HoopsHype Jarron Collins rumors

July 3, 2014 Updates
March 14, 2014 Updates
March 13, 2014 Updates

Former NBA player and Stanford standout Jarron Collins joined me for an interview on the radio show (12-3p on 750-AM) to talk NCAA basketball, NBA's playoff race, and his twin brother, Jason, who is the first openly gay player in the league. "I'm very proud of my brother," Jarron said. "I had no idea he was in the closet for so long. When I found out I was definitely surprised when he told me. Then again, it's all about acceptance and love. That's my brother and I'm going to support him." Oregonian

February 23, 2014 Updates

Collins' twin brother and former NBA player, Jarron Collins, hinted at the forthcoming excitement via Twitter not long after the new of Davis' intentions was first reported by USA TODAY Sports. "Hope everyone is enjoying their Sunday. Today should be a pretty cool day!" USA Today Sports

October 24, 2013 Updates

The veteran center's twin brother said Thursday that Jason has trained feverishly in his native Los Angeles the past few months in hopes of earning a contract offer for the upcoming NBA season. Jason has supplemented his usual offseason weightlifting and plyometrics regimen with long runs in the mountains and wind sprints while wearing a 30-pound weight vest. "I know it's a cliche to say he's in the best shape of his life, but I really think Jason is," former NBA center Jarron Collins said while working at the West Coast Conference's Tip-Off Luncheon. "He's at five percent body fat. He's as strong as he has ever been. He continues to train and work out. If the opportunity presents itself, he'll be ready to go." Yahoo! Sports

October 11, 2013 Updates

In the seven months since his brother Jason Collins came out as the first publicly gay athlete in the four major professional sports, Jarron Collins has done his best to support him. Right now that means staying positive, while his 34-year-old fraternal twin waits to see if an NBA team will offer him an opportunity to continue his career. "He's in the best shape of his life. I've never seen him as physically strong as he is now," Jarron Collins told ESPN on Thursday. "So from that standpoint, he's good to go if he's given the opportunity and I'm optimistic he will. "It's one of those things where you just have to see." ESPN.com

September 30, 2013 Updates

Former NBA athletes Baron Davis and Jarron Collins teamed up with current free agent Jason Collins and J.J. Redick of the LA Clippers for a Sunday afternoon of basketball and video games at Common Sense Media's GameOn! Fundraiser in Los Angeles. The family-friendly event, which took place at Sony Pictures Studios, attracted over 500 attendees who were treated to sneak peeks of upcoming video games like Skylanders SWAP Force and basketball games led by the NBA players. Huffington Post

May 16, 2013 Updates

Jarron joked Wednesday on ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live that he missed "red flags" about Jason, who recently came out as the first active gay male athlete in one of the major U.S. sports. The brothers, who played together at Stanford before playing in the NBA, appeared together on the show and discussed how Jason finally let Jarron know after being hesitant for so long. "He's my best friend and any time you come out to someone, you always have that apprehension that they're going to reject, even though I knew that that wasn't going to be the case," Jason Collins said. NBA.com

Jarron was supportive but said he botched his response at first, saying things such as "Are you sure?" and "Since when?" "He's my twin brother, of course I was going to be supportive of him all the time," Jarron said. Jarron said since Jason's announcement, he's been approached by other men asking if he is Jason. To help clear that up, Kimmel gave him a T-shirt that read: "I'm the straight one." NBA.com

May 10, 2013 Updates

Being mistaken for your sibling is a daily part of life for identical twins. The mistaken identity has a little more meaning now for ex-NBA player Jarron Collins after his brother, Jason, recently became the first active male pro athlete in a major American sport to announce he was gay. "I get people looking at me, especially kids, teenagers," Jarron Collins said after a television appearance Thursday night. "They look at me and they do the double-take. They look at their smart phones and double-check for a profile pic. But I would say that the interaction in public has been supportive. It's, 'Hey are you Jason?' 'No, I'm Jarron.' 'I just love what your brother did,' sort of thing. Yahoo! Sports

Jason Collins had 41 points and 60 rebounds while playing in 38 games with Boston and Washington this past season and has 713 games of NBA experience. He is hopeful to get signed this offseason. "He's gearing up like he always does in the summer to come back and do his thing next season," Jarron Collins said. "Whether or not he gets the opportunity remains to be seen. I'm optimistic that teams will value my brother. I understand you have to take into account everything in its totality. "But my brother, when it comes down to it as a basketball player, I hope that the guys in the locker room, the coaches and hopefully the people evaluating say, 'OK, he's gay. But what does he bring to the team?' You're talking about a guy who has played 12 years, is extremely professional and, talking to his coaches, is a pro's pro." Yahoo! Sports

May 5, 2013 Updates

Jarron laughed, realizing that his brother’s announcement was not only career-defining but also life-defining. Now a part-time commentator and scout with the Los Angeles Clippers, Jarron couldn’t be more supportive of his brother. “It’s been a very interesting last few days,” he said. “I definitely understand the mind-set of his decision to come forward, being that he’s the first gay [male] athlete to go public with his intentions. I look forward to the day when this isn’t news when somebody comes out. Having said that, it’s kind of cool that my brother got phone calls from President Clinton and President Obama, Oprah [Winfrey], definitely weird to see CNN breaking news on my brother’s sexuality, but again, it is a very bold step my brother took and I admire him and support him.” Boston Globe

“My brother, it took him a little bit longer to know himself and to know how he feels comfortable with who he is and accepting of who he is, but we each know who we are as individuals,” Jarron said. “It’s not an issue. It was always the Collins twins, ‘are you Jason or Jarron?’ But now it’s Jason Collins, the first pro sport athlete who is [publicly] gay, and Jarron Collins. We’re separate in that sense.” Boston Globe

“I don’t want and Jason doesn’t want the fact that he’s gay to define who he is,” Jarron said. “That’s just part of who he is. My brother is someone who, his teammates can speak for him, coaches, general managers, anybody . . . he’s that hard-working, character guy that you don’t have to worry about in the locker room. He’s a guy that is going to put his work in, be supportive, be a great teammate, and who could not play for three weeks and some foul trouble happens and you don’t have to worry that he’s going to be late on a defensive rotation. He’s dependable in what he does.” Boston Globe

May 1, 2013 Updates

As an 11-year NBA veteran, Jarron Collins was optimistic the reaction to twin brother Jason Collins' announcement that he is gay would be a positive one. Still, as the brothers met Tuesday morning to work out and catch up after a momentous day, Jarron said they agreed the response had been better than anyone could have anticipated. "I was optimistic. I could see the culture and the climate changing. I think all of us can," Jarron Collins said Tuesday in an interview with ESPNLosAngeles.com. "The incident with the 49ers, Chris Culliver, where he made some statements. ... That right there showed you the temperature had changed to when, 'You're out of line, and they're going to call you on it.' ESPN.com

Jarron said he appreciated the public support from NBA veterans Kobe Bryant and Dwyane Wade, among others, and public figures such as President Barack Obama, former President Bill Clinton, musician Lance Bass and talk show host Oprah Winfrey. "That's what leaders do," Jarron said of the support. "The league has set the tone for how it's going to be. You need those active, perennial All-Stars that set the tone for how the rest of the league is going to act." ESPN.com

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