HoopsHype Chris Wright rumors

June 24, 2013 Updates

The Jamboree will feature a show by local rapper Shy Glizzy, a conditioning workout for high school athletes, a St. John’s basketball game, and a pro game including Kevin Durant, Mike Beasley, J.R. Smith, Nolan Smith, and Nick Young, among others; players Wright hopes to call colleagues one day. “I want to play in the NBA,” he said, “Have a long tenure, and hopefully prolong that into whatever’s the next stage of my life.” CSNWashington.com

June 11, 2013 Updates

Bill Oram: 24 guys attending Jazz mini-camp. Brace yourselves: Dee Bost, Will Buford, Xavier Gibson, Drew Gordon, JaMychal Green, Rodney Green, Jorge Gutierrez, Marquez Haynes, Lazar Hayward, Cedric Jackson, Edwin Jackson, Rick Jackson, D.J. Kennedy, Travis Leslie, Rasid Mahalbasic, Toure Murry, Harouna Mutombo, Arinze Onuaku, Josh Owens, Chris Roberts, Henry Sims, Jermaine Taylor, Chris Wright and Luke Zeller. Twitter @tribjazz

March 23, 2013 Updates
March 18, 2013 Updates

Chris Wright, from all outward appearances, looks every bit the professional basketball player, looking for his big break in the NBA like dozens of others. "I feel good, man," Wright said on the floor of AT&T Center in San Antonio Thursday. "I feel like a healthy, 23-year-old young man." For the most part, he is. He has parlayed an excellent season with the NBA Development League's Iowa Energy into a 10-day contract with the Mavericks. But Wright is also the only known current NBA player who has multiple sclerosis. After being diagnosed a year ago, while playing abroad for Olin Edirne, a Turkish team about 125 miles from Istanbul, Wright came home and spent four months recovering and finding the right combination of medicine and treatment. He has been symptom-free since the initial attack, which often happens with so-called "relapsing/remitting" MS sufferers, and with continuing treatment, Wright may experience a partial or complete recovery where the disease does not progress any further. Only time, and how he feels, will tell. NBA.com

For now, Wright's MS does not affect his play. He only has to undergo one two-hour IV drip of his primary drug, Tysabri, every month. There has been no recurrence of the symptoms he suffered in Turkey. He has also been busy with the arrival of his first child with his girlfriend, a son, Chris, Jr. (It's not likely their child will develop MS; there's a 3 percent incidence of children of MS patients developing the disease, according to Crayton.) "If you put it in perspective, it is what it is," Wright said. "I feel like me playing here, it's much bigger than me. It opens up a whole lot of doors for people who have MS. And it gives people inspiration to keep up hope. It's an honor, man. It's an inspiration." NBA.com

For the most part, he is. He has parlayed an excellent season with the NBA Development League's Iowa Energy into a 10-day contract with the Mavericks. But Wright is also the only known current NBA player who has multiple sclerosis. After being diagnosed a year ago, while playing abroad for Olin Edirne, a Turkish team about 125 miles from Istanbul, Wright came home and spent four months recovering and finding the right combination of medicine and treatment. He has been symptom-free since the initial attack, which often happens with so-called "relapsing/remitting" MS sufferers, and with continuing treatment, Wright may experience a partial or complete recovery where the disease does not progress any further. Only time, and how he feels, will tell. Then again, maybe he won't tell. "Even if it was something, I wouldn't let anybody know," Wright said. "It's part of the process. Everybody has pain. It's like an injury." NBA.com

But Wright did not get drafted in 2011, and couldn't hook on with an NBA team as a free agent. He signed with Olin Edirne in August of 2011, and for the first few months, everything was fine. He was the Eurobasket.com Player of the Week in early December, 2011, after posting a double-double. But a couple of months later, everything changed. "I was at practice, and I was running sprints," Wright said. "I was trying to touch the baseline. And I slipped. And I thought it was just, I must've tripped or did something. And as I was walking I felt that I was losing sensation [in his leg], and I had a little pain in my foot. So I went home that night, and my foot started ... it was like your foot going to sleep. And it just constantly felt like that. And I was getting pain from it. So I was like, whatever, and I just played it off. The next day, I got up, and I went in early to shoot, and I lost sensation, basically, on the whole right side of my body. I couldn't feel anything." NBA.com

