HoopsHype Joe Lacob rumors

November 12, 2013 Updates

Q: How did you guys talk Andre Iguodala into signing here when you were capped out this summer? Joe Lacob, majority owner of the Golden State Warriors: “It’s interesting, during one of the playoff games in Denver, I was sitting on the floor. It turned out per chance, that one of his cousins was sitting behind us. We introduced and got to know him during the first game. When we came back for the second game, he made it pretty clear that Andre liked the Warriors, liked the organization. Obviously, I couldn’t talk about that at the time, but when he did become a free agent, I didn’t have to sell a lot. He was pretty sold. He sees how we do things, and the word gets out among the players. We get approached all of the time by agents with really big names who say, ‘Hey, when my guy’s contract is up, we’d really like to consider playing for the Warriors, because you’re building something the right way.’ We can’t talk to them, because it’s illegal, but you can see that we’re building something for the future, and people can sense that.” San Francisco Chronicle

Joe Lacob: With Curry, Bob (Myers) and I felt strongly that we had rarely seen an ankle destroy somebody's career. A knee, yes. But ankles usually recover. And we had to make a decision on a guy who was everything we wanted to represent the franchise. He's a great player and person. He also had to take a risk. It was risky, but assuming he was going to be healthy we thought we were getting a pretty good deal. I'm sure he'll make plenty of money in his career, get it back someday if he feels he is underpaid. He certainly could make that argument. We felt the ankle wasn't going to destroy his career. CSNBayArea.com

Joe Lacob: With Bogut, you have to look back and say, yes, he has been injury-prone. There is a big risk here that we're going to be signed up for four years on a guy who may not play as much as we'd like. But you have to look at free agency next summer. There's not a lot. We would be fighting, like we were two years ago, looking for a center. We like Festus Ezeli, but we believe in being good and big and having depth. We had to take a chance. We decided he plays the exact type of basketball that we want to base our team around. So, let's take a chance. Hey, you're not going to win on all these things. But he fits very, very well with what we're trying to build. CSNBayArea.com

Q: Was there a single wisest move along the way? Joe Lacob: It's hard to point to one move. But the hiring of Jerry West is, from the standpoint of the average fan and even to the rest of the NBA, representative. He's had five decades of success. Having him being associated with us, and being very committed to the change we're trying to bring out, that certainly was a big move that started us in the right direction. Hiring Mark Jackson was not as clear to people, but it was very important. And then the Monta Ellis trade (sigh) . . . while difficult for a lot of people to handle, was probably a representative move that needed to happen to turn the team over to Steph as our emerging leader. It had to be done. And it also represented bringing in Bogut, even though he wasn't healthy, because it showed our commitment to changing what and who we were as a team – defense, size and rebounding. CSNBayArea.com

Q: Was there a single toughest moment? A: Personally, the booing. It was a little unexpected. Perhaps it should have been more expected. That was a very tough individual moment. But from an organizational standpoint, it was the number of people we had to let go. That's what no one ever sees. We wanted to see what we had, give everybody a chance, when we took over. But in May and June and July of 2011, even into September, we made a lot of changes. At one point we had like 50 positions open. We had a business to run. People were going to show up to watch basketball games and there was nobody to run this place. There was a moment of absolute fear. We were very fortunate to start at the top, getting a commitment from Rick Welts to be president and chief operating officer. There was a scary 30-60 days before we opened the season, because we did not know who was going to run the show. CSNBayArea.com

Q: On another topic, do you still believe it's doable to build an arena in San Francisco by 2017? A: I do. I'm an optimist. There are people who, from day one, said it's not going to be possible. No one ever said it's going to be easy. Unlike Sacramento, which is getting $300 million in public money, this is a privately financed arena. Not only is it privately financed, but it's costing $200 million more than an equivalent arena somewhere else because we're fixing the foundation, the piers, for the city. So it's literally a gift to the city of San Francisco. This is not just a condominium project or something like that. This is a civic gift, in many ways. It's something that all of the people can use, not just the Warriors. Not everyone is going to agree on this, but we think the majority of San Franciscans support this. To be attacked by someone like Art Agnos, who is a voice of the past . . . to say that we are billionaires trying to take over the city is a joke. That's absurd and it's insulting. What is he trying to do for the city? We're trying to do something positive. It is going to be tough. We're going to have to convince him and others – or outvote them – that what we're doing is in the best interest of the majority of San Franciscans and people of the Bay Area. We're going to try like hell to do it by 2017. But if it takes longer, it takes longer. We want something everyone can appreciate, use and be proud of. Just like the Golden Gate Bridge in the 1930s, nobody wanted it. Now it's a great thing. CSNBayArea.com

