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April 7, 2015 Updates

Controversial officiating has been a running theme of the NCAA tournament, and there were some suspect calls during Duke’s win over Wisconsin Monday night in Indianapolis. Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan vented his frustration with officials on live television after the loss. In his interview outside the locker room just minutes after the final buzzer sounded, Ryan said that there was more contact in the national title game than any other game the Badgers played all year. “You just have to be able to handle all the hands and the checking. There was more body contact in this game than any game we’ve played all year, and I just feel sorry for my guys that all of a sudden a game was like that. I think they had a… they’re struggling with that a little bit. We missed some opportunities, they hit some tough shots, but you know — it’s just a shame that it had to be played that way.” For The Win

April 7, 2014 Updates

It’s not hard to find the professional cynics — even when you’re not looking for them. In the NBA, skepticism is a growth industry. Brad Stevens was still en route to Orlando from his introductory press conference when, amid the glowing reports, the snide comments began. The surprise of his hiring hadn’t even worn off when people openly but quietly began wondering how long he’d actually stay with the Celtics before bolting back to a college bench, the six-year contract be damned. Sniffed one NBA lifer, “He’ll stay with Boston until the Duke job opens up.” Boston Herald

March 21, 2014 Updates

In an interview with Reese Waters of Bleacher Report, Grant Hill has his theory as to why Duke is so hated by some: “We’ve had a lot of really good white players, I think that plays a role.” He also notes how most of the fans in the stands are white, calling it “white on white hate.” Jalen Rose, a couple of years ago, had a different interpretation of why he hated Duke. The Big Lead

June 8, 2011 Updates

A former Duke University basketball team captain jumped to his death Tuesday from the roof of a private athletic club in Midtown, police sources said. Tom Emma, 49, jumped from atop the New York Athletic Club at 180 Central Park South shortly before 11:30 a.m. Police found his body on the second-story landing of the Jumeirah Essex House next door. He was dead, cops said. New York Daily News

April 28, 2011 Updates

Hill also revealed he was supposed to participate in Rose’s controversial Fab Five documentary. “I was excited to see the story and see this documentary,” Hill said. “With the exception of one part, I thought it was well done.” Rose described Duke’s African-American players as “Uncle Toms.” Hill was most bothered by the post-documentary discussion Rose participated in on ESPN and the impact the controversy had on Hill’s two daughters. “When I was nine years old, you could get somewhat shielded from that, but now with the way kids receive information ... my 9-year-old knew about it,” Hill said. “I’m on the road and she’s calling me, ‘Why is someone calling you an Uncle Tom? What does that mean?’ That certainly played into me wanting to respond to that ... I get and understand sort of what he was trying to say. It wasn’t even so much the doc as it was the response the next day on ‘First and 10’ and the various platforms ESPN has to promote. And (Rose) was asked, ‘Do you still feel that way?’ And to not answer that, to me, said a lot. But like I said, we’ve talked. I don’t think he feels that way.” FOXSports.com

March 27, 2011 Updates
March 25, 2011 Updates

Should you guys have made it more clear that what you may have felt 20 years ago as teenagers at Michigan might be different than you feel now? Juwan Howard: You have to keep in mind that it was how people felt 20 years ago. And people are entitled to their opinion. I respect Grant, of course, taking the stand that he did. If it was me, would I have done it? No. But that's just me. I have a lot of respect for Grant as a person. And I have a lot of respect for Christian Laettner. If you really listen to the remarks, I think Jalen did an excellent job of not only telling how he felt at the time, but he also praised them. ESPN.com

March 22, 2011 Updates

ESPN for the last two years rolled out a series of documentaries but none of them has gotten the reaction and buzz of your “Fab Five” documentary that aired on March 13. Time Magazine described the reaction as a “media firestorm.” Did you anticipate the reaction that you got from the film? JALEN ROSE: I absolutely did. That’s why the entire time it was noted that the revolution will be televised. That’s why it was very important for the story to be told 20 years later, as opposed to five years, 10 years, or even 15 years because a lot of issues that were noted in the documentary, a lot of the conversation we discussed in the documentary, and a lot of the situations that we exposed — good, bad or indifferent — I knew a lot of people weren’t going to be ready for, and/or were uncomfortable hearing them, especially knowing that a lot of it was true. ChrisWebber.com

Grant Hill was so taken aback by that criticism that he wrote an op-ed piece for The New York Times. What was your reaction to what Grant Hill wrote? JALEN ROSE: It was very eloquently put, the soliloquy he did for The New York Times. And I understand where he’s coming from. I’m pretty sure, whether it’s family members, friends, or the media, a lot of people have instigated this to a point where it’s become irresponsible journalism. I’ve heard people question whether Jalen Rose is a racist, I’ve heard people question whether I still feel that way now. The documentary clearly noted about how we felt about an opponent. [Grant Hill] was someone I was competing against. And what set the tenor of the documentary, (ESPN Analyst) Dick Vitale summed it up best when he said: “Michigan, they don’t represent the clean cut, All American kind of guy.” Well, that’s what Grant Hill represented. ChrisWebber.com

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