HoopsHype Coaching rumors

November 14, 2014 Updates
November 13, 2014 Updates

Q: How are you enjoying TV work compared to coaching? Avery Johnson: At the moment, I love what I’m doing coaching millions of people with the opportunity to work with ESPN on all of our shows. So it’s great. I had a chance to cover the University of Kentucky’s open practice, I’m calling a high school game on Dec. 8, the high school my son attended. He’s now at Texas A&M. I love the opportunity to coach the audience and entertain. Obviously, if a coaching opportunity presents itself then I’ll address that at that time. But I love what I’m doing right now, and that’s what I see myself doing as time wears on. San Antonio Express-News

For his part, Fisher said that putting a date on when a player will get the triangle is not in his thinking. Each players learns it at his own pace. “I don’t know if it’s a fair assessment or not,’’ Fisher said before the Knicks’ 97-95 loss Wednesday night to the Magic — their sixth straight defeat. “[Phil] obviously knows a lot about his offense, but I think it’s more than just a guy is going to get it. Each player and person has different learning curves. I don’t know if there’s a date. “It’s more where our team is from a management standpoint. For me, I don’t have a date on when I would assume a guy should or shouldn’t have it. I’m going to coach him until he’s here or isn’t here. Those won’t be my decisions.’’ New York Post

One practice, Silas noticed James’s mood seemed down. It was routine for Silas’s Cavs to shoot 100 free throws before every practice, and James was refusing to shoot. Silas called the star rookie to his office. From his days with the Celtics and Sonics, Silas knew that respect among players had to be earned. If James was to become a leader on this team, he needed to prove it. The older players wouldn’t follow him just because of his talent. “You’ve got to change,” Silas told him. “What they’re saying means nothing to you. You’re going to be one of the best players ever.” “He changed,” Silas said, noting how James embraced his leadership role on the team. “He changed his attitude and then we got a chance to trade Ricky [Davis] and those guys.” Grantland

Silas coached the Hornets until 2003, piloting the franchise through its move to New Orleans. He was fired after leading the team to a strong 47-35 record, but then falling to the Philadelphia 76ers in the first round of the playoffs. Silas laughed when he recalled how he found out about the firing. Reporters had arrived at his door to ask about it, and Silas simply walked next door to team owner George Shinn’s house. “You don’t want to kick my ass, do you?” Shinn asked, according to Silas. “I grabbed him and said, ‘George, you gave me nothing but a great career. I love you man.’ We became buddies after that, but he thought we were going to go at it.” Grantland

Sterling failed to make deferred compensation payments to players and coaches, he missed payments into the players’ pension fund, and he skimped on the franchise’s operating costs. “We had no practice facility,” Silas said. “He didn’t want to spend money for anybody to do any taping [on players’ankles]. We fired the guy and then I had to do it.” Grantland

Silas once left for China on a National Basketball Players Association exhibition tour. When he returned, he found that all of his belongings from his office had been moved into a hallway. His office had been given to Patricia Simmons, a former model and Sterling companion whom the boss had hired as an assistant general manager. “That was a trip, man,” Silas said. “She knew nothing about basketball. Then the newspaper guys started writing about her, so she started calling me into her office, trying to get me to explain what offense was, how does shooting go and dribbling and all that. I just said, ‘I can’t talk about this. I can tell you, but you’re just not going to know.’” Grantland

November 12, 2014 Updates
November 10, 2014 Updates
November 9, 2014 Updates

He certainly never imagined that his new employers, thanks to the ACB's petty rules, aren't even allowed to list him as a head coach in league play. According to ACB regulations, specifically those ordained by the Spanish coaches association, head coaches must possess a league-sanctioned license as well as FIBA clearance to coach league games. Roth didn't have the license when Sevilla hired him but was assured by his new club that, after a decade as an NBA assistant as well as head-coaching experience in both the D-League and internationally with the Dominican Republic, Sevilla would either have the grounds to obtain the license for him or be able to pay some sort of fine to clear him. ESPN.com

It's a farce that prompted Marca, Spain's biggest daily national sports newspaper, to refer to Roth as Sevilla's Entrenador Fantasma. The Phantom Coach. Suffice it to say none of this was in the brochure when the job was offered. Despite Roth's attempts to round up letters of support in recent weeks from the likes of the NBA, USA Basketball and both the Dominican Republic and Turkish national federations with whom he has worked, Sevilla has yet to convince the ACB that its new coach is already more than worthy of the license. Worse yet, Roth can't do anything to obtain a license in-season, since one of the three required courses is not until June. ESPN.com

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