HoopsHype Owners rumors

January 23, 2014 Updates

Owners meetings may have been meant for debate and discussion, but much of the decision making was left to Stern. “I went to every board meeting for five years and it was just amazing to me,” said Pat Croce, former co-owner of the Philadelphia 76ers. “We’d get the agenda, but whatever David wanted to get done, got done. He really cares about fans, too, and will get really radical with owners when he thinks the fans are getting shafted.” Sports Business Daily

Stern was one of the first commissioners to migrate the NBA to cable television while advancing opportunities in the field of digital media. He created NBA.com in 1995, the first league to integrate both team and league websites. The NBA then launched NBA TV in 1999 (then called NBA.com TV), and the league has long embraced various social media channels to drive its brand. “It was David’s vision and his smart, forward thinking that really put Turner on the map,” said David Levy, president of Turner Sports. “He was the only commissioner at the time to look at cable and Turner/ESPN as an option. He put his crown jewels on cable well before any of the other top leagues. He trusted us with the postseason. He trusted us with the All-Star Game. He trusted us with his brand at NBA TV and NBA Digital. These moves were both risky and visionary at the same time.” Sports Business Daily

January 21, 2014 Updates

According to the short-form official rules, the odds of picking a perfect bracket are 1 in 4,294,967,296. How impressive? According to those short-form rules published on the Quicken Loans Facebook page, the contest is open to legal residents of the U.S. 21 years and older. No purchase is necessary. One entry per household. The grand prize will be payable in annual payments of $25 million for 40 years or as a one-time payment of $500 million. There also will be 20 first-place prizes of $100,000 each for the best brackets that are not perfect to use toward buying, refinancing or remodeling a home. Cleveland Plain Dealer

In regard to the potential sale of the Bucks, I have been told there likely will be four serious suitors who’ll be more than happy to do business with long-time Bucks owner Herb Kohl. One is said to be a consortium of five or six individuals who are from Wisconsin or have Wisconsin ties. Because of the delicate nature of the situation, none of the individuals I spoke with would publicly acknowledge their interest in the Bucks. Additionally, a source contends there is an individual from the Chicago area who has made it perfectly clear to Kohl that he’ll buy the franchise whenever the latter desires to sell. This offer, I’ve been told, has been on the table for several years. Racine Journal-Times

Kohl has said he will contribute a “significant” amount to the construction of a new entertainment facility that would not only be home to the Bucks, but also would host other sporting events, concerts and conventions. There is zero doubt in my mind Kohl will keep his word. One person I talked to said Kohl is so obsessed about a new arena being a major piece of his legacy to Milwaukee and Wisconsin that he could make a contribution in excess of $100M toward the project. Asked the odds of a new arena being built, one source replied “70 percent.” Another source close to the Bucks’ situation said “80 percent.” Racine Journal-Times

January 20, 2014 Updates
January 16, 2014 Updates
January 13, 2014 Updates

"We have staff working all day today to make sure this issue doesn't occur again. Our staff worked very efficiently to identify where the leaks were. And we always have staff on hand that are experienced with issues such as this. We also literally had to get atop of the roof outside to see what the issues were. The big freeze this past week might have created a small fissure in roofing materials, and as the rain came on and some ice was melting, some water was able to seep in,"Ted Leonsis wrote on his personal blog. Ted's Take

January 9, 2014 Updates

Alex Jensen knows the Cleveland Cavaliers, who visit EnergySolutions Arena on Friday night. Jensen spent the last two years as the coach in Canton, which is the Cavs’ franchise in the NBA Developmental League. He left the Charge last summer to become a player development assistant for the Jazz. "It really is a first-class organization," Jensen said. "The owner, Dan Gilbert, makes sure you have everything you need. When I was there, they were obviously going through a rebuilding process. But it’s a great practice facility, great people. It’s only a matter of time before they are really good again — year in and year out." Salt Lake Tribune

January 7, 2014 Updates

On Tuesday, the Silnas, the league and the four former A.B.A. teams will announce a conditional deal that will end the Silnas’ golden annuity. Almost. The Silnas are to receive a $500 million upfront payment, financed through a private placement of notes by JPMorgan Chase and Merrill Lynch, according to three people with direct knowledge of the agreement. The deal would end the enormous perpetual payments and settle a lawsuit filed in federal court by the Silnas that demanded additional compensation from sources of television revenue that did not exist in 1976, including NBA TV, foreign broadcasting of games and League Pass, the service that lets fans watch out-of-market games. New York Times

The N.B.A. has long hoped to be released from its financial obligation to Ozzie and Daniel Silna, brothers who owned the Spirits of St. Louis in the defunct American Basketball Association. But it has never been easy. The Spirits were excluded from the 1976 merger of the two leagues. So the Silnas watched unhappily as the New York (now Brooklyn) Nets, the Denver Nuggets, the Indiana Pacers and the San Antonio Spurs were absorbed into the N.B.A. But the Silnas negotiated an astonishing benefit that was critical to the merger: an agreement to be paid one-seventh of the national television revenue that each of the four teams was to receive, as long as the league continued to exist. That amounted to being paid in perpetuity, and so far, the deal has provided the Silnas with about $300 million. New York Times

Still, the league is not getting rid of the Silnas altogether. They will continue to get some television revenue, some of it from the disputed sources named in their lawsuit, through a new partnership that is to be formed with the Nets, the Pacers, the Nuggets and the Spurs, according to the people with knowledge of the agreement. But at some point, the Silnas can be bought out of their interest in the partnership. The Silnas, of course, did not have to settle. They could have continued to make money from the N.B.A., without ever having to invest in players or build an arena. Clearly, their old agreement would have to be honored as long as the N.B.A. continued to exist. New York Times

But there is a reluctance, more by Daniel, 69, than Ozzie, 80, to keep fighting the league, said one of the people who discussed the agreement. Although wealthy people often plan their estates, much of the Silnas’ riches from the N.B.A. is already in family trusts. Bob Costas, the NBC sportscaster who called Spirits games, said in a telephone interview, “My guess is that for the N.B.A., the upside is that in the foreseeable future, there will come a time when they will not have to look at this and blanch and it will be in the past.” New York Times

December 30, 2013 Updates

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