HoopsHype Chris Webber rumors

May 3, 2011 Updates

Now retired Kings legend Chris Webber had been vocal about keeping the team in Sacramento, and he kept it up today on twitter. "SACRAMENTO! It's true!," he tweeted, "One more year! But Trust me! We are working to make it a LIFETIME! Keep the faith!" And C-Webb ended his tweet with a little dig at the City of Anaheim. "Lot of Haters are sick right now!" he wrote. Former King Carl Landry, who was traded for Thornton in February, also tweeted his support for the Kings remaining in Sacramento saying "Sacramento is a basketball city...u guys deserve it!!!" Beyond the twitter-sphere, News10 tracked down Kings forward Donte Greene via Skype shortly after Monday's announcement. "(Sacramento) means a lot, it gave me my start in the NBA and the start of a new beginning in my life", Greene told News10's Ryan Yamamoto. "My son's first (NBA) game was in sac and it means a lot to my family and friends." news10.net

April 28, 2011 Updates

Hill also revealed he was supposed to participate in Rose’s controversial Fab Five documentary. “I was excited to see the story and see this documentary,” Hill said. “With the exception of one part, I thought it was well done.” Rose described Duke’s African-American players as “Uncle Toms.” Hill was most bothered by the post-documentary discussion Rose participated in on ESPN and the impact the controversy had on Hill’s two daughters. “When I was nine years old, you could get somewhat shielded from that, but now with the way kids receive information ... my 9-year-old knew about it,” Hill said. “I’m on the road and she’s calling me, ‘Why is someone calling you an Uncle Tom? What does that mean?’ That certainly played into me wanting to respond to that ... I get and understand sort of what he was trying to say. It wasn’t even so much the doc as it was the response the next day on ‘First and 10’ and the various platforms ESPN has to promote. And (Rose) was asked, ‘Do you still feel that way?’ And to not answer that, to me, said a lot. But like I said, we’ve talked. I don’t think he feels that way.” FOXSports.com

April 18, 2011 Updates

Sources indicate former Kings all-star forward Chris Webber was seen in Las Vegas talking with members of the Maloof family Saturday afternoon. Webber did not return a phone call this weekend. Amidst the madness and uncertainty of the Maloofs attempted Kings’ relocation to Anaheim, a meeting between Webber and family members could mean nothing, something or everything. Webber, now a TNT NBA commentator, last week surprised many with statements regarding his desire and attempts to assist the efforts to keep the Kings in Sacramento. Marty McNeal

Sources within the past month told Marty Mac’s World Webber had been working with a group that wanted to buy the Kings from the Maloofs. However, the Maloofs steadfastly have insisted the franchise is not for sale. Webber’s group was unable to get a meeting with the Maloofs. Marty McNeal

April 14, 2011 Updates

The save-the-Kings campaign got a tantalizing assist late Tuesday, when former Kings star Chris Webber said on TNT's "Inside the NBA" that he was working with a group trying to keep the team in Sacramento. He declined to elaborate, but former Kings executive Greg Van Dusen said Webber wants to participate in a plan to restructure the city of Sacramento's loan to the Kings in order to ease the team's financial stress. Van Dusen was behind a proposal last month to refurbish Power Balance Pavilion, which was rejected by the Maloofs. Van Dusen said Wednesday he doesn't know if a restructuring would make any difference in the Maloofs' deliberations. "It's too early to tell," he said. Sacramento Bee

April 13, 2011 Updates

Webber saying he is engaged in talks with individuals intent on keeping the Kings in Sacramento; Barkley (jokingly?) saying he will invest "$10-15 million" to assist; Smth, also a former King, saying that, on the Kings worst nights, the fans were as lusty as they were during the years they contended. Sacramento Bee

April 1, 2011 Updates

In a Friday morning radio interview with 103.3 FM in Dallas, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban shot back at Webber, defending his team's toughness and questioning Webber's originality. "Chris Webber has never had an original thought. It doesn't really matter. You know how these guys work. The last time I looked it was Jason Terry pushing and our guys responding -- no one is backing down from anybody. And it's the same nonsense talked by the same people who haven't had an original thought in their entire lives. Look, we don't care what Chris Webber says. It doesn't matter what Chris Webber says. We just go out and do our thing." CBSSports.com

March 23, 2011 Updates

Earl Barron: Just watched the Fab Five documentary start to finish finally. Bill Walton said they were under achievers and over rated. WTF. They made it to the Final Four as freshmen. How is that over rated? Everybody just hated on their style back then. Twitter

