HoopsHype Ed Macauley rumors

November 9, 2011 Updates

“Easy” Ed Macauley was at the center of one of the most important trades in NBA history: He was the key man sent from Boston to the St. Louis Hawks in exchange for just-drafted Bill Russell. Of course, Russell and Red Auerbach’s Celtics now seem fated for one another, forever linked by their 11 championships, but Big Russ might never have landed in Boston had Easy Ed just said no. Celtics owner Walter Brown actually asked the 6-8, 190-pound center—an All-Star in each of his six seasons in Boston and the MVP of the very first ASG—for permission to ship him to St. Louis. Ed was happy to return to his hometown, so Hawks GM Marty Blake (yes, that Marty Blake) agreed to take Russell with the second pick in the ’56 Draft and ship him to Boston in exchange for second-year pro Macauley and Cliff Hagan, the former Kentucky star returning from a military stint. SLAM

SLAM: What stands out most about the night Pettit scored 50 in Game 6 of the ’58 Finals? EM: All I remember is telling my teammates, “I’ll break your arm if you shoot. Give the ball to Bobby.” He was unstoppable, and it was one of the unsung phenomenal games anyone has played: 50 points in the deciding game against Russell and the Celtics? Bob was a very difficult cover because he could move enough to beat anyone one-on-one, and he was one of the first men who started weight training, which we were told would make us muscle-bound and unable to shoot. Once he developed the strength to go with his toughness and skills, he was impossible to guard. You could not knock him off his shot or away from the rebound. SLAM

Ed Macauley, one of the NBA’s first big stars who won a championship with the St. Louis Hawks and was traded by the Boston Celtics for Bill Russell, has died. He was 83. Saint Louis University announced Macauley’s death on Tuesday. The school had no other details. “Easy Ed” was a standout player with the Billikens, leading them to the 1948 NIT title. Washington Times

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