October 6, 2013 Updates

From the sounds of it, the big, geeky glasses Iguodala wears aren’t just for looks, unlike some of his NBA brethren. He says he has gone to seminars about investing and how to run a team, and hopes to own an NBA and a WNBA franchise. He plans to pick the brain of Warriors owner and successful venture capitalist Joe Lacob, and calls himself the “biggest fan” of Larry Ellison, the CEO of Oracle Corp., based in Santa Clara, Calif. He interned at Bank of America Merrill Lynch during the lockout two years ago. NESN.com

October 4, 2013 Updates

Not so, says team owner Joe Lacob, who was part of the group making its presentation to Howard. “I don’t like to focus on those who aren’t here,” Lacob told SN as part of an exclusive conversation this week. “Good luck in Houston, Mr. Howard. And I am sure he will help that team, they will be better. But we would not have gone after him if we didn’t think we had a chance or that it made sense. … We were a lot closer than people realize to perhaps that actually happening, (Howard) coming here. I think that is a testament to what is happening here. He was affected by the presentation that he saw by our ownership and our management.” Sporting News

The Warriors probably would have had to execute a sign-and-trade deal involving Bogut in order to get Howard to Golden State. “I will say that it was a little bit of a difficult decision to get involved at all because we really like Andrew Bogut a lot,” Lacob said. “We were very happy to go forward with Andrew, and that’s what is happening. But it’s not a secret that we were in that discussion. … We always want to be in the conversation for great players to the extent that we think they would fit in terms of what we’re trying to build. And I can tell you we are really happy with the way things turned out.” Sporting News

September 30, 2013 Updates

Bob Myers has a fabulous job, with a salary that allows him to live anywhere he likes, visit any place he chooses. On this particular day, as soft clouds hover above the Bay Area, the Warriors general manager chooses state prison. He's not alone. Another member of the one-percent club, Warriors coach Mark Jackson, a former NBA star, also arrives at the joint. These two one-percenters are voluntarily rubbing shoulders -- literally -- with men serving time at this world-famous lockup on the north shore of San Francisco Bay. Myers and Jackson and Warriors assistant coach Brian Scalabrine, one year removed from playing in the NBA, are joined by other members of the Warriors organization, including assistant general manager Kirk Lacob, the son majority owner Joe Lacob. Contra Costa Times

August 16, 2013 Updates
July 19, 2013 Updates
July 4, 2013 Updates
July 1, 2013 Updates
June 29, 2013 Updates

Dwight Howard will not visit the Warriors when free agency opens, contrary to an earlier report, a source familiar with Howard's thinking says. Warriors owner Joe Lacob hinted -- he can't do more without risking a fine from the league -- that the team would welcome the chance to meet with Howard, but it's easy to see why going to Golden State would be problematic for Howard. The only way they could get him would be via a sign-and-trade with the Lakers, which means he wouldn't be joining the same Warriors' team that did so well last season. Sulia

June 28, 2013 Updates
June 3, 2013 Updates

In an interview with USA TODAY Sports, West made it clear that his role in assisting Ranadive has been severely overstated by several media reports and said he took exception to the idea that he would be the unofficial point man in the process. "For some reason, I've gotten two or three calls from people (wanting the job) saying that (they) want to get in front of him and could you help, and I think it's ludicrous," West said. "I sent back to them and said that in no way, shape or form am I advising him – period. I believe that if you make an obligation to someone … and my obligation is always to (Warriors owner) Joe (Lacob) and the rest of the Warriors organization, and I have no interest in helping anyone, OK? Anyone except if I can help the Warriors obviously." USA Today Sports

May 29, 2013 Updates
May 28, 2013 Updates

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