HoopsHype Chris Wright rumors

September 19, 2013 Updates

The Toronto Raptors announced Thursday they have signed forward Chris Wright and guards Carlos Morais and Julyan Stone. Per team policy, financial details were not disclosed. Wright participated on the Raptors’ entry at the 2013 NBA Las Vegas Summer League and 2012 training camp in Halifax. During five games at Summer League he averaged 10.0 points and 3.2 rebounds while shooting .588 (20-for-34) from the field. Wright spent the 2012-13 season with the Maine Red Claws of the NBA D-League and earned third-team All-NBA Development League honours. He appeared in 39 games with the Red Claws and ranked 10th in League scoring with 18.3 points per game. Raptors.com

September 16, 2013 Updates

The Raptors president/general manager confirmed Sunday that Angolan guard Carlos Morais has been invited to training camp, along with Julyan Stone and Chris Wright. Morais, a 27-year-old, 6-foot-3 guard has been playing professionally since he was a teenager and has been a major reason why Angola has emerged as the class of the continent since 2005. Toronto Sun

September 15, 2013 Updates
September 14, 2013 Updates

Hoping the Raptors will have leave their fifteenth roster spot open until the end of training camp, if they fill it at all. Can they go the whole season with only 14 on the roster or do they have to have 15 by some specific date in the year. Again, I suspect you have answered this before, but my memory isn't what it used to be. Will you be in Halifax when the Raps play their game here this time?? Gerry T. Doug Smith: Not sure if you saw the little tweet thing late Friday from Regina but there will probably be 17 players in camp, 14 with contracts, Julyan Stone, who had some injury problems when they thought about signing him in the summer, Chris Wright and one other still to be determined. But I didn't get any indication from anyone on whether or not that means they will go to 15, that is not a certainty. Toronto Star

September 13, 2013 Updates
July 5, 2013 Updates

He moved his jaw around like he had a mouthful of cold sauerkraut. It wasn’t anger or bitterness. It was sheer defiance, which you expect from a kid with the aura of strength that this one has, as he seems to equate yielding with defeat. “They had their beliefs, and I had mine. So I went to find another specialist,” said Chris Wright, whose search took him to Dr. Heidi Crayton, a Virginia neurologist. “She told me to go for it. I asked her if there was another NBA player who had MS, and she said no. “So I said, ‘Well, then, that’s my goal.’” Newark Star-Ledger

That’s not quite accurate, his client admits: “I still get some tingling sensations in my feet and hands, if I get stressed out or if I’m in the gym for five hours,” Wright said. “But I have nothing to complain about. I’m comfortable with where I am, I’ve come to accept MS as a challenge to be met, and I see the need to show people you can still accomplish anything with it.” That’s a profound statement, and it supports the notion that the Mavs also employed him because the owner thought Wright’s eloquence could be put to good use. “I loved Chris. We sat next to each other on the plane and got to talk, and he helped me out during my Twitter battle with Donald Trump,” Mark Cuban said via email the other day. “He’s a great kid, and he deserves a ton of credit for all the work he’s put in.” Newark Star-Ledger

June 24, 2013 Updates

The Jamboree will feature a show by local rapper Shy Glizzy, a conditioning workout for high school athletes, a St. John’s basketball game, and a pro game including Kevin Durant, Mike Beasley, J.R. Smith, Nolan Smith, and Nick Young, among others; players Wright hopes to call colleagues one day. “I want to play in the NBA,” he said, “Have a long tenure, and hopefully prolong that into whatever’s the next stage of my life.” CSNWashington.com

June 11, 2013 Updates

Bill Oram: 24 guys attending Jazz mini-camp. Brace yourselves: Dee Bost, Will Buford, Xavier Gibson, Drew Gordon, JaMychal Green, Rodney Green, Jorge Gutierrez, Marquez Haynes, Lazar Hayward, Cedric Jackson, Edwin Jackson, Rick Jackson, D.J. Kennedy, Travis Leslie, Rasid Mahalbasic, Toure Murry, Harouna Mutombo, Arinze Onuaku, Josh Owens, Chris Roberts, Henry Sims, Jermaine Taylor, Chris Wright and Luke Zeller. Twitter @tribjazz

