HoopsHype David Stern rumors

January 16, 2014 Updates

Commissioner David Stern, who is in the final year of a 30-year reign, has even opined about a permanent European presence. To hear Nets players consider the subject this week, it sounds plausible—with a few notable caveats. "I think Europe deserves to have an NBA team, but it's impossible logistics, traveling," said Nets forward and Russian native Andrei Kirilenko. "It has to be the whole division here," he continued, echoing Stern's vision of a five-team European division. "It has to be a lot of teams here. It's not going to be possible if it's only one team playing in Europe and traveling all the way to U.S., playing and coming back." Wall Street Journal

More international investors will follow the example of Brooklyn Nets' Russian owner Mikhail Prokhorov and buy into U.S. basketball, NBA boss David Stern said on Thursday. Wealthy groups in China, the Middle East and Latin America were all potential investors in NBA franchises, Stern said. He believed the sport could absorb the inflationary pressures that flows of foreign money have brought into English soccer's Premier League. "We encourage that movement of capital and we think it is inevitable," NBA Commissioner Stern told reporters, reflecting on the example set by Prokhorov's purchase of the now rebranded New Jersey Nets in 2010. "In addition we also have an operating structure with a salary cap that very much blunts the impact of pure dollars or pounds or roubles," he added. Yahoo! Sports

January 10, 2014 Updates

Dennis Rodman is NOT on Kim Jong-Un's payroll, despite allegations from NBA Commish David Stern ... so says Dennis Rodman. TMZ Sports spoke with Rodman's rep who tells us, "Dennis did not receive, nor has he ever received, any compensation from the North Korean government." Of course, the statement is a direct response to Stern, who told CNN that Dennis only organized the basketball trip to Pyongyang because he was "blinded by a flash of North Korean money." TMZ.com

Team executives are encouraged by a growing perception that incoming commissioner Adam Silver will be more open minded than his predecessor, David Stern, who will hand the reins to Silver on Feb. 1. Though there's little consensus on an idea floated to replace the draft lottery with a "wheel" concept that would lock in the draft order regardless of record, executives view the proposal as a sign of Silver's flexibility and willingness to buck conventional wisdom. CBSSports.com

January 9, 2014 Updates
January 7, 2014 Updates

Stern, commissioner for nearly 30 years, said the league has had preliminary discussions in the past with Pyongyang about a cultural exchange but he wouldn't send any players to North Korea without the OK of the White House. Stern said he believed that these former players agreed to the game for a big payday and didn't think about the political ramifications. CNN.com

On Tuesday, the Silnas, the league and the four former A.B.A. teams will announce a conditional deal that will end the Silnas’ golden annuity. Almost. The Silnas are to receive a $500 million upfront payment, financed through a private placement of notes by JPMorgan Chase and Merrill Lynch, according to three people with direct knowledge of the agreement. The deal would end the enormous perpetual payments and settle a lawsuit filed in federal court by the Silnas that demanded additional compensation from sources of television revenue that did not exist in 1976, including NBA TV, foreign broadcasting of games and League Pass, the service that lets fans watch out-of-market games. New York Times

The N.B.A. has long hoped to be released from its financial obligation to Ozzie and Daniel Silna, brothers who owned the Spirits of St. Louis in the defunct American Basketball Association. But it has never been easy. The Spirits were excluded from the 1976 merger of the two leagues. So the Silnas watched unhappily as the New York (now Brooklyn) Nets, the Denver Nuggets, the Indiana Pacers and the San Antonio Spurs were absorbed into the N.B.A. But the Silnas negotiated an astonishing benefit that was critical to the merger: an agreement to be paid one-seventh of the national television revenue that each of the four teams was to receive, as long as the league continued to exist. That amounted to being paid in perpetuity, and so far, the deal has provided the Silnas with about $300 million. New York Times

Still, the league is not getting rid of the Silnas altogether. They will continue to get some television revenue, some of it from the disputed sources named in their lawsuit, through a new partnership that is to be formed with the Nets, the Pacers, the Nuggets and the Spurs, according to the people with knowledge of the agreement. But at some point, the Silnas can be bought out of their interest in the partnership. The Silnas, of course, did not have to settle. They could have continued to make money from the N.B.A., without ever having to invest in players or build an arena. Clearly, their old agreement would have to be honored as long as the N.B.A. continued to exist. New York Times

But there is a reluctance, more by Daniel, 69, than Ozzie, 80, to keep fighting the league, said one of the people who discussed the agreement. Although wealthy people often plan their estates, much of the Silnas’ riches from the N.B.A. is already in family trusts. Bob Costas, the NBC sportscaster who called Spirits games, said in a telephone interview, “My guess is that for the N.B.A., the upside is that in the foreseeable future, there will come a time when they will not have to look at this and blanch and it will be in the past.” New York Times

January 6, 2014 Updates
December 28, 2013 Updates
December 23, 2013 Updates

It’s less than two months before commissioner David Stern steps down and is succeeded by Adam Silver, but the potential relocation issue has crept up again with the Bucks as owner HerbKohl is seeking additional investors to help keep the team in Milwaukee. The Bradley Center is the worst facility in the league and Stern has encouraged owners and the city to develop an arena plan after the Sacramento Kings saved their team with a new project. Meanwhile, the city of Seattle is waiting for a team so it can begin its arena construction. Boston Globe

December 20, 2013 Updates
December 18, 2013 Updates
December 16, 2013 Updates

The Milwaukee Bucks are trying to stay the Milwaukee Bucks. Commissioner Davis Stern gave his thoughts: “Senator Kohl bought the Bucks in 1985 in order to ensure the team would remain in Milwaukee. During his extraordinary stewardship his goal remained the same -- to bring the fans of Wisconsin high-quality basketball from a team they would be proud to call their ‘home’ team. With this announcement, Senator Kohl continues his mission: to assure continuity of ownership by broadening its ownership base, and assuring that the fans of Wisconsin will enjoy NBA basketball and other events in a new state-of-the-art facility.” Sulia

December 8, 2013 Updates

The cancellation of the Spurs-Timberwolves game Wednesday in Mexico City because of smoke in the arena caused by a generator malfunction was a small blow to commissioner David Stern’s quest to play additional games in other countries. While games in London have gone off without a glitch, an NBA regular-season game in Mexico City was risky from the start and the Spurs and Timberwolves must now reschedule the game for Minneapolis, much to the chagrin of San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich. Both teams wasted valuable travel time to get to Mexico City, so the league is obviously going to think twice about returning there. Deputy commissioner Adam Silver, who will assume Stern’s duties in February, told the Globe last month the league plans to play more games in other countries but a potential expansion team in Europe may be years away. Boston Globe

December 5, 2013 Updates

Before Williams returned to Philadelphia, Hewitt turned what seemed like an innocuous question into a bolt out of the blue. "He drove me out to the airport, and I just said, 'If pro basketball were to go in Florida, where would you put the team, Miami or Tampa?' That really got him upset," Williams recalled. "He said, 'Neither place. You'd put it right here in Orlando.' And I remember saying as we got to the airport, 'Well, Jimmy, if you really believe that, you might get a hold of David Stern and just see what's going on.' And I thought no more of it. The next week, I'm back in my office in Philadelphia. The phone rings, and it's Jimmy saying, 'Bubba, we've got an appointment with David Stern in New York. We're going up to see him next week.' " FOXSports Florida

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