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March 11, 2015 Updates

Larry Coon: Most likely reason union didn't want smoothing -- it takes years to implement, and they're going to opt-out in 2017. This way they get big cap jump in 2016, then (assuming season not cancelled) a new CBA in 2017 that deals with the money in a way they'd consider to be fair. Twitter

Larry Coon: You know who gets screwed the most from this? Rank and file players who don't have many years left in the league. Under smoothing they would have gotten a big shortfall check in 2016-17. But this way, all the 2016 money goes to 2016 free agents. Playes need to be in the league past 2017 to reap the benefits. Players whose last years in the league are 2016-17 or 2017-18 will miss out. This is why I'm surprised that the union vote was unanimous to reject smoothing. I doubt if was a truly informed decision on the part of 450+ players. Twitter

Larry Coon: One more bad factor in this -- it incentivizes signing short contracts, so less security of total money locked-in. Players have to choose between job security of a longer deal and greater upside if they sign a shorter deal now and a bigger deal in 2016. Twitter

March 10, 2015 Updates

Tribune: You have proposed a harder salary cap. Why is that necessary? Silver: We proposed it during the last CBA round because we think it creates more parity around the league. No doubt, there’s a correlation between payroll and success on the floor. For us, the ultimate goal is to have a 30-team league in which teams win championships based on management and not on the the size of their market or the owner’s willingness to lose money in order to win. We look at the NFL system with a hard cap; they have the best parity in all sports, and an “Any Given Sunday” notion. Granted, we’re a very different sport, because a superstar player who plays virtually the entire game can have a far greater impact on a game than in the NFL. But with a harder cap, we can create more parity throughout the league. We’ve done that to an extent with provisions put into place in the new CBA, with a higher luxury tax and additional limitations on which players you can sign. Portland Tribune

March 9, 2015 Updates

The new TV deal is going to flood teams with cash, but that doesn’t happen day one – many teams are not going to have the cash flow to meet a $75-$80 million salary without financing some of that. What they need is for tat first TV check to come through and then they have the cash to pay out bigger salaries. That’s why the NBA is pushing for smoothing to make it more seamless to the owners. So I spoke with someone involved in the last labor deal just to get a perspective is using this as leverage for a deal was possible and the stance the league takes in reaching a deal and how the players as a group approached the last two deals simply makes it unrealistic to think that just because NBPA leadership is changing that they will somehow gain the advantage in negotiation – being tougher simply means you lose more. I think there are things the NBA owners could concede to, given where things are financially, but to tip over the table as a negotiation stance seems foolish, but plays back to the concept of not knowing how much you don’t know. Basketball Insiders

March 6, 2015 Updates
March 3, 2015 Updates

The quote from the ESPNW article drew swift criticism. What was your intent when you said it? Michele Roberts: We were having a discussion about Kevin Durant and his whole thing, his dismay, and I began -- I am confident -- by saying I know, as he later said, he was not having a great moment at the time. But no one suggested, and I don't even think he was suggesting, that there not be access, or that the players should not be made available to answer questions to the media because, frankly, I'm less concerned about reporters being able to get questions answered, but this is for the fans. Those are the questions, presumably, that the fans want to have posed. And in my view the purpose of media in this country, both generally and within the context of sports, the rest of us need to have someone available to ask the questions of politicians, of athletes, of movie stars that we can't otherwise ask. I know I said that, made that quite clear, because I've been an advocate of the First Amendment since I could speak. SB Nation

Michele Roberts: But then I began to notice that there was a small group of reporters, and I now think that they're probably more bloggers than anything else, that would never ask questions. And they would typically walk into a locker room and they would just sort of be standing there, even at the point when media availability ended, I would never see them ask a question. Now, I know that there the marquees are sometimes not in the room and I get that there are sometimes people waiting for the so-called marquee players to come. But I wasn't referring to that. I was referring to those guys who frankly are just there appearing to be listening, but not asking questions. SB Nation

I can't speak to the specific situation that you were in, but I do feel like I need to advocate for the younger media members and bloggers. A lot of times they're told to observe, especially when they're not used to being in a locker room or a scrum situation. I've seen situations where a young blogger or intern is just trying to get their lay of the land. Michele Roberts: The people that are in my mind right now are not young. I'm there, and I'm old enough to see people. And I'm seeing these guys -- and I'm talking about New York locker rooms typically because that's where I am most of the time except when I travel -- but the guys that are coming to my mind now are not young. They may not be as old as I am, but they're not young. SB Nation

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