HoopsHype Media rumors

November 19, 2014 Updates
November 18, 2014 Updates

ESPN Films today announced a new 30 for 30 film that will debut in 2015 as part of the award-winning and critically-acclaimed documentary series. “I Hate Christian Laettner,” directed by Rory Karpf (“The Book of Manning,” “Tim Richmond: To The Limit”), will premiere Sunday, March 15, at 9 p.m. ET after Bracketology on ESPN. Through interviews with former teammates and rivals as well as Laettner himself, the film explores why the polarizing basketball player was—and still is—so disliked. ESPN.com

November 17, 2014 Updates

Memphis Grizzlies general manager Chris Wallace told Yahoo Sports he expects the NBA will validate his franchise's protested victory over the Sacramento Kings, "regardless of the media campaign being waged." In the aftermath of the Grizzlies' 111-110 victory on Thursday night, Sacramento filed a protest with the league office insisting Courtney Lee's buzzer-beating shot should've been disallowed. The Kings maintain an inbounds pass to Lee had been tipped and the game clock should've run out before Lee could've caught and scored the basket. Yahoo! Sports

When specifically asked if had seen or heard Smith's comments, Carter-Williams said, "I came across it because people told me about them. I have seen things on Twitter, but again, none of that fazes me too much." The reason Carter-Williams wrote the article in the first place was to express himself in a way he doesn't feel he can when he answers questions from the media. "I just felt I had something that I needed to say," Carter-Williams said. "I can't really say it too much in the media. It is hard for me to form my words when I don't have the time to think about it and really express myself." CSNPhilly.com

Mike Wise, a Washington Post sports columnist for more than a decade, is leaving the paper to help ESPN launch a new site focused on the intersection of sports, culture and race. The Post announced the news in a staff memo Monday evening. The new site — the brainchild of Jason Whitlock, who will be its editor-in-chief — has been commonly referred to as “Black Grantland” in recent months. Wise, it’s worth noting, is bald, middle-aged, and also white. Washington Post

Michael Carter-Williams: The media creates this narrative and repeats it over and over. That’s how Stephen A. Smith ends up in our locker room with a big smile on his face. I’m not picking on him. I know he’s playing a character. He knows he’s playing a character. But what happens when we break the streak by going out and beating Detroit that night? Now it’s another story. After the game, a lot of the reporters didn’t even stick around. The ones that did weren’t prepared. They didn’t ask us about the specifics of the game. They made up questions on the spot, like, “Uh, hey, you guys won … so how do you feel?” The Players' Tribune

November 14, 2014 Updates
November 13, 2014 Updates

Q: How are you enjoying TV work compared to coaching? Avery Johnson: At the moment, I love what I’m doing coaching millions of people with the opportunity to work with ESPN on all of our shows. So it’s great. I had a chance to cover the University of Kentucky’s open practice, I’m calling a high school game on Dec. 8, the high school my son attended. He’s now at Texas A&M. I love the opportunity to coach the audience and entertain. Obviously, if a coaching opportunity presents itself then I’ll address that at that time. But I love what I’m doing right now, and that’s what I see myself doing as time wears on. San Antonio Express-News

Michael Carter-Williams: You can question my shooting. You can question my ceiling. Just don’t question if I’m giving my all every single night. Don’t talk to me about tanking. The media creates this narrative and repeats it over and over. That’s how Stephen A. Smith ends up in our locker room with a big smile on his face. I’m not picking on him. I know he’s playing a character. He knows he’s playing a character. But what happens when we break the streak by going out and beating Detroit that night? Now it’s another story. After the game, a lot of the reporters didn’t even stick around. The ones that did weren’t prepared. They didn’t ask us about the specifics of the game. They made up questions on the spot, like, “Uh, hey, you guys won … so how do you feel?” The Players' Tribune

Michael Carter-Williams: In the middle of the playoff race, a race we were decidedly not in, it seemed like the entire media spotlight was on us. And trust me, I get it. We had lost 26 games in a row. Of course, our roster had lost a combined 200-plus games to injury and we had used more than 20 different players in the lineup since opening night. That didn’t seem to be a part of the conversation. All anybody was talking about was “tanking.” We knew it was going to be a circus when ESPN flew in Stephen A. Smith to Philadelphia for the 27th game against Detroit. In the locker room before shootaround, we got swarmed by reporters. You could barely move around the room. Somebody actually asked, “So how does it feel to be a part of the most losing team in NBA history?” Which was really funny because we hadn’t even played the game yet. Everybody just expected us to lose and set the record. The Players' Tribune

Michael Carter-Williams: Here’s the thing: I can understand why the media seized onto the story. My problem is that it was missing a lot of context. We didn’t even have the worst record in the league at the time, but the average person watching on TV probably didn’t know that. The media spin was that we were tanking the season so we could get the number one draft pick. Now, let’s break that down for a minute. First of all, there’s a lottery system. As players, we all know the math. The last place team only has a 25 percent chance of winning the lottery. Grown men are going to go out and purposely mail it in for a one-in-four shot at drafting somebody who might someday take their job? Nope. The Players' Tribune

Michael Carter-Williams: And then there’s the hype surrounding the No. 1 pick. Even before the season started, TankingForWiggins.com was a real thing. Once the narrative picks up, it’s over. We wished we could come out and say how ridiculous it was for people to think the players were tanking when there were guys on the team playing for their livelihood, but that only would’ve made it worse. Nobody took the losses harder than we did. We deserved plenty of criticism, but we all put in too much work to be treated like a joke. The Players' Tribune

The other was almost three years ago, Trey Burke texted me that he was leaving after his freshman year. Cleaned out his dorm room or apartment, then went back home, and both Beilein and his dad convinced him to come back for his sophomore year. It was the best decision that he made, because he ended up being a lottery pick and having a player of the year season as a sophomore. But he’s the one that told me he was leaving, and I wrote it “according to sources,” and then he changed his mind, and so Michigan fans were mad, and rightfully so. “Hey, Goodman was wrong, he said Trey Burke was leaving after his freshman year and he didn’t.” I get it. The Big Lead

The Lakers still made off with $122 million from their TV deal, the largest haul from a local TV rights holder in any U.S. pro sports league. And while their agreement with Time Warner provides them with three percent annual increases, how much more they make above that hinges on ratings. “Kobe brings eyes to the TV,’’ said the NBA team executive. “No, he’s not the same player he once was, but people are always going to watch Kobe Bryant.’’ Forbes.com

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