HoopsHype Greg Miller rumors

February 6, 2012 Updates

Less than three days after Miller used Twitter to call Malone a liar and then wrote a lengthy blog post ripping the first-ballot Hall of Famer, Stern acknowledged it’s been painful to watch their fiery standoff from afar. The commissioner wants their public dispute to end, and hopes they will unite in the future and find common ground. “I’m looking forward to the next meeting between Greg and Karl,” said Stern, during an exclusive, wide-ranging interview with The Salt Lake Tribune at the league office. “Not for the sparks that I expect will fly, but for the calming that I think will and should occur. Because [Malone’s] meant so much to the franchise and the city over the years and to the Miller family, and the Miller family has meant so much to the franchise and the city for so many years.” Salt Lake Tribune

February 5, 2012 Updates

Reached by phone Saturday, Karl Malone was asked whether Sloan lacked support from management that night in the locker room in 2011. "The only thing I can tell you is that's great. But there's nothing that can be said or done to hurt my relationship with Jerry Sloan," Malone said. "That's just the way it is. That's awesome. But when I feel a certain way about a friend, Jerry and Karl is a friendship to the end, not just lip service." Deseret News

Corbin said he hoped his players wouldn't let the well-publicized dispute bother them. "It's a part of our family. It's a part of who we are. You just deal with it and move forward," Corbin said. "Hopefully, they get past it as soon as they can so we can go back and play ball. … It could be a distraction. Hopefully, we won't let it be." Corbin said Miller didn't pressure or advise him to avoid hiring Malone as an assistant coach — something the Mailman has said he'd consider. "It had nothing to do with it," said Corbin, who added Sidney Lowe (assistant) and Michael Sanders (player development) to his staff in the offseason. Deseret News

After Karl Malone responded defiantly Saturday to a scathing blog post by Utah Jazz CEO Greg Miller, fellow Hall of Famer John Stockton suggested the two need to call a quick truce. If the verbal sparring continues, Stockton feared it might “tarnish” what the organization accomplished during the Jazz’s decade of championship contention in the 1990s. “I’ve certainly been in disputes with people as close to me as my brother,” Stockton said from his home in Spokane, Wash. “You get after it and say a lot of things. “But I have never seen one [disagreement] that couldn’t be resolved by sitting down and talking to a person face to face. It has always worked for me.” Salt Lake Tribune

With Malone and Stockton as the foundation, the Jazz reached two NBA Finals and three Western Conference finals between 1992 and 1998. Malone remains the No. 2 scorer in league history. Stockton is the all-time leader in assists and steals. “What we all shared is so special,” Stockton said. “I just hope this can be resolved, because it was a special time for me and for everyone. I’d hate to see anything outside the lines … ever come back and tarnish it.” Salt Lake Tribune

February 4, 2012 Updates

But in the statement, Sloan said that was not how it occurred. “I would like to set the record straight regarding my retirement from the Utah Jazz ,” he said. “I had the unwavering support of the Miller family during my 23 seasons as head coach with the franchise and I left on my own volition. It is not true that the Millers undermined my authority as head coach. I had their complete backing to run the team as I wished and was assured that no player could ever overrule my decisions. “The Millers encouraged me to stay with the team and gave me multiple opportunities to do so. They felt strongly that I should wait at least until the end of the season to resign and did everything they could to keep me coaching. Deseret News

Greg Miller: My dad accepted that because Karl gave everything he had as a player, and he brought 25 and 10 every night. The benefits were clearly there. I have tried to leave it at that and respect him for what he’s done for the Utah Jazz. I’ve bitten my tongue time and again when Karl has made derogatory comments. I’ve tried to keep in mind the words of one of my mentors close to the situation who said “Karl Malone is giant pain in the ass, but he’s our pain in the ass.” Greg In Utah

Greg Miller: The fact is Karl is still as high-maintenance as he ever was, but now he has nothing to offer to offset the grief and aggravation that comes with him. Some would argue that he could coach our big men. I would love to have Karl inspire them and teach him how to be warriors like he was. That can’t happen. Karl is too unreliable and too unstable. Let me explain. Greg In Utah

Greg Miller: When I was the general manager of the Honda dealership Karl and John Stockton co-owned in Sandy, Utah, I was responsible to coordinate the grand opening. John and Karl agreed to sign autographs for one hour beginning at 3:00 as part of the ceremony. People started lining up first thing in the morning and by 3:00 there were hundreds of people lined up throughout the dealership. John arrived three minutes early and had a seat at the autograph table. At 3:15 Karl still wasn’t there. Concerned about keeping John longer than agreed, I made the decision to have John start signing autographs. Karl showed up at 3:30. Some people stayed around and formed a second line to get Karl’s autograph, but most left disappointed and angry. Greg In Utah

Greg Miller: A couple of years later there was a lockout in the NBA. By then, the Honda dealership was established, employing about 85 people. Karl co-hosted a radio show at that time and made some comments on the air about wanting to play for a team “in a town where it rains” and when the lockout was over he’d “demand to be traded”. His comments were well documented. The next day car sales dropped by half. Karl continued to make similar comments on his show. After a few days I drove to the studio that broadcast his show and waited until his show was over to speak with him. I told him I respected his right to say whatever he wanted, but that his comments were keeping customers away. I suggested he consider the impact his comments were having on his partner(s) and on the 85 people whose livelihoods depended on customers coming to his dealership. I still remember the surprised look on his face when I pointed those things out to him. Thankfully, that was the end of his trade demands. Greg In Utah

Greg Miller: Some years later Karl scheduled and cancelled or blew off a number of lunch appointments with me. On three separate occasions Karl had one of his assistants schedule a lunch appointment with me. The first time Karl never showed up. When I called his assistant I was told that Karl had something come up and he wouldn’t be able to join me. We rescheduled. I got a call on the way to the second appointment a few weeks later to tell me Karl couldn’t make it. That happened again the third time a month or so later. Greg In Utah

Greg Miller: A year ago, when Jerry retired, Karl rushed to Salt Lake City. He got in front of every camera he could find at the first game following Jerry’s departure. He positioned himself as an authority on Jerry’s departure by saying something like “the Jerry Sloan I know isn’t a quitter. He left because he didn’t feel wanted.” Karl wasn’t in the locker room during the conversations with me and Jerry. Had he been, he would have seen me (and my mom) do everything possible to convince Jerry to stay. By his own admission Karl hadn’t spoken to Jerry since Jerry left. Karl’s comments on the radio and on national television made an already stressful situation worse. Then in his next breath, on national television, Karl asked me to hire him as a coach. Greg In Utah

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