March 22, 2011 Updates

ESPN for the last two years rolled out a series of documentaries but none of them has gotten the reaction and buzz of your “Fab Five” documentary that aired on March 13. Time Magazine described the reaction as a “media firestorm.” Did you anticipate the reaction that you got from the film? JALEN ROSE: I absolutely did. That’s why the entire time it was noted that the revolution will be televised. That’s why it was very important for the story to be told 20 years later, as opposed to five years, 10 years, or even 15 years because a lot of issues that were noted in the documentary, a lot of the conversation we discussed in the documentary, and a lot of the situations that we exposed — good, bad or indifferent — I knew a lot of people weren’t going to be ready for, and/or were uncomfortable hearing them, especially knowing that a lot of it was true. ChrisWebber.com

Grant Hill was so taken aback by that criticism that he wrote an op-ed piece for The New York Times. What was your reaction to what Grant Hill wrote? JALEN ROSE: It was very eloquently put, the soliloquy he did for The New York Times. And I understand where he’s coming from. I’m pretty sure, whether it’s family members, friends, or the media, a lot of people have instigated this to a point where it’s become irresponsible journalism. I’ve heard people question whether Jalen Rose is a racist, I’ve heard people question whether I still feel that way now. The documentary clearly noted about how we felt about an opponent. [Grant Hill] was someone I was competing against. And what set the tenor of the documentary, (ESPN Analyst) Dick Vitale summed it up best when he said: “Michigan, they don’t represent the clean cut, All American kind of guy.” Well, that’s what Grant Hill represented. ChrisWebber.com

JALEN ROSE: In describing that term, that’s the word I used: Uncle Tom. Do I feel that way in 2011: of course not. He’s a very accomplished player, he comes from a tremendous family, Duke is an established program, Coach K is a tremendous coach, and the upbringing that Grant Hill had: that’s what I’m trying to bring to my kids. So I understand that it’s a school for everyone now. But then, I was fighting against Vitale’s comments; we were fighting against the letters you saw in the documentary that were so hate filled. And that was my way to express it. ChrisWebber.com

Have you had a chance to speak to Grant Hill since the documentary aired? JALEN ROSE: I’m pretty sure, when we see each other in a week, a month, a couple of months — we will see each other soon, talk to each other soon, give each other a pound, hug it out, and move on. Really, the disappointing thing to me is when people try to make it a racial theme. The last time I checked, we’re both Black. It was a socio-economic issue that, at 17, I didn’t understand. Now, I do understand. So I don’t anticipate all of a sudden me and him setting up a heavyweight bout so we can slug it out. At the same time, I think it can now be a learning experience. Because whether people like the delivery or not, what remains is socio-economic issues based on class, based on status, based on stature, and those still exist. It’s unfortunate that a couple of idiotic media members were so simple-minded to take the term Uncle Tom to use that to define the doc, but not responsible enough to pay attention to how I said it. Again what I said about Duke, what I said about Grant Hill – that is how I felt. And I stressed it – I hated Duke. Not “I hate Duke.” Two separate things. ChrisWebber.com

A lot of people who watched the documentary were left wondering where was Chris Webber? JALEN ROSE: Chris has a great opportunity to participate. I felt personally, as well as Juwan, Ray, and Jimmy that the forum could not have gotten any bigger. It’s not like it was me and my boy holding a camera, trying to do a documentary. He was initially 100 percent committed to do it. That’s what allowed me to pitch it to ESPN. As he realized the project was moving forward, he got cold feet and he felt like he did not want to address the issues — good, bad, and ugly — that happened from 1991 to 1993. But since the story is about the Fab Five, the story is not just about him. For him to not give an interview in 2011, that really does not affect the integrity of the story. ChrisWebber.com

March 16, 2011 Updates

Suns forward Grant Hill has written an editorial that will appear in this Sunday's New York Times in response to the ESPN 30 for 30 documentary on Michigan's Fab Five. The Fab Five was a college contemporary of Hill's time at Duke and the documentary, for which Jalen Rose was executive producer, has created controversy with statements Rose made about Duke recruiting, including an "Uncle Tom" reference. He and Michigan teammate Jimmy King made specific statements about Hill. Arizona Republic

March 14, 2011 Updates

Besides the on-court rivalry, Rose said in the film he felt Duke didn't recruit black players like him, only those who were “Uncle Toms.” Patrick pointed out that Duke did recruit Chris Webber. “We would've welcomed him with open arms,” Hurley said. “Jalen, on the other hand, I can understand why we didn't recruit him. He might have a tough time hitting the floor, because he wasn't taking my spot.” Detroit Free Press

Former Michigan star Jalen Rose described Sunday's ESPN documentary “The Fab Five” this way during a national conference call: “This is almost like the Bible of the Fab Five story. We really went in-depth about everything — the good, the bad, the ugly.” Michigan center Eric Riley's memories of his days playing with the Fab Five fall under the "bad" and "ugly" categories more often than the "good." "We felt like it was split. It felt like it was two different teams," Riley said, referring to the Fab Five and the Wolverines players that were there before their arrival. "We had experience, and some of us had been on a team that won a national championship (1989). But we felt like we were just part of their team." Daily Tribune

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