HoopsHype Mark Cuban rumors

April 18, 2014 Updates

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban considers the sale price of approximately $550 million for the Milwaukee Bucks to be a bargain, suggesting the true value of NBA franchises is north of $1 billion. Longtime Bucks owner Herb Kohl announced Wednesday that he had reached an agreement to sell the team to hedge-fund billionaires Wesley Edens and Marc Lasry, a deal subject to approval by the NBA and its board of governors. "I think they got off cheap," Cuban said. "I think that was a bargain. I think it's worth a lot more. I think it's worth a lot more than that. I think someone got a bargain. You can't look backwards. You've got to look forward. You don't value teams based off what happened in the past." ESPN.com

April 4, 2014 Updates

Mark Cuban is putting his money where his mouth is and will fund a study aimed at finding out if Human Growth Hormone could help athletes at all levels recover from traumatic injuries. The Dallas Mavericks' owner said before Thursday's game against the Los Angeles Clippers that he is investing "more than the (NBA) minimum salary" to fund the two-year study. "I want to find out," Cuban said. "I just want to know what reality is. And if we can improve recovery time, obviously that's a plus for all of us. "There was never any basis in fact for not allowing it for use (while recovering from injuries). So let's find out. Let's find out what's real and not real. If it turns out to have no impact, OK. If it turns out to have a negative impact, OK. If it turns out to have a positive impact, OK. There's not an outcome they're trying to get to." Dallas Morning News

He believes athletes could spend less time recovering from injuries. "It'll be geared around one type of injury that has hundreds of thousands of examples a year," he said, electing not to discuss details of what the injury would be an which doctors and scientists are involved. "So we'll be able to do a placebo environment without hurting anybody, right? So here's the way we do it now. And here's how we do it with HGH. So hopefully it will accelerate recovery. "We have to get permission, that's why I don't want to go into all the details. We have to get FDA permission, but there's no reason not to approve it because nobody gets hurt by it. It's not long-term usage. It's X number of weeks. When you're done with it, what was the benefit." Dallas Morning News

April 1, 2014 Updates
March 27, 2014 Updates
March 26, 2014 Updates

Just 48 hours later, any creeping doubt about Dirk was crushed as he delivered one of the best all-around performances of his Hall of Fame career, carrying the Mavs to a much-needed, magnificently entertaining 128-119 overtime win Tuesday night over the Oklahoma City Thunder. "Dirk was Dirk," said Mavs owner Mark Cuban, who has seen Nowitzki respond to off nights with spectacular performances so many times. "He was fired up. That's what he does. It's no surprise. "He's done that his entire career. There's no reason to think it's going to change now. This is his time, right? This is where he gets to show everybody what he can do, and it started tonight, right when we needed it." ESPN.com

March 24, 2014 Updates

Mavericks owner Mark Cuban was asked if Nets coach Jason Kidd, who split Rookie of the Year honors in Dallas in 1995 and in 2011 helped the team win its only championship, eventually will have his jersey retired, like it is in Brooklyn. “I don’t know,” Cuban said before the game. “We’ll see. We’ll find out. I don’t pre-announce.” New York Post

Cuban also was asked about Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov, and what he thought the impact on the league could be if Prokhorov was somehow caught up in the ongoing conflict over Crimea. “I’ve thought about it, but I don’t know who he is friends with and who he’s not friends with and all that stuff, so I have no idea,” Cuban said. New York Post