March 23, 2013 Updates
March 18, 2013 Updates

Chris Wright, from all outward appearances, looks every bit the professional basketball player, looking for his big break in the NBA like dozens of others. "I feel good, man," Wright said on the floor of AT&T Center in San Antonio Thursday. "I feel like a healthy, 23-year-old young man." For the most part, he is. He has parlayed an excellent season with the NBA Development League's Iowa Energy into a 10-day contract with the Mavericks. But Wright is also the only known current NBA player who has multiple sclerosis. After being diagnosed a year ago, while playing abroad for Olin Edirne, a Turkish team about 125 miles from Istanbul, Wright came home and spent four months recovering and finding the right combination of medicine and treatment. He has been symptom-free since the initial attack, which often happens with so-called "relapsing/remitting" MS sufferers, and with continuing treatment, Wright may experience a partial or complete recovery where the disease does not progress any further. Only time, and how he feels, will tell. NBA.com

For now, Wright's MS does not affect his play. He only has to undergo one two-hour IV drip of his primary drug, Tysabri, every month. There has been no recurrence of the symptoms he suffered in Turkey. He has also been busy with the arrival of his first child with his girlfriend, a son, Chris, Jr. (It's not likely their child will develop MS; there's a 3 percent incidence of children of MS patients developing the disease, according to Crayton.) "If you put it in perspective, it is what it is," Wright said. "I feel like me playing here, it's much bigger than me. It opens up a whole lot of doors for people who have MS. And it gives people inspiration to keep up hope. It's an honor, man. It's an inspiration." NBA.com

For the most part, he is. He has parlayed an excellent season with the NBA Development League's Iowa Energy into a 10-day contract with the Mavericks. But Wright is also the only known current NBA player who has multiple sclerosis. After being diagnosed a year ago, while playing abroad for Olin Edirne, a Turkish team about 125 miles from Istanbul, Wright came home and spent four months recovering and finding the right combination of medicine and treatment. He has been symptom-free since the initial attack, which often happens with so-called "relapsing/remitting" MS sufferers, and with continuing treatment, Wright may experience a partial or complete recovery where the disease does not progress any further. Only time, and how he feels, will tell. Then again, maybe he won't tell. "Even if it was something, I wouldn't let anybody know," Wright said. "It's part of the process. Everybody has pain. It's like an injury." NBA.com

But Wright did not get drafted in 2011, and couldn't hook on with an NBA team as a free agent. He signed with Olin Edirne in August of 2011, and for the first few months, everything was fine. He was the Eurobasket.com Player of the Week in early December, 2011, after posting a double-double. But a couple of months later, everything changed. "I was at practice, and I was running sprints," Wright said. "I was trying to touch the baseline. And I slipped. And I thought it was just, I must've tripped or did something. And as I was walking I felt that I was losing sensation [in his leg], and I had a little pain in my foot. So I went home that night, and my foot started ... it was like your foot going to sleep. And it just constantly felt like that. And I was getting pain from it. So I was like, whatever, and I just played it off. The next day, I got up, and I went in early to shoot, and I lost sensation, basically, on the whole right side of my body. I couldn't feel anything." NBA.com

"It was a tough situation," Wright said. "But they knew they had to release me. Because I physically wasn't able to do anything. I literally could not walk. The next morning I had to crawl to get out the bed. I couldn't walk for about four days." He flew back to Washington, where the staff at Georgetown put him in touch with new doctors. Some of them told him he would never be able to play again and should think about getting into coaching. But Wright's search ultimately led him to Crayton, the medical director of the MS Center of Greater Washington, D.C. and an assistant professor of neurology at Georgetown University Hospital. "She said, 'You can do what you want to do,' " Wright said. "'You've got to monitor yourself.' And I'm doing it. It's been a blessing. I feel good. I haven't had a relapse since." NBA.com

The aggressive treatment has worked so far. After taking four months off to find the right combination of medicine and treatment, Wright wanted to give the NBA another try. But he found word of his disease had gotten ahead of him. Even though Crayton personally told teams Wright was fine, they didn't want to take the risk. "It came up several times," Wright said. "I actually tried to get into summer league. Teams backed out at the last minute, because of the MS. So it definitely came up. Several teams backed off when it came to training camp: We don't want to have that risk factor. Which I understand. It's understandable." NBA.com

Any rumor missing? E-mail us at   hoopshype@hoopshype.com.