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February 23, 2015 Updates

It's not likely that owners would go after the max-salaried guys. But the game's stars have long been frustrated by what they believe is an artificial limitation placed on what they can earn, especially compared to players in baseball that make tens of millions more. That will be one of the issues about which James has to get up to speed. "It takes about a year," Jones said. "You really have to go to the summer meetings to get a full grasp of what the union is about, and then have some time to look at the CBA, look at the issues, look at the areas for improvement and look beyond those things. Because as we see with this new CBA, every deadline, every two months something unfolds that is an unintended consequence of this deal being struck." NBA.com

February 18, 2015 Updates

Following the 2010-11 season, owners were able to negotiate a CBA that was more in their favor, cutting the players' share of basketball-related income from 57 percent to roughly 50, costing them millions in annual salaries. That contract runs through 2021, but with the economic boost — $2.6 billion per year — coming from the TV contract, players will fight harder for a larger portion of the pie. "We want to negotiate a little better than we did last time," said Hawks sharpshooter Kyle Korver. "We're going to be well-equipped to stand toe-to-toe with the NBA and negotiate a fair deal. That's what we want — just a fair deal." USA Today Sports

Silver is concerned with keeping the game relevant amid stiff competition from other sports. It's vital to stay affordable and attractive to an aging population as well as the next generation of hoop fans. It's entertainment, after all, and Silver wants to keep the NBA in the center of the spotlight. "I realize we have to earn the fans' support every day," he told The AP. "Over the course of my business career I've seen a lot of great businesses seemingly disappear. We don't take anything for granted and we realize that especially when it comes to the changing world of television that we have to focus on what's happening on tablets and smartphones and how young people are consuming media." USA Today Sports

February 15, 2015 Updates

The Roberts-Silver relationship has, of course, just gotten underway — Roberts was only hired over the summer, and Silver took over for Stern a year ago. They’ll keep talking about some mechanism that can reduce the shock to the NBA’s system as the new money comes in, but it’s difficult to see a compromise there. “I haven’t had a chance to negotiate with the unions directly since they had that meeting (Friday) night,” Silver said. “My sense is there will be additional discussions, but ultimately that is what our system is under the current collective bargaining agreement. It’s like a lot of things in business and in sports, you deal with the situation as it is presented to you. I don’t want to act like it is a terrible problem to have — we’re thrilled that based on the interest in the NBA, we are able to command these big increases in the television market.” Sporting News

What if the Knicks suddenly had the opportunity to sign up two max-contract players? Or if the Lakers could sign three? Or if the already-stocked Bulls could add another All-Star? Where does that leave, say, Milwaukee or Minnesota or New Orleans? “It’s what our system is,” Silver said on Saturday. “The players receive, on a sliding scale, it ranges from 49 to 51 percent, and because of the revenue targets we hit, the players will receive 51 percent of the new television money. At the time we were negotiating the deal, we were not projecting that our television increases would be as large as they are. … (Smoothing) is something we presented to the union, ultimately it is up to them to decide what is in the interest of the players association. I have a feeling there will be additional discussions.” Sporting News

February 14, 2015 Updates

The key meeting took place late last year in Cleveland. Roberts met with James, introduced him to her growing executive staff and explained her vision of the union. Also in the meeting were some of James' closest NBA friends: James Jones, a NBPA executive committee member who played with James in Miami and now is his teammate in Cleveland, and Roger Mason Jr., who was an executive committee member and is deputy executive director of player relations for the NBPA. Roberts left that meeting with the understanding that James is a union person, not just in the sense of the NBPA but for unions in general. James has a comfort level with Roberts and a long friendship with NBPA president Chris Paul, who urged James to take a prominent role with union. That will be important after James was elected first vice president of the NBPA in New York on Friday. USA Today Sports

How important is James' presence on the union's executive committee? One player told USA TODAY Sports that James is the most influential players voice since Michael Jordan, and now that prominent voice will have a seat at the union's table. The player requested anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about union matters. "It means a lot. 'Bron is the face of our league. He's opinion matters," Paul said. "Obviously me and him talk all day every day. It's just an opportunity for other people to see how he feels about things." USA Today Sports

The National Basketball Players Association on Saturday rejected the NBA's proposal for "smoothing in" billions of dollars from the new TV/media deal into the salary cap. NBPA executive director Michele Roberts said the union hired two forensic economic teams to evaluate the league's proposal and both economic teams recommended the union not accept the league's proposal. USA Today Sports

Regardless, players will still get 51% of basketball-related income (BRI). Under the CBA, when player salaries don't reach 51%, the league cuts a check to players for the difference. The union is opposed to artificially suppressing the salary cap, but it appeared Roberts is willing to read other proposals. USA Today Sports

February 13, 2015 Updates

Ken Berger: Roberts says the board of player reps voted unanimously to reject the NBA's "smoothing" proposal for increase in TV revenues. The NBA had proposed that the dramatic increase in TV revenues coming in 2016 be gradually incorporated into the salary cap. Twitter @KBergCBS

Tim Bontemps: Roberts says there could be a counter proposal, but the union hasn't had a chance to decide whether it will produce one. Roberts says that advancing the new TV money in ahead of time is not something that has been proposed by the league at this time. Twitter @TimBontemps

LeBron James was elected first vice president of the National Basketball Players Association on Friday, moving him into the union's second-most powerful leadership position beneath president Chris Paul, league sources told Yahoo Sports. Yahoo! Sports

The NBPA is working to reshape itself under new executive director Michele Roberts. For years, there's been a push on the players' side to get the league's most prominent players into senior leadership positions. James' elevation to First Vice President is the most significant step yet in that process. The NBA and NBPA could be headed toward another labor showdown in 2017, when each side has the opportunity to opt out of the current collective bargaining agreement and ignite a possible work stoppage. Yahoo! Sports

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