March 18, 2014 Updates

Asked why he was publicly challenging Nowitzki, Cuban said: “That’s only because I did it already personally.” “Dirk always goes through a little slump during the year where he needs to remotivate. And I think we’ve seen that for a couple of games, and I think he’s going to come back stronger, particularly after three days and those naps he’s gotten through the last couple of games.” Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Since the Los Angeles Lakers are under new ownership following the death of their previous owner, Jerry Buss, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban doesn't believe the Lakers will ever be the same. "Jerry Buss was the Lakers, so I don’t know if the Lakers will ever be the Lakers,'' Cuban said prior to the Mavs' 94-89 win over Boston on Monday. "I don’t think there was a smarter owner in the history of the NBA than Jerry Buss, so that’s tough to replace. "I don’t think people realize just how good of an owner Jerry was. I looked up to him a lot. Absolutely. So I don’t know if the Lakers will ever be the Lakers.'' Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Buss died of cancer on Feb. 18, 2013 at the age of 80 after owning the Lakers since 1979. So why was Buss such a great owner? "He just understood fans, entertainment, players, how to balance all of it together, how to deal with the NBA, when to listen to (ex-NBA commissioner) David (Stern) and when to ignore him and when to tell him what to do,'' Cuban said. "He had that breath of skills that every time I spoke to him -- usually I’m used to doing to the talking, just force of habit. "But he’s one of the few people that when we sat down I did all the listening. So I don’t think there’s any question he’s by far the best owner in the history of the NBA. No exception.'' Fort Worth Star-Telegram

March 17, 2014 Updates

Mavericks owner Mark Cuban made a point to publicly challenge superstar Dirk Nowitzki to play with more effort and energy defensively. "I think we've got to get a little bit more out of Dirk defensively," Cuban said before Monday night's game against the Boston Celtics, responding to a general question about the Mavs' recent performance. "I think [the Mavs need] a little bit more energy out of Dirk, particularly when things don't start well." ESPN.com

Mark Cuban on Adam Silver denying tanking exists in the NBA: "No one thinks it doesn't exist, it's just a question of whether or not it's effective. And when so many teams tank in one conference, it's not effective." Cuban went on to explain that in the Eastern Conference, tanking actually becomes difficult on account of there being so many teams all trying to tank at once. With so many teams planning on tanking from the beginning, plus teams who weren't trying to winding up there (Milwaukee), it creates a competitive tanking environment, basically. CBSSports.com

March 15, 2014 Updates

Procopio is in his first full season as director of player development for the Mavericks. Team owner Mark Cuban is paying Procopio to take castoffs like McConnell and second-round pick Ricky Ledo—players who, relatively speaking, cost the team pennies—and turn them into contributors, players who can move from the end of the bench to coach Rick Carlisle’s rotation. If Procopio turns a single pupil into a reliable player, or even merely good enough to serve as trade bait, he will give the Mavs a great return on their investment. After all, people like Cuban become billionaires and build championship teams not only because they land players like star power forward Dirk Nowitzki, but also because they find ways to maximize their assets—even those at the bottom of the roster. Need proof that Cuban takes this seriously? Consider that he is personally responsible for hiring Procopio, the trail to his door blazed by Cuban asking, “Who’s the best guy not in the NBA that I need in my organization?” “He is a great asset,” Cuban says. “He is the best player development coach in the NBA.” Suffolk Magazine

March 8, 2014 Updates

The NBA Draft has been two rounds since Mark Cuban became the Dallas Mavericks’ owner on Jan. 4, 2000. But he would like to see that expanded. “I’d like to see four rounds so you can draft guys overseas, get more guys drafted that are your property so you can try to develop them,” Cuban said before Friday’s game against Portland. “Because once they get into the ‘I’m a free agent, I wasn’t drafted grind,’ ... you’ve got to realize that toward the bottom of the second round there are teams that pick for financial reasons, and that takes advantage of guys that might have otherwise been picked. “Rather than me making a call, ‘Hey, so-and-so, you’re the 61st pick in the NBA draft,’ It would be better to have the draft [expanded], but again, it’s not my say.” Fort Worth Star-Telegram

March 1, 2014 Updates

Either way, Cuban said, the current system is too flawed and not in the best interest of 19-year-olds who attempt to jump to the NBA. "Because the NCAA rules are so hypocritical, there's absolutely no reason for a kid to go (to college for one year)," Cuban said. "Because he's not going to class, right? He's actually not able to take advantage of all the fun because the first semester he's there, he starts playing basketball. "So if the goal is just to graduate to the NBA or be an NBA player, go to the D-League. And hopefully at some point we'll have some kind of a secondary draft like baseball, where you can draft a kid starting in the third round and let him play in the D-League." Dallas Morning News

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