HoopsHype Michael Jordan rumors

October 16, 2014 Updates

Jordan also didn't see the point in shortening games by four minutes. He said the league informed its clubs of its intention to play a 44-minute game but that it was not presented as something the league is seriously considering instituting in the regular season. "I would never shorten the game by four minutes,'' Jordan said, "unless guys were having physical issues. It's not like football,'' he said. "We don't really have to worry about concussions and some of the physical damage that football players deal with after they retire. I can understand football players wanting to play fewer games from a physical standpoint. But basketball's not the same. I'm not diminishing the fact that we go through a grueling season. But I wouldn't want to shorten the game or play 15-20 fewer games.'' ESPN.com

October 14, 2014 Updates

After Stephenson and his agent, Alberto Ebanks, had failed to reach a deal with the Pacers, they met in Las Vegas with Jordan, Cho, Hornets vice chairman Curtis Polk, Clifford, Ewing and assistant general manager Chad Buchanan. Jordan wasn't the only member of his family at the meeting, either, as his brother and Hornets director of player personnel Larry Jordan was there, as was Hornets executive vice president of operations Ronnie Jordan. As Clifford remembers it, MJ and Ewing — the face of the Knicks during Stephenson's childhood — had everything to do with the three-year, $27million deal getting done a day later. "The biggest part about the meeting was our owner," Clifford says. "He's a fan of Lance. He loves his competitiveness, and he talked to him candidly about why we think he's such a good fit for our franchise and about things ... that (Stephenson) could control to get better. I thought that set the tone for the whole meeting." USA Today Sports

Clifford, who signed a three-year, $6million deal with a team option for 2015-16, raves about his experience with Jordan. "From the time I've been here, I think he's been motivated and aggressive to make our team better," Clifford tells USA TODAY Sports. "And then aside from that ... he's valuable to me because he watches every game. ... He gives me good feedback on what he sees, and he's not afraid to tell me when there are things that he thinks we could be doing better or I could be doing better. But he's also extremely supportive." USA Today Sports

October 12, 2014 Updates
October 9, 2014 Updates

Julius Erving, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Michael Jordan and David Stern are all names synonymous with the NBA’s rise in popularity during the 1980s. But there were, of course, key personnel in the league office building the foundation for success in the decades to come. Terry Lyons was one of those individuals. In fact, he filled some of the most important roles behind the scenes. ““Terry Lyons’ enormous contributions to our media relations efforts for almost three decades have been a key driver to our growth, domestically and internationally,” Stern was quoted as saying in a statement posted on Lyons’ website. ” He has grown up with the NBA and the NBA has grown up with him. Terry has traveled the world on behalf of the NBA and Team USA, spreading the basketball gospel. He has worked arduously to enhance international media coverage of our teams and our games and he has made the NBA office a welcoming center for the global basketball community and international media. We will miss him greatly, and wish him continued professional success and much personal happiness.” Ed Odeven Reporting

October 7, 2014 Updates

Based on one team's estimates, James could earn $28 million as a free agent in 2016—a 36 percent leap from his current salary. Assuming a four-year deal with maximum raises, James would earn an NBA-record $34 million in the final season, the most any player has earned in the max-contract era. Michael Jordan made a record $33 million in 1997-98, the season before the NBA capped individual salaries. Bleacher Report

September 8, 2014 Updates

The greatest friendship since Rick Blaine and Capt. Renault is on the rocks. So says Charles Barkley. In a Yahoo interview, Charles Barkley divulges that critical comments he’s made about the former Charlotte Bobcats as a TNT analyst have rankled MJ, that team’s owner. “I think that Michael was upset by some of the things I said about the Bobcats – which, number one, they were true,” Barkley said. “I told you earlier, I’m going to be honest, and I’m going to be fair. The Bobcats -– first of all, he’s doing a much better job. But a couple years ago, I want to say three years ago, when they were vying for the worst record in NBA history, Michael had not done a good job. He took it personally.” Washington Post

September 5, 2014 Updates

A man who was a ball boy for the 1984 USA men's basketball team at the Olympics is giving up his prize possession: Michael Jordan's sneakers. The man, who prefers to remain anonymous, consigned the shoes he says Jordan wore in the gold medal-winning game over Spain and then on the medal stand to Grey Flannel Auctions for its auction in mid-October. The shoes are white Converse, the brand Jordan wore at North Carolina, thanks to a $10,000 a year deal that was given to his coach, Dean Smith, at the time. ESPN.com