"It was a tough situation," Wright said. "But they knew they had to release me. Because I physically wasn't able to do anything. I literally could not walk. The next morning I had to crawl to get out the bed. I couldn't walk for about four days." He flew back to Washington, where the staff at Georgetown put him in touch with new doctors. Some of them told him he would never be able to play again and should think about getting into coaching. But Wright's search ultimately led him to Crayton, the medical director of the MS Center of Greater Washington, D.C. and an assistant professor of neurology at Georgetown University Hospital. "She said, 'You can do what you want to do,' " Wright said. "'You've got to monitor yourself.' And I'm doing it. It's been a blessing. I feel good. I haven't had a relapse since." NBA.com

The aggressive treatment has worked so far. After taking four months off to find the right combination of medicine and treatment, Wright wanted to give the NBA another try. But he found word of his disease had gotten ahead of him. Even though Crayton personally told teams Wright was fine, they didn't want to take the risk. "It came up several times," Wright said. "I actually tried to get into summer league. Teams backed out at the last minute, because of the MS. So it definitely came up. Several teams backed off when it came to training camp: We don't want to have that risk factor. Which I understand. It's understandable." NBA.com

March 13, 2013 Updates

The Dallas Mavericks have signed free agent guard Chris Wright to a 10-day contract. Wright was playing in the NBA Development League for Iowa, where the 6-foot-1 guard averaged 15.5 points and 7.0 assists in his 38 games. He was a D-League All-Star. The Mavericks announced the deal Wednesday. They have a full 15-player roster. Wright is expected to join the Mavericks in San Antonio and be available for Thursday night's game against the Spurs. USA Today Sports

Dwain Price: PG Chris Wright will sign his 10-day contract with the #Mavs on Wed., and then practice with the team's low-minute players in San Antonio. Twitter @DwainPrice

March 11, 2013 Updates

After a four-year career running point for John Thompson III at Georgetown, the 6-foot-1-inch, 210-pound Wright wasn't selected in the 2011 NBA draft, leading him to pursue a pro career overseas in Turkey. Several months after joining Turkish club Olin Edirne, Wright fell while leaning down to touch the baseline during a sprint at practice ... and, as Anthony Olivo wrote in a January feature on Wright, things got pretty odd after that. “It was kind of weird,” Wright said, thinking back on the moment.” I didn’t know, I was thinking maybe I stumbled over my foot or something like that, but that night it got progressively worse and the next morning I came in to shoot early before practice and I lost all sensation in basically my right leg and my right hand.” [...] He immediately sought medical attention. The initial diagnosis, while not definitive at the time, was that he had Multiple Sclerosis — M.S. — [a] disease that attacks the Central Nervous System and, at worst, can cause complete or partial paralysis. [...] “Honestly, I didn’t know what M.S. was,” Wright said with a laugh. “Then I remember a couple of my teammates came into the hospital and I was laying on the bed and they were all looking at me like, ‘oh my God’ like it’s something serious, and I was just like, ‘man, why you all looking at me like that? I don’t even know what’s going on.’” Yahoo! Sports

March 10, 2013 Updates

The Mavericks will probably sign a young player out of the D-League, rather than bring in a re-tread such as Mike Bibby, Earl Boykins, Michael Redd or Baron Davis. Among the possibilities is point guard Chris Wright, who has averaged 15.5 points and seven assists for Iowa of the D-League. Also, Texas Legends point guards Justin Dentmon and Sean Singletary are on the Mavericks’ radar. Dallas Morning News

March 9, 2013 Updates

General manager Bob Myers said he had cordial talks with Jackson daily about who might fit and reiterated that it didn’t make any sense to bring in a player to sit on the bench. There was some talk about guards Maalik Wayns and Chris Douglas-Roberts, forwards Josh Childress, Dominic McGuire and Chris Wright and center Mickell Gladness. But the Warriors agreed that Thomas was the right guy, because he’s a defense-first wing who is athletic enough to finish in transition – some of the very attributes the Warriors lost when Brandon Rush tore his anterior cruciate ligment in the season’s second game. San Francisco Chronicle

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