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October 7, 2014 Updates

Owners claiming losses in the next negotiations "will not fly with us," he said. The CBA expires after the 2020-21 season but either players or owners can opt out of the deal after 2016-17. "The owners were telling us they were losing money. There's no way they can sit in front of us and tell us that right now," James said. USA Today Sports

The league right now projects a jump to $66.5 million for 2015-16, a modest rise pegged to the final year of that modest $930 million TV deal. If the new TV deal kicks in for the 2016-17 season just shy of $2 billion, the cap could exceed that same $14 million leap, all the way to around $80-plus million, in a single year. If for some reason the new TV deal starts north of $2 billion in the first year — meaning it would include smaller year-over-year jumps — the cap for 2016-17 could leap even higher. If it started at that exact $2.68 billion figure, it would break $90 million, according to my own math and some bleary-eyed late-Sunday projections from cap gurus around the league. The plans as of now are to start at $2.1 billion in 2016-17, the first year of the deal, and escalate in even year-over-year increments to a peak of $3.1 billion in the final year, per sources who have reviewed a memo the league sent to teams today. Grantland

Other smoothing mechanisms would need to involve the union, and the league is open to that. Some team executives have floated the idea of retroactively bumping up existing contracts that carry into the new TV deal, to make sure those players get their share. That would draw opposition from teams who signed those contracts specifically with an eye on how their value would evolve. Grantland

October 6, 2014 Updates
July 20, 2014 Updates

“We have a system in place in which the players receive roughly 50 percent of the revenue, and we’ve been very transparent with you, the media, obviously our owners know what’s going on, but we’ve also included the Players Association directly in updates on those discussions.” It’s interesting that Silver would acknowledge the expected increase, an indication that the league is soaring in popularity. The desire of Fox Sports to pursue a Saturday national game of the week only confirms that. Boston Globe

While there has been criticism of the Celtics signing Avery Bradley to a four-year, $32 million deal, it is expected to devalue and become more of a bargain for the team once the new television agreement is reached. “The current deals expire in two years, so whether or not they were party to these discussions, the marketplace seems to be suggesting that we’re going to get a substantial increase in our next television deals, and of course the way the cap is set,” Silver said. “In essence it’s based off 30 teams — you take 50 percent of our total revenue and divide it by 30, and that’s roughly how our cap is completed. So the basic math is such that if we get a large increase in our television deals, the players are going to get half and the cap will go up.” Boston Globe

July 11, 2014 Updates

This year, however, the league sent out a second memo. Entitled "Consideration in Trades and Trade Structure", it is a reminder and/or clarifier to teams about some of the specifics of what they can and cannot do in trades. Seemingly, they felt this was necessary Considering the presence of this memo suggests that some teams do not entirely understand the rules (or, perhaps, have been intent on pushing them back a bit), it is self-evidently the case that those of us outside of the league will not fully know them either. So, here goes. Sham Sports

Essentially, the trade is both one big deal and three parallel smaller ones at the same time. The need to trade something for something is satisfied in the overall deal and thus does not need to be satisfied in each parallel smaller one. The relevant passage in the memo suggests that it is this practice that may be under threat. However, in the trade that the quoted passage above was in reference to (the MarShon Brooks/Steve Blake trade from the last deadline day), provisions were not circumvented. Provisions were not defeated. Things were worked around, yes, specifically Golden State's inability to aggregate Brooks's salary in trade. But the Warriors and Lakers (mainly the Warriors) did all their finagling within the rules set forth by the Collective Bargaining Agreement. They did not do anything here other than what they were permitted to do, and even if they had done, the league still approved the trade. Sham Sports

If the NBA feels that manoeuvring in the manner of the Warriors and Lakers above is contrary to the spirit of the Traded Player Exception and specifically to the use of non-simultaneous trades, then, fine. It pretty much is - on all but the most technical of levels, Brooks and Bazemore were traded for Blake in one deal, with only minutiae stating others. But it was also perfectly allowed by the very clauses the league signed up to in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. And if this is not the kind of matter that this passage of the memo refers to, then we will have to see what it is, because I have no other guesses. Nevertheless, whatever it is, this could be an interesting thing to watch develop. The NBA may be seeking to outlaw a practice it simultaneously permits. We shall see over time where the new boundaries lie. Sham Sports

July 2, 2014 Updates

An 18-month payment schedule would allow a player to continue receiving paychecks through the 2017-18 season, even if games aren’t played because of a work stoppage, according to an e-mail sent to players and agents by acting union Executive Director Ron Klempner, a copy of which was obtained by Bloomberg News. “As we have learned in the past, the owners have made provisions with the TV networks to continue to receive rights fees throughout a work stoppage, and there is no reason the players should not make every effort to take the same precaution,” the e-mail said. The e-mail suggests players use the 18-month provision in any multiyear contract, though it highlights the 2016-17 season. Bloomberg

June 24, 2014 Updates

There is some debate about whether players should wait until the NBA’s new TV deal kicks in to sign their mega-contracts, since the individual player max is tied to the cap — which goes up hand-in-hand with league revenue. But turning down guaranteed long-term money is a gamble, and no one is quite sure when exactly the cap will make a huge leap. Grantland

May 30, 2014 Updates
May 20, 2014 Updates
April 22, 2014 Updates

Coon notes that under the current CBA, players are guaranteed 50 percent of the league’s forecasted BRI and 60.5 percent of the difference between forecasted revenue and actual revenue, meaning players are set to receive a total of $2.384 billion next season. Given the favorable terms awarded to owners in the 2011 CBA and the improved financial health of the league and its teams, Coon predicts NBA players will activate their opt-out clause in 2017 from the CBA and re-negotiate to get a larger piece of the league’s revenue. A lock-out would result: I expect the players to opt-out in 2017, and for the league to impose a lockout on July 1, 2017 (because they can’t do business without an agreement in place), However, negotiations will be quick and smooth (similar to 2005), and there will be a new CBA in place in time for the 2017-18 season to begin on time. The Fields of Green

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