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CHARLOTTE HORNETS VIDEOS

February 10, 2015 Updates

Dwayne “Tiny” Morton has been spotted on the sidelines of a handful of games this season to watch his former team — the Lincoln Railsplitters, and was spotted again during Friday night’s win against Jefferson. The first-year assistant coach at Seton Hall said that he's heard the trade rumors connecting his former player, Lance Stephenson, to the Brooklyn Nets. He seemed excited by the idea and brushed off concerns that Stephenson could get himself into trouble playing back at home. “He's been in the NBA for a couple of years now and if he can't manage playing at home then he doesn't belong in the NBA,” Morton said. “So I don't think Lance will have a problem playing at home. I think that he would love to play in Brooklyn.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle

“I just hope that if it happens that his team is good enough that it can win,” he said. “He doesn't want to come home and lose. That's a bad situation right there...I'm not in the NBA so I don't know, but if he loses it's too much, it doesn't matter who you are, it’s going to be a tough situation for anyone.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle

Officially reintroducing the Marbury Mid is Charlotte Hornets guard Lance Stephenson, who's been playing in the original White/Navy colorway. Last October, Stephenson told us that the Marbury was one of the AND1 shoes he wanted to see retroed. “I want the Sprewells to come back out. I want the Stephon Marburys to come back out,” said Stephenson. “I try to tell them give me all of them in different colorways.” Sole Collector

February 9, 2015 Updates

Axelrod stuffs his hands in the pockets of his blazer and walks the short block back to the Institute of Politics. Inside, the floors are covered in the salt stains of a hundred student boots. The institute, which hosts an impressive slate of speakers from both parties, including, in April, Mitt Romney, is something of an ad hoc museum, filled with Axelrod’s collection of American political artifacts. In the front hall is a glass-encased ballot box from the Florida 2000 presidential election. There’s also a napkin signed by JFK, a letter from the newly elected Abraham Lincoln to the Chicago mayor’s son, and a signed poster of Michael Jordan. “When the president turned 50, I wanted to get him something special … so I sent it to Jordan to have him sign it for me.” In black Sharpie, Jordan scrawled, “To Barrack: you still owe me dinner. Wishing you well, Michael Jordan.” “I gave it to the president, and he said, ‘I can’t put this up, he misspelled my name!’ So I said, ‘Fine, I’ll take it.’ ” His own office is a special exhibit dedicated to his time in politics — a program from a State of the Union speech, a ticket to the Nobel Prize ceremony, an invite to Obama’s swearing-in as senator, with the words HERE BECAUSE OF YOU! written in the president’s script. New York Magazine

February 8, 2015 Updates
February 6, 2015 Updates
February 5, 2015 Updates

Kidd-Gilchrist is rummaging through his backpack on the 14th floor of the JW Marriott in downtown Los Angeles, searching for a DVD of The Lion King, which he carries almost everywhere he goes. His earliest memories are of watching the movie with his father, Michael Gilchrist Sr. He was Simba. His dad was Mufasa. They bought the stuffed animals. They recited the lines. In August 1996, a month before the boy’s third birthday, Michael Sr. was shot and killed in a still-unsolved murder on the east side of Camden, N.J. Michael says he remembers the last time they were together. “We were in bed,” he says, “watching The Lion King.” At the funeral, he slid the Simba doll into the casket. Sports Illustrated

Cindy was not Catholic, but she entered Michael in grief counseling with a Camden nun named Helen Cole. “I’d see her every week,” Kidd-Gilchrist recalls, “and I could talk to her about anything. She became like my second mom.” Sister Cole taught him that help was always available, as long as a person was humble enough and courageous enough to accept it. In first grade Michael was diagnosed with cognitive learning disabilities, and in second he started seeing a speech therapist for the stutter he had developed as a toddler. “God has blessed Michael with a gift,” a school administrator told Cindy. “Help him discover what that gift is.” Sports Illustrated

Several teams hired Price as a shooting consultant or player development coach, but in 2013 the Hornets made him a full-time assistant. His first project was Kidd-Gilchrist. “Good luck,” another coach told him. “You can’t fix that.” Price accepted the job on one condition: “Nobody tells Michael Kidd-Gilchrist anything about his shot but me.” Price suggested subtle alterations throughout last season, but the stroke required massive reconstruction, and that demanded months of dedicated training. Sports Illustrated

When Jefferson returned to Charlotte last August, he watched Kidd-Gilchrist take aim. “Damn,” Jefferson gushed, “that looks good.” Kidd-Gilchrist could not remember the last time someone said something genuinely nice about his J. “Really?” he asked. “I mean, for real? It looks good?” Price won’t go quite that far. “It looks… normal,” he says, the implication being that normal in this case is remarkable. When Kidd-Gilchrist’s form was first broadcast in training camp, via the Hornets’ Instagram account, he called his mom. “Did you see it?” he hollered. “You’ve got to see it.” Sports Illustrated

 

THE TOP 50 PLAYERS IN BOBCATS HISTORY

There's no sugarcoating it: It's a bad list where star power is pretty much non-existent. Gerald Wallace, the only All-Star in franchise history, goes to No. 1.

   

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