HoopsHype Karl Malone rumors

October 17, 2013 Updates

"I'm not concerned with your elbow pads, your knee pads, all of your garb and your full body armor. What do you need all that for? Our soldiers need that in Iraq and they're doing a hell of a job for us. Take all that off! We don't need that. What I need you to do is show up and be ready to play. That's it. "I had one of my ‘bigs' today and he had body armor from his thigh to his neck. I ask him what he was doing and he said he was protecting himself. I said 'Who you protecting yourself [from]?' There's no sniper in this building! Man up! If you're hurt, see the trainer and play the game. "When I played, if you came out there with a sleeve on your elbow, I won't say 'I'm going to attack it,' but you're a wounded animal and I've got to take a stab at it. I like where we're at, but let's get rid of all that and play the game, encourage your teammates," Malone said. KSL.com

October 14, 2013 Updates

Malone was able to bash his way towards most of those 41,689 career regular and postseason points despite wearing no padding on his person, while somehow not suffering a major (or even minor, really) injury until his final season in 2003-04. With that credibility in place, Karl doesn’t really understand why the modern set needs to cloak itself in all manner of protection. From Ron Zundel and KSL.com: "I'm not concerned with your elbow pads, your knee pads, all of your garb and your full body armor. What do you need all that for? Our soldiers need that in Iraq and they're doing a hell of a job for us. Take all that off! We don't need that. What I need you to do is show up and be ready to play. That's it. Yahoo! Sports

October 10, 2013 Updates

The Mailman is serious about delivering his knowledge to the Utah Jazz big men — until his hunting trip in November. "To keep me from being late to practices I didn't bring my [camouflage], gun or a bow. I left them home so my focus was to come here every day." he said. KSL.com

Karl, of course, is 'old school' and he is trying to get used to the methods and approaches of the younger generation. In vintage Mailman style, he shared his feelings on a few things: "I'm not concerned with your elbow pads, your knee pads, all of your garb and your full body armor. What do you need all that for? Our soldiers need that in Iraq and they're doing a hell of a job for us. Take all that off! We don't need that. What I need you to do is show up and be ready to play. That's it. "I had one of my ‘bigs' today and he had body armor from his thigh to his neck. I ask him what he was doing and he said he was protecting himself. I said 'Who you protecting yourself [from]?' There's no sniper in this building! Man up! If you're hurt, see the trainer and play the game. KSL.com

October 3, 2013 Updates

Isiah didn’t hold back during shooting for the premiere of the critically acclaimed show’s third season (it will air on Oct. 8 at 6 p.m. ET on NBA TV) . In fact, he made sure “Open Court” will get off to an explosive start when he identified his former rival and fellow Hall of Famer Karl Malone as the man who cost the Utah Jazz a title. “I thought Utah, going back to that team, I thought they had everything it took to win a championship,” he said. “They had the system, the players, the toughness, they were defensive-minded and everything. I always thought like Malone was the weakest link because he wasn’t a good foul shooter. Had he been a good foul shooter they would have beat Chicago.” NBA.com

When pressed by Johnson about using the term “weak link” in regards to Malone, Thomas didn’t flinch. “That’s a weak link, because at the end of a game when you are playing at that level, you come down to the last 30 seconds or the last minute of the game, if that guy can’t make fouls shots then he’s the weak link. He’s the guy that you are fouling, the guy you want to put on the line. You’re not fouling [John] Stockton. You’re not putting him on the line, you’re not letting him take the shot. Everything is going to Malone. I thought Malone’s inability to hit free throws is what stopped them from winning a championship.” NBA.com

September 30, 2013 Updates
September 27, 2013 Updates
September 9, 2013 Updates

Gentleman, scholar and international diplomat Dennis Rodman says he’s been invited to bring a team of 12 former NBA players to play in a basketball tournament in North Korea early next year. Rodman, who recently returned from a second trip to North Korea to visit his buddy Kim Jong-un, said he would try and assemble a team that includes Karl Malone and Scottie Pippen, among others, to play in the tournament, which is scheduled for next January and totally sounds real and not like the plot to a screwball 1980s comedy. “I’m not a joke,” Rodman said at a press conference, while sitting in front of a bust of his own head and next to the owner of an Irish bookmaking site. “Take me seriously.” For The Win

September 2, 2013 Updates

You say Stockton was the hardest to guard, but what about guarding Michael Jordan? Gary Payton: "Those battles were a little easier. I would have Jordan get mad at me and go back at me. He knew he was really talented and could do whatever he wanted to. But [Stockton] was more of a challenge to me than guarding someone that would talk back to me. When you talk back to me and say something to me it made my game go to another level. John was one who wouldn't say nothing and you couldn't figure him out. He'd keep going in the pick and rolls and he and Karl Malone would score a big bucket. At times I would guard Jordan and get him mad and into other things." Yahoo! Sports

August 7, 2013 Updates
July 24, 2013 Updates
July 23, 2013 Updates

Former Utah Jazz star Karl Malone, who turns 50 on Wednesday, has made one concession to age. He bought a mule. During 18 seasons with the Jazz and one with the Los Angeles Lakers, Malone was known as a fitness fanatic who willed himself into the Hall of Fame. "In 30 years," says Jazz strength coach Mark McKown," I’ve never seen anybody with the same capacity for work, the same drive or the same intensity." Salt Lake Tribune

There’s another reason Malone still weighs 256 pounds — his playing weight. One of his new projects is mentoring the Jazz’s young players — specifically power forward Derrick Favors and center Enes Kanter. "I always had a suspicion, at some point, I’d be back involved with some organization," Malone said. "When I stepped back on the floor, I wanted to look like a coach. I wanted to look like I belonged. I thought it might help the young guys listen to me." Salt Lake Tribune

July 22, 2013 Updates
July 9, 2013 Updates

Even more troublesome: Some new teammates began to grumble about their roles behind Stockton and Malone. They complained of favoritism coach Jerry Sloan allegedly showed his 40-something stars by not making them participate in every practice. "Things just started to add up," Stockton said. "Things that started to worry me had never worried me before. Things that started to bother me had never bothered me before. The aches and pains I felt, I had never felt before. My reaction to it — instead of attacking it — was an indication it was time [to retire]. That was the message." When told it sounded like his final season was a truly unhappy one, Stockton said, "I don’t want people to feel sorry for me. I had a great time. It was a great part of my life. But you can’t play forever." Salt Lake Tribune

June 29, 2013 Updates
June 28, 2013 Updates
June 27, 2013 Updates

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