HoopsHype Rules rumors

August 27, 2014 Updates

The NBA is expanding the area that must be clear behind the basket and cutting the number of photographers along the baseline in an effort to improve player safety. The new regulations, calling for an extra foot of open space on both sides of the basket stanchion, were sent to teams Tuesday by league president of operations Rod Thorn and executive vice president of team marketing and business operations Amy Brooks in a memo that was obtained by The Associated Press. ESPN.com

February 25, 2014 Updates

During a sit-down TrueHoop TV interview with our own Henry Abbott, Thorn was asked about the chances that a 4-pointer -- as outlandish as it may seem -- could be brought to the NBA at some point. In a Per Diem column last month, I advocated for the introduction of a 4-point line 28 feet away from the basket. Turns out, Thorn didn't think the advent of a 4-pointer would be outlandish at all. Rather than reflexively squash the radical idea, as you might expect from a 72-year-old NBA lifer who has worn just about every hat in the league, Thorn seemed genuinely intrigued at the notion and revealed that the 4-pointer has "come up" in league discussions. "Oh man," Thorn told Abbott, "Some of the players we have can shoot the ball 30 feet as easily as they can shoot 23, 24 feet." One of those players? Vince Carter. Thorn recalled a moment when he ran the New Jersey Nets from 2000 to 2010 as team president and general manager. As players tend to do at practice, Carter would showcase his shot-making abilities from far, far away. ESPN.com

February 6, 2014 Updates

The outcome of the Los Angeles Lakers' 119-108 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers on Wednesday will not matter in the long run -- both teams were a lousy 16-32 coming into the game -- but it will become a night to remember another way. It was the moment many people in the basketball world first became aware of Rule No. 3, Section I, Part A of the NBA's rulebook. "Each team shall consist of five players. No team shall be reduced to less than five players. If a player in the game receives his sixth personal foul and all substitutes have already been disqualified, said player shall remain in the game and shall be charged with a personal and team foul. A technical foul also shall be assessed against his team. All subsequent personal fouls, including offensive fouls, shall be treated similarly. All players who have six or more personal fouls and remain in the game shall be treated similarly." ESPN.com

Did coach Mike D'Antoni know what was going to happen when Sacre picked up his sixth foul? "Yeah …," D'Antoni said with his voice trailing off and his eyes letting reporters know he wasn't being truthful. "Not really. But it’s a nice rule." "I never knew when you fouled out, you could go back in," 11-year veteran Chris Kaman said. "I never knew that was a rule. So, I had my shoes untied and I was like lying down on the bench because we had like a really long bench. There was like 30 feet of extra space." ESPN.com

October 5, 2013 Updates

New rule for this season: Players can’t run to a place beyond the baseline, out of bounds, and just stand there, as more than a few teams had been doing in recent seasons. Now, the player has to return to the court immediately or his team will lose the ball. The league said upwards of 11 teams had been having players stand out of bounds, possibly to create more space in a 4-on-4 game, with Denver supposedly coming up with the strategy first. New York Daily News

September 29, 2013 Updates
February 28, 2013 Updates

The NBA issued seven flopping violations in the first month of the 2012-13 season and seven in the second month. There were just three flopping violations in the third month of the season, and there have been zero flopping violations in February. "We feel that the new flopping rule is working well," NBA executive vice president of basketball operations Stu Jackson told USA TODAY Sports. USA Today Sports

February 19, 2013 Updates

Jackson: Yes. Basketball is a simple game. Your goal is penetration, get the ball close to the basket, and there are three ways to do that. Pass, dribble and offensive rebound. The easiest one is -- or should be -- the pass. But the new rules allow you to throw more people at post-up players. NBA basketball is a big man's game, and in the past they protected that aspect of the game. Well, those rules went out the window and what they didn't do was consider this: If they're going to continue to allow zone defenses to work and shut down the paint, then they have to put six more seconds on the shot clock. A 30-second clock. But they're so attached to the idea of the 24-second clock that it doesn't happen. SI.com

January 6, 2013 Updates

Calling Thursday’s sideline incident at Madison Square Garden that led to forward Stephen Jackson’s right ankle sprain “a Mayoral mishap,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich called on the NBA to police activity along the league’s sidelines and baselines. “It’s maddening,” Popovich said of the incident in which Jackson lost his balance after running into a waitress during the first quarter of the Spurs-Knicks game. The waitress appeared to be taking an order from New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg. “It’s an accident waiting to happen.” San Antonio Express-News

October 21, 2012 Updates

A league source told Grantland.com that NBA officials warned “about 10” players for flopping, but the league refused to release the names. “Flops have no place in our game — they either fool referees into calling undeserved fouls or fool fans into thinking the referees missed a foul call,” NBA vice president of basketball operations Stu Jackson said in a statement. “Accordingly, both the Board of Governors and the competition committee felt strongly that any player who the league determines, following video review, to have committed a flop should — after a warning — be given an automatic penalty.” Oklahoman

October 20, 2012 Updates

A league source tells Grantland the NBA flop czars have already warned “about 10” players for preseason floppage, though the league won’t publicly release their names. (That will change once the season starts and the shaming begins.) But it’s clear already the league is taking this seriously, and an aggressive early push wouldn’t be a surprise. Grantland

October 17, 2012 Updates

The NBA is taking steps to cut down on pregame handshakes and rituals that have become popular with players in recent years. Starting this season, as soon as player introductions are finished, there will be 90 seconds put on the game clock and teams will be expected to be ready for tipoff after that time. ESPN.com

The guideline will eliminate or severely cut down on the routines players from most teams go through before games, which often include a series of handshakes with their own teammates before greeting opponents. It would also likely legislate out individual rituals like LeBron James' famous chalk toss, which he abandoned last season during the playoffs. ESPN.com

The Miami Heat's Dwyane Wade is one of the league's most active players before tipoff, usually greeting fans on all four sides of the arena, doing pull-ups on the rim and having a series of handshake routines. He said he'll have to adjust to the new rules. "I'll have to take something away for sure. I'm always going to make sure I show love to the fans," Wade said Wednesday in Miami. "There's so many rules, I can't keep up. ... There's no reason to make a big stink. It's their league, it's their rules." ESPN.com

The effects of the NBA's new anti-flopping program are being felt by players even before the program has been fully implemented. Golden State Warriors guard Jarrett Jack indicated that he was among the first NBA players to receive a warning from the league for flopping, tweeting Tuesday, "So I've been warned for flopping hahaha." Jack has made anti-flopping comments in the past, including a tweet during last year's playoffs in which he implored referees to stop falling for the flops of Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin. ESPN.com

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