September 4, 2014 Updates

Charles Barkley, in an interview with Graham Bensinger: I think that Michael was upset by some of the things I said about the Bobcats – which, number one, they were true. I told you earlier, I’m going to be honest, and I’m going to be fair. The Bobcats – first of all, he’s doing a much better job. But a couple years ago, I want to say three years ago, when they were vying for the worst record in NBA history, Michael had not done a good job. He took it personally. NBCSports.com

September 3, 2014 Updates

Roland Lazenby: If you look, [Jordan] did amazing things for the Wizards. They cleared up all the cap space. The thing that amazed all of Jordan’s close associates and observers — the great Johnny Bach being one of them, who was an assistant coach in Washington at the time — they all knew that when Jordan decided to play again, it was amazing to them, because it was very obvious the Wizards were not a team that could win. Jordan knew he could not win, and in his life he loathed any such situation. But he was trying to find some way to relate. He had obviously infuriated the late Abe Pollin, the longtime owner of the Bullets, who then became the Wizards. Abe Pollin, this huge figure in the D.C. community, a philanthropist and a guy that loved basketball. But let’s face it, the Wizards were awful. And Abe Pollin was such a good guy, he never fired anyone. He was so loyal he would just tolerate [pauses] incompetence. The Wizards were a team that, their main marketing campaign was, ‘Well, our team’s not very good, but here are all the other teams coming to town that are going to be fun to watch.’ Washington Post

When Roland Lazenby — author of the new biography “Michael Jordan: The Life” and numerous other sports books — came to the Varsity Letters sports reading series in New York this summer, one intrepid Wizards fan hazarded a question. Lazenby had just wrapped up what largely came across as a defense of Michael Jordan, the person, who — since the end of the era of “Space Jam,” the McDonald’s commercial with Larry Bird, and “It’s Gotta Be the Shoes” — has seen less than favorable coverage. “What do you make of Jordan’s time with the Wizards?” the Wizards fan asked, momentarily giving the underground bar where Lazenby spoke the same sort of hushed anticipation as a Thanksgiving dinner where someone mentions Uncle Larry’s affair, or the Cheever Letters, or whatever family secret no one’s brave enough to mention without being more than a few Scotches or eggnogs in. Washington Post

Colin Wilhelm: You start out your book examining Michael Jordan’s family, starting out with his great-grandfather Dawson. Why did you choose to do this? Roland Lazenby: I wanted to understand the family and the culture that Michael Jordan came from. In so many ways Nike did this breakthrough level of marketing with Michael Jordan, obviously, but the process of that sort of divorced him from his cultural background….To really understand him is to reconnect him with that cultural background. Dawson Jordan — who was 5 feet 5 and crippled, his great-grandfather, who was born in 1891 and died when Michael was 14 — he was the patriarch of the family. He lorded over the Jordan family….So I wanted to bring all of that together to really explain the family culture of Michael Jordan. Washington Post

August 23, 2014 Updates

So Kobe found his drive in being different, in being alone. That’s why he studies the iconoclasts. It’s why he’s close to so few people in the NBA. And it’s why, while some like Phil Jackson think he will prosper upon leaving the game, others aren’t so sure. “You know how it’s been hard for Jordan in retirement?” says one GM. “It’s going to be way worse to be Kobe. He has fewer friends and the same competitive drive. At least MJ likes to golf and play cards.” Sports Illustrated

August 22, 2014 Updates

Yesterday we saw Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan take the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. AS part of MJ’s acceptance, he issued a challenge to his Dream Team teammates. As we noted on the Jordan post, his Dream team teammate Larry Bird was a step ahead of him. But today, MJ’s Dream Team teammate Patrick Ewing, an assistant coach for the Hornets, stepped up to the plate and took the ice bucket challenge… NBA.com

August 6, 2014 Updates

Just yesterday we checked in with Michael Jordan at his eponymous basketball camp, where we saw that he still has a sweet shooting stroke. Well, today video has emerged of MJ at that same camp, teaming up with a camper and playing a two-on-two game of hot shot against another camper and his partner, gulp, NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard. It really gets going around the four-minute mark… NBA.com

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