficult, it’s not easy. And sometimes you’re going to get it right, sometimes you’re going to get it wrong. But we felt like with the moves we’ve made, we feel like we’re betting on the right kind of people, and the right kind of talent. Basketball Insiders

Bob Myers: This organization has been small for so long and has had some success in that way, but from ownership on down, we feel like size is imperative to compete consistently in the NBA. So we had an opportunity to trade a guard for a center, and I think those opportunities are rare, and we took advantage of it. And Bogut happened to be hurt at the time. I’m not sure we could have got him if he was healthy. If he was healthy that would have been fine, maybe that would have allowed us to make a push towards the playoffs. But the fact that he was hurt allowed us to see what the team was with a lot of our young assets. Every day we come to work, we’re trying to find ways to improve our roster. Whether that’s through current assets or future assets or developing organically through the players we have here. Every day we want to leave work a little bit better than when we came in. Basketball Insiders

You talked about the timeline. When you came on in roughly early 2011 and then going into that summer and after the lockout, what did you perceive this team’s timeline for contention to be at that point? Bob Myers: Well what’s left from when I started is our two players, David Lee and Steph Curry. So of the 13 or 14 guys three years ago, we’ve kept two. So it’s a total overhaul of the entire roster, whether it’s through draft, trade or free agency. We have I would say, right now 13 new players in two years, which is a big turnover. Ideally you’d like to have more continuity, but we weren’t having success with the roster that year, obviously. We did believe last year, we hoped we put together a team that could make the playoffs. So our goal this year, last year it was to make the playoffs, this year was to make a good showing in the playoffs, and maybe next year it’s more than that. But we try to be realistic about where we are, we want to go beyond the goal of last year, which was just making the playoffs, and this year maybe advance in the playoffs. Maybe advance further than we did last year. Basketball Insiders

January 16, 2014 Updates
December 4, 2013 Updates

Oracle Arena erupted at the final buzzer after being a den of silence for much of the game. Team owner Joe Lacob and general manager Bob Myers ducked into a private room and let out a loud shout while the Warriors celebrated the NBA's biggest comeback this season while jogging off the court. Afterward, all anyone wanted to talk about was O'Neal's pep talk. "(He) gave a great speech at halftime," Thompson said. "Honestly, that was what was our turning point. It wasn't in the fourth quarter or the third quarter. It was at halftime." ESPN.com

September 30, 2013 Updates

Bob Myers has a fabulous job, with a salary that allows him to live anywhere he likes, visit any place he chooses. On this particular day, as soft clouds hover above the Bay Area, the Warriors general manager chooses state prison. He's not alone. Another member of the one-percent club, Warriors coach Mark Jackson, a former NBA star, also arrives at the joint. These two one-percenters are voluntarily rubbing shoulders -- literally -- with men serving time at this world-famous lockup on the north shore of San Francisco Bay. Myers and Jackson and Warriors assistant coach Brian Scalabrine, one year removed from playing in the NBA, are joined by other members of the Warriors organization, including assistant general manager Kirk Lacob, the son majority owner Joe Lacob. Contra Costa Times

August 29, 2013 Updates

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