HoopsHype NBPA rumors

October 6, 2014 Updates

Ohm Youngmisuk: Carmelo congratulates Adam Silver on new TV deal. Says he never thought about re-signing to a 2-year deal with potential new TV deal Twitter @NotoriousOHM

As NBA teams use increased technology to track players on and off the court, the players' union wants to ensure that privacy is still being protected. Franchises have been scrutinizing player movement on the court since the 2012-13 season, but data collection has also recently extended beyond the hardwood. Various teams have begun experimenting with sleep trackers, off-court movement monitors and fluid tests -- including blood and sweat -- in order in order improve player health and performance. ESPN.com

NBPA 

These developments have happened so quickly and quietly, however, that the National Basketball Players Association was not aware of these widespread biometric advances, and had not established a position on the issue, until ESPN The Magazine approached the union for comment in August. "If the league and teams want to discuss potentially invasive testing procedures that relate to performance, they're free to start that dialogue and we'll be glad to weigh the benefits against the risks," longtime NBPA counsel Ron Klempner said. "Obviously, we'd have serious privacy and other fairness concerns on behalf of the players. We've barely left the starting line on these issues." ESPN.com

September 27, 2014 Updates
September 26, 2014 Updates
September 24, 2014 Updates

Michele Roberts will be paid a base salary of $1.2 million as director of the union that represents National Basketball Association players, less than half of what her fired predecessor was earning. Roberts, 58, the first woman to lead a major U.S. sports union, said in a telephone interview that her base salary can be bolstered by annual $600,000 bonuses over the life of the four-year contract. The bonus is at the discretion of the union’s nine-member executive committee, which is led by President Chris Paul of the Los Angeles Clippers. Bloomberg

“My first goal is to establish credibility with the players. I trust that they have some concerns about whether or not they are in for another round of bad management,” Roberts told the Daily News on Monday, her first official day on the job. “And the answer to that is, ‘Absolutely not.’ But the only way I can make that case is to meet them, make some promises and have them hold me accountable to those promises. My first goal is to go out and meet them so I’ll be doing a lot of traveling. “I’m sure there are people thinking, ‘Ahh, another politician-like person coming in trying to sell us a bunch of bull.’ And that’s my job to win them over, to tell them, ‘No, this time it will be different or fire me. I want you to if I even dare replicate my predecessor.’” New York Daily News

September 22, 2014 Updates

Former executive director Charles Grantham said it will be significant responsibility for the neophyte executive director. “The biggest challenge for [the NBPA] is the [potential] lockout,” said Grantham, who teaches at New York University and Seton Hall. “The question is for the last three times, there has been probably 15 or 16 givebacks or concessions that [the players’ union] made over this period of time that puts them at the bottom. “It starts with preparation and being prepared for this thing [a lockout] that we all know is coming. After three successive collective bargaining negotiations from management side, all that began with the [1998] lockout and put the union in a concessionary bargaining position. The day is gone when you used to be able to tell players to save money. You can’t do that.” Boston Globe

September 21, 2014 Updates

Former executive director Charles Grantham said it will be significant responsibility for the neophyte executive director. “The biggest challenge for [the NBPA] is the [potential] lockout,” said Grantham, who teaches at New York University and Seton Hall. “The question is for the last three times, there has been probably 15 or 16 givebacks or concessions that [the players’ union] made over this period of time that puts them at the bottom. “It starts with preparation and being prepared for this thing [a lockout] that we all know is coming. After three successive collective bargaining negotiations from management side, all that began with the [1998] lockout and put the union in a concessionary bargaining position. The day is gone when you used to be able to tell players to save money. You can’t do that.” Boston Globe

“One, the first challenge is again to get back to the concept that it’s got to be an institutional response — how does the institution create the protection for the players?” he said. “[Roberts’s] challenge is to rally the troops and unite the troops and get them into a position of understanding the business side of the sport, which is always the most difficult part because our players are very active playing in their careers and if they’re asked to do two things at once . . . [and] we expect that they know everything else about the collective bargaining agreement. “That road to having a four- or five-year NBA experience is a difficult one and we keep forgetting it’s in a fish bowl and they’re 19, 20, 21 [years old]. They are growing in front of our eyes but we expect them to make mature decisions. That’s the challenge, not to follow them but to lead them.” Boston Globe

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