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CHARLOTTE HORNETS VIDEOS

March 9, 2015 Updates
March 8, 2015 Updates

Taylor, 25, will likely always be associated with the night of Sept. 25, but he said he does not want that to define him. The NBA mandated that Taylor, who police reported was inebriated at the time of the incident, enter an outpatient alcohol program. The league was stern with its punishment and Taylor accepted his fate. “I just want to go on with what I love to do, and that’s play basketball,” he said. “I’m blessed to be able to wake up every day and play basketball, so that’s all I want to focus on, that and being happy. I’m alive.” Boston Globe

Taylor said he is trying to become a better person. “You grow stronger as a person and adversity builds character,” he said. “You learn that with faith and having the right people around you and your own personal strength, there’s not a lot you can’t overcome. It’s definitely a high-pressure job [playing in the NBA], you’re expected to perform every night. You have all the other stuff that doesn’t concern basketball that you have to deal with as well, it’s a lot. But we’re definitely all blessed to play basketball for a living and do what we love for a living. I don’t think anybody sees it as something that is hard to deal with. It comes with the territory.” Boston Globe

March 6, 2015 Updates
March 5, 2015 Updates
March 4, 2015 Updates
March 3, 2015 Updates
March 2, 2015 Updates

Michael Jordan is a rookie on the Forbes billionaire list, coming in at a tie for the 1,741st richest person in the world. Though the Nike Air Jordan brand continues to do bonkers sales ($2.25 billion in 2013, from which Jordan earned $90 million), the biggest reason for his leap onto the list is his ownership in the Hornets — his stake in the franchise now supposedly worth over $500 million after Steve Ballmer dropped $2 billion on the Clippers. Now that MJ has cleared this imaginary hurdle, total happiness and fulfillment are surely close behind. The Big Lead

March 1, 2015 Updates

The players mostly are forgotten now, but in the summer of 1991, the Knicks brought a group of hopefuls to the Catskills to play against an equally non-descript team of Philadelphia 76ers wannabes. One guy stood out: this hulking 6-foot-7 bruiser, Anthony Mason, who tossed the Sixers around like rag dolls. “Mase was tough. He didn’t give up anything. He wanted to play. Even then, players weren’t nearly as tough as he was,” said Paul Silas, a three-time champ as a player who was a Knicks assistant and later Mason’s head coach in Charlotte. New York Post

Mason did it his way. He frequently sent ballboys or locker-room attendants for a couple pregame hot dogs, a habit which didn’t endear him to Knicks nutritionists. One game, the ballboy was intercepted. The hot dogs were removed from the buns and replaced with bananas. Mason was not amused. But his anger would fade far quicker than the bruises he inflicted on opponents. And he wasn’t just a brute. Silas turned him into a point forward in Charlotte, a far more demanding role, and Mason handled it perfectly. New York Post

February 28, 2015 Updates
 

THE TOP 50 PLAYERS IN BOBCATS HISTORY

There's no sugarcoating it: It's a bad list where star power is pretty much non-existent. Gerald Wallace, the only All-Star in franchise history, goes to No. 1.

   

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