HoopsHype Latrell Sprewell rumors

August 11, 2014 Updates

DS: You know, over the years, we were working on so many different -- you mean, when we were working with Magic Johnson and HIV, or dealing with Latrell Sprewell and the thing with his coach? We were dealing with Ron Artest going into the stands, we were dealing with [Tim] Donaghy, we were dealing with Gilbert Arenas. We were dealing with subsequent lockouts. We managed to keep very, very busy -- like, Holy Moses, what's up today? What's on the table? And so, for us, there was a lot to do. Me: Is $2 billion for the Clippers an outlier? DS: Oh, no, I don't think it's an outlier at all. I think it values one of the markets with the highest television revenue locally. It values the opportunity, the sponsorships, the ticket prices, the building, in a spectacular way. And well deserved. NBA.com

June 26, 2014 Updates

Former Knicks guard/forward Latrell Sprewell might be best known for his famous "I got my family to feed" quote or that he choked then-Warriors coach P.J. Carlesimo. Now, according to Rumorsandrants.com blogger Ryan Phillips, he might additionally be known for threatening fans who take cell phone photos at bars. Phillips wrote about going to a Milwaukee bar earlier this week and seeing Sprewell "talking up the ladies that were surrounding him." He snapped a shot with his phone to send to a friend, but looked up to see the ex-Knicks star telling him to "delete that [expletive]." Newark Star-Ledger

March 4, 2014 Updates

Who was the toughest player for you to guard during your career? DA: There was a couple. When I played it was tough. I was a tough guard but think about it, you had these shooting guards: Michael Jordan, Reggie Miller, Mitch Richmond, Latrell Sprewell, Allan Houston, Steve Smith, JR Rider... Just naming those guys, you knew you had a tough night every night and if you watched on TV you said 'Man, this is a great game!' Now you can't name me five apart from Kobe [Bryant], [James] Harden and maybe Joe Johnson... It was fun back then. Mario Elie, Allen Iverson was a two-guard back then... There was a bunch of talent. Now? There's nothing. HoopsHype

June 4, 2013 Updates

Much of the attention players now pay to personal style began after the NBA instituted its dress code in 2005. That code essentially forced athletes into a more polished, business-casual mold whenever they are on team or league business. It prohibits shorts and tank tops, for instance, along with chains and medallions, and forced some players to revamp their wardrobe. At the time, Britto was working with both Latrell Sprewell and Stephon Marbury. “While some of the players didn’t agree with [the new rules], I went to Ozwald Boateng and a couple of designers in New York, Ron & Ron. Latrell commissioned upward of $350,000 in suits from Ron & Ron,” Britto said. “You had guys wanting to have the personality they played with on the court reflected in their personal style.” Washington Post

March 18, 2013 Updates

(His first reaction when Sprewell choked him) More surprise, not shock. Again, I mean, there were so many people around. It was, you know, it’s a practice, and things happen at practice, but no, there was nothing that led up to it. So it was more surprise.(On of if he ever felt in danger) No. It wasn’t a situation like that. (Was he surprised that Sprewell returned to practice 20 minutes after the incident) Yes. NetsDaily

On what went wrong between him and Sprewell, and if it still bothers him today: No, to this day, I don’t (know what precipitated it), I’m not sure exactly what it was, but…something set him off, and, just, that’s the way he reacted, and the rest is history. I think people who don’t know basketball, that’s the only thing they know. Like if someone says Spre’s name or someone says my name…they say, "Oh, that, those two guys, I know that." From here (New York area), if you say my name, they’ll probably relate it to Seton Hall. If you say it on the West Coast, people relate it to Golden State or to Portland. Did the incident have any racial undertones? No, no, no. People are always gonna, you know, look at it and say, "Well, it’s a black player, it’s a white coach." No. I don’t think so. A lot of the players and coaches in the league (NBA), (who) immediately, you know, stood up and said, "Whoa, wait a minute." Let’s not bring something into this that’s not in it." That never had any legs. NetsDaily

Did he and Sprewell patch things up? No, not really. (If they ever spoke about the incident) Not really. You know, "Hello", before a game, after a game, something like that. But first time we were together again was my first game I did for NBC when I was doing broadcasting with another Fordham buddy of your(s), Mike Breen. The first game we did, Christmas Day (2001). It was Madison Square Garden and Spre came over, I think, to do a post-game radio (interview) with Clyde or something like that, but that was the first time we had been face to face since the…since the hearing. Again, it was, you know, hello, somewhat... It was cordial. (If Sprewell ever apologized) Not a problem. No. (Did he expect him to?) No, no. (If Carlesimo wants him to apologize) No. No, not needed. No, it’s over. I mean, it’s over. It was a long time ago, and (you) move on. NetsDaily

February 11, 2013 Updates
January 21, 2013 Updates

Carlesimo knows that the only way he can whack the name Sprewell from the first sentence of his biography is to do something that overshadows it. And what could be bigger than somehow holding on to this job and being the first coach to bring a professional title to Brooklyn since Walter Alston's Dodgers beat the Yankees in 1955? "It really comes down to results. People's perceptions are still colored to a lot of degree by your success," Carlesimo said. "Bill Parcells was demanding but he got results, so he's a great communicator." Newsday

This is not something that Carlesimo would ever do. Because if there is one thing that he learned from those 15 seconds on Dec. 1, 1997 -- when Sprewell, then his star player with the Golden State Warriors, responded to criticism of his passing skills ("Put a little mustard on those passes!'') by dragging Carlesimo to the practice floor and wrapping his hands around his neck -- it is this: "There are things in life you have no control over," Carlesimo said. "The way it evolved, the way it spun so big and so out of control, you just had to ride it out. It is what it is." Newsday

January 20, 2013 Updates

But before McGee gets to the "skill" part, Denver's coaches want him to get the "routine" part down. Karl, who emphasizes that he is impressed with McGee's skill set too, wants him to be more Tim Duncan and less Latrell Sprewell. "He's got to understand that lazy and crazy isn't going to make it work," Karl said. "We want solid and we want fundamental, and we want spectacular but only when it happens, not forcing the action where sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn't." Denver Post

January 13, 2013 Updates

By all accounts, Carlesimo has learned, evolved into more of an NBA coach 15 years after the Sprewell choking incident. Still, it's not easy to shake the past or a personality, especially as the only current NBA coach who made his bones in college. Even in his dealings with the media, there are signs that Carlesimo still has a college coach's mentality — like when he painstakingly mentions the contributions of every last player in postgame interviews, right down to the 12th man’s minutes in garbage time. Guys like Mike Krzyzewski, Jim Calhoun, Dean Smith and Bobby Knight never made the jump to the NBA. Rick Pitino and John Calipari failed when they tried. New York Daily News

January 1, 2013 Updates
May 1, 2012 Updates
July 27, 2011 Updates

The Wisconsin government is getting proactive about its delinquent taxpayers – it has posted the Top 100 online. And two of the top three are former NBA players. No. 1 is Milwaukee native Latrell Sprewell, who the government claims owes them $3.53 million in taxes. No. 3 is something of a surprise: Anthony Mason, the former Milwaukee Bucks’ power forward. The government says Mason owes them $2.07 million in back taxes. The Big Lead

March 21, 2011 Updates
February 7, 2011 Updates

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