HoopsHype Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf rumors

March 16, 2014 Updates

Where are they? A look at the whereabouts of members of the 1993-94 Nuggets: Coach Dan Issel: Working in the oil and gas industry for a Windsor company. Broadcaster for a couple of Nuggets games this season. Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf: Lives in suburban Atlanta. Gives private basketball training sessions. LaPhonso Ellis: College basketball analyst at ESPN. Tom Hammonds: Went into drag racing after 12-year NBA career. Briefly owned a car dealership in South Carolina. Now in the construction business in Florida. Reggie Williams: Resigned in September as coach of Archbishop Carroll High School in Washington, D.C. Rodney Rogers: Paralyzed as a result of a dirt bike accident in 2008. Lives in North Carolina. Brian Williams (Bison Dele): Presumed dead after disappearing during a sailing trip in 2002. Robert Pack: Assistant coach with the Oklahoma City Thunder. Bryant Stith: Assistant coach at Old Dominion University. Dikembe Mutombo: Humanitarian and NBA global ambassador. Denver Post

July 31, 2013 Updates

Coast basketball icon Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf is keeping busy during his retirement. The former Gulfport and NBA standout works as a basketball trainer in Atlanta and recently visited his alma mater, LSU. At his retirement tribute at the Great Southern Club by the city of Gulfport on Dec. 29, Abdul-Rauf told the Sun Herald about life after basketball. Formerly known as Chris Jackson, Abdul-Rauf attended the Hometown Heroes camp at the LSU Automotive Sportsplex. Among the former Tigers in attendance were Tyrus Thomas, Stanley Roberts, and Marcus Thornton. The father of five travelled to Washington D.C. last month. Next month, he has scheduled trips to Michigan and Texas. Writing a memoir and becoming a motivational speaker are also in his plans. Sun Herald

July 21, 2013 Updates

Suspended for one game, Abdul-Rauf compromised: He prayed with his head bowed as the anthem played. And he learned the openness America prides itself upon doesn’t always greet different beliefs or attitudes warmly. “Athletes aren’t supposed to speak out,” Abdul-Rauf said of the lesson learned. “You’re just supposed to dribble the ball up the floor, excite the crowds and not have any opinions. Politicians can say things we can’t say because that’s their place. I don’t think that’s fair.” The Advocate

Exposure abroad shaded his view in hindsight. Each culture carries its own flaws — “Some are more totalitarian or restrictive,” he said — that offered a nuanced appraisal of the controversy in the Mile High City. “It’s open, but yet it’s scary,” Abdul-Rauf said. “But when you voice things in a way that’s not subtle, you can be blackballed. You can’t say what you want up and till a certain point.” The Advocate

October 19, 2011 Updates

Or as Abdul-Rauf, who played for the Kyoto Hannaryz the past two seasons told me, "Needless to say, I'm not a big fan of David Stern or 'big business.' I believe there are exploitation issues on both sides. But no worries, the goal of the NBA is to make money so there's too much on the table for them not to have a season, and I think many will agree with that at least." Japan Times

June 6, 2011 Updates

Former LSU teammate and Kyoto Hannaryz guard Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf recalls Shaq's intense zest for life in those days and the budding star's unstoppable desire to leave his mark on and off the court. "Of course people will remember him for different things," Abdul-Rauf told The Japan Times. "But what stands out to me, especially, in his younger years is the energy and tenacity he approached the game with." Abdul-Rauf went by his given name (Chris Jackson) then and played one college season with Shaq before being selected as the No. 3 pick in the 1990 NBA Draft. "I remember when we were teammates at LSU he said that he would be the first player to have an $80 million contract," the highest-profile foreign player in bj-league history added. "He exceeded that." Japan Times

Despite O'Neal's 28,596 career points and goofy persona, wide assortment of nicknames and memorable one-liners, Abdul-Rauf remembers Shaq's unbridled determination and intense focus to succeed as being trademarks of his basketball career. "What stood out to me more than anything during those days was that he played with a chip on his shoulder," Abdul-Rauf said, analyzing the foundation period of Shaq's career. "He always had something to prove. The way we all should approach the game. "He was a mammoth of a player. But sadly I believe he also will be known for mostly being able to bulldoze his way into scoring." Japan Times

