HoopsHype NBPA rumors

October 29, 2014 Updates
October 23, 2014 Updates

Players' union executive director Michele Roberts told the AP that she has had substantive dialogue with the league about addressing domestic violence and educating players and their families about it. But as a former public defender, she is also an advocate for due process. "I don't, quite frankly, know what the rush is," Roberts said. "Many of the teams are saying, until this is resolved I'd like at least for you to not play. I'm not fond of that." Boston Herald

October 20, 2014 Updates

But she also was brought in to try and clean up the mess and dysfunction left behind in the wake of the players forcing Billy Hunter out in 2013 “I do agree that, on one level, I was hired to be a fighter,” Roberts told The Post in a lengthy and candid interview inside the union’s Harlem headquarters last week. “Any executive director needs to understand that’s a part of what he or she is going to be expected to do. “But I think what is equally important, for me, is to repair what has been a foundation that has been subjected to some injury by, unfortunately, my predecessor. What we don’t have, and what we will have, is a management structure that is both able to interact with our counterparties with the league and elsewhere, but a structure that allows the players to do unequivocally what they want to do, and that’s run their own union…. They didn’t hire me, and they were not interested in hiring, someone to run things for them, to simply let them know what’s going on.” New York Post

The N.B.A. players union has hired Gary Kohlman as its new general counsel, according to a person who was briefed on the negotiations but was not authorized to speak publicly. The union’s executive committee approved the nomination, and a formal announcement was expected as early as Monday. Kohlman, 68, was the lead trial lawyer at the Washington firm Bredhoff & Kaiser, where he represented a number of unions, including the Service Employees International Union and the United Steelworkers. New York Times

October 19, 2014 Updates

“Things change so rapidly in business that you can’t predict two years from now,” Cuban said. “I think I read it [the salary cap] could go to $91 [million], but I haven’t done the math.” Asked what he thinks about the players wanting to do away with maximum contracts, opening the door for monster deals for monster players, Cuban said: “If you give up guarantees, it’s a trade-off. It was discussed during the lockout [in 2011] among owners but never got anywhere. So it was just one of those trial balloons. I’m not suggesting it. All I’m saying is that was something we discussed before, and max contracts are always a big question, guarantees are always a big question. But we have two years before that’s even an issue.” Dallas Morning News

October 16, 2014 Updates
October 14, 2014 Updates

According to various reports, the players want a higher percentage of BRI in light of this new television deal, and the owners want to lower that percentage even further. The players had a 57 percent share of BRI in the previous CBA. This disagreement seems to point to a potentially cataclysmic conflict. "The owners are going to be in for a long winter," one source close to the union said about the possibility of players giving back any percentage of revenue. "It's inconceivable to me given the give ups in the last deal that owners will seriously come back and want to have more. It ain't happening." VICE

October 9, 2014 Updates

The other part is while smoothing, by way of a lump sum payment is a neat and clean way for the NBA to deal with a new influx of cash with a huge jump in the salary cap, how the Player’s Association would distribute those funds becomes unclear as well. They could simply issue an equal installment to every player, or devise some sort of formula to issue monies based on some criteria like percentage of cap. One league source suggested that a lump sum payment could be, at least in part, held back as a war chest of sorts for what’s expected to be a labor fight in 2017, when the players are expected to opt out of the current CBA. Basketball Insiders

With new leadership in place on the player’s side it will be interesting to see if new Executive Director Michele Roberts uses this opportunity to buy some good will among the rank and file, by way of a nice lump sum check to every player, rather than fighting a smoothing plan and letting the 140 or so players headed to free agency absorb the gains from the new TV deal. This is issue is far from decided, so there will clearly be more to know in the coming weeks, however team sources say they are not planning for a massive cap increase in 2016, so that’s at least one indicator that something on the smoothing front could be agreed to. Basketball Insiders

October 7, 2014 Updates

Based on one team's estimates, James could earn $28 million as a free agent in 2016—a 36 percent leap from his current salary. Assuming a four-year deal with maximum raises, James would earn an NBA-record $34 million in the final season, the most any player has earned in the max-contract era. Michael Jordan made a record $33 million in 1997-98, the season before the NBA capped individual salaries. Bleacher Report

Although the players' share of revenue has gone down, their actual earnings are about to spike dramatically, thanks to the new infusion of TV dollars. The average salary, currently $5.5 million, could leap to about $7.3 million in 2016, according to team executives. Bleacher Report

And the riches could be spread far and wide, as the salary cap surges from $63 million this season to a projected $84.4 million in 2016-17. Every team in the league could be under the cap in two years (even the spend-happy Nets), creating a cash surplus that—under the NBA's system—must be spent on players. Bleacher Report

The current collective bargaining agreement actually runs through 2021, but either side can opt out in 2017, and the players are almost certain to do so, for obvious reasons: 1. The union made massive financial concessions in 2011, giving up $300 million a year. 2. The new TV deal, as James indicated, removes the NBA's rationale for those concessions. "I think it's a pretty good bet, based on both of those things," that the players will opt out, Michele Roberts, the union's new executive director, told Bleacher Report in a recent interview. She added, "It would be silly for anyone to assume" otherwise. Bleacher Report

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