"He never really developed a low mid-range game, which I believe could have made the game easier for him throughout his career and made it less demanding on his body," Abdul-Rauf said. "And his free throws never significantly improved, which could have done the same. But despite all of those things he was still able to remarkably dominate for a long amount of time." Consider this: The 15-time All-Star averaged 20 or more points in each of his first 14 seasons in the league. A remarkable stretch in any era. "He was a likable guy by many and I hope his retirement years bring him wisdom and happiness," Abdul-Rauf concluded. Japan Times

June 4, 2011 Updates

Former LSU teammate and Kyoto Hannaryz guard Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf recalls Shaq's intense zest for life in those days and the budding star's unstoppable desire to leave his mark on and off the court. "Of course people will remember him for different things," Abdul-Rauf told The Japan Times. "But what stands out to me, especially, in his younger years is the energy and tenacity he approached the game with." Japan Times

Abdul-Rauf went by his given name (Chris Jackson) then and played one college season with Shaq before being selected as the No. 3 pick in the 1990 NBA Draft. "I remember when we were teammates at LSU he said that he would be the first player to have an $80 million contract," the highest-profile foreign player in bj-league history added. "He exceeded that." Japan Times

"What stood out to me more than anything during those days was that he played with a chip on his shoulder," Abdul-Rauf said, analyzing the foundation period of Shaq's career. "He always had something to prove. The way we all should approach the game. "He was a mammoth of a player. But sadly I believe he also will be known for mostly being able to bulldoze his way into scoring." Japan Times

"He never really developed a low mid-range game, which I believe could have made the game easier for him throughout his career and made it less demanding on his body," Abdul-Rauf said. "And his free throws never significantly improved, which could have done the same. But despite all of those things he was still able to remarkably dominate for a long amount of time." Japan Times

May 8, 2011 Updates

Will the former All-American scoring sensation from Louisiana State return to Kyoto? "It's hard to say," he said. "You never know what's in the organization's mind." If not Kyoto, will Abdul-Rauf, the No. 3 pick in the 1990 NBA Draft, entertain offers from other bj-league teams, including, possibly, the four new expansion clubs — Shinshu Brave Warriors, Chiba Jets, Yokohama B-Corsairs and Iwate Big Bulls? "Again, you never know what people are thinking," he blurted out. "You would think based on what you bring to the table that would, but I've been in situations where I've done extremely well in a country and you don't even get called back." Japan Times

April 1, 2011 Updates
January 31, 2011 Updates

Courtesy of The Japan Times’ Ed Odeven: OSAKA — Kyoto Hannaryz guard Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf participated in the 3-Point Shootout during Sunday’s All-Star festivities, providing a thrill for the enthusiastic crowd at Osaka Prefectural Gymnasium. The former NBA standout gave fans of all ages a delightful memory to talk about in years to come. They can say they saw Abdul-Rauf while he played in Japan. Even though the 41-year-old, averaging 13.9 points per game, probably should have been given a special spot on the Western Conference All-Star squad to drum up greater interest among fans and the media — heck, he was already there to begin with — he holds no grudges. SLAM

December 22, 2010 Updates
October 13, 2010 Updates

Despite beginning his professional career when George H.W. Bush was U.S. president, Abdul-Rauf's commitment to excellence hasn't changed. He admitted as much without hesitation. "Right now I feel good," said Abdul-Rauf, the Kyoto Hannaryz's 41-year-old floor leader. "I've still got passion. I'm competitive. I don't want to lose. I still feel there's room for improvement that I can make, even at 41. "I don't think you ever stop getting to the point where you can't improve, and when you do that you stop growing, you stop getting better." Japan Times

Abdul-Rauf, however, doesn't detest aging. Instead, he accepts it and maintains a youthful zest for life and basketball. "(Regarding) aging, I embrace it," he said. "Everyone's getting older, even the youngest. Every second you breathe you are getting older. And for me, I just try to take care of my body." He added: "It's a part of life. Everything has a birth and everything has a death and I am just trying to take advantage of it and utilize what God has given me to the best of my ability." Japan Times

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