HoopsHype Salary Cap rumors

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April 26, 2015 Updates
April 23, 2015 Updates

ESPN: In a few years, the salary cap could increase to $100 million. How does that affect the process of putting a roster together? Morey: I think just like every team we got to factor in what the cap in the future is going to do and all our decisions, and obviously those are a little ways away, we’re still focusing on the playoffs. It’s a big part of our planning. The biggest factor with our planning, it’s not only the cap room we have or don’t have, it’s always your cap room or your cap room in relative to others is really what impacts you the most. We do a lot of planning, but right now we’re just focused on the playoffs. ESPN.com

April 20, 2015 Updates

For Aldridge and Gasol, waiting to sign long-term contracts until 2016 could add $50-80 million to the total value of a potential five-year deal under the higher salary cap on the horizon. "If I don't think about it, I don't expect my teammates to think about it," Gasol said. "And if I don't talk about it, I don't expect anybody to talk about it besides you guys [in the media]. It's going to come anyway, just like everything in life. It'll come, and you'll deal with it. You can't worry about things you can't have an impact on just yet because it's just useless." ESPN.com

April 19, 2015 Updates

Stu Jackson is a former NBA head coach and the former executive vice president of the NBA. More recently, he has worked as an analyst on NBA TV. All those jobs make him uniquely qualified to answer a set of questions about the league from the Star Tribune’s Michael Rand: Q There is a lot of talk of “tanking” and teams intentionally losing in the NBA. How much of that do you think is perception and how much is reality? A My view has always been that the perception is greater than the reality with most teams. I think every franchise has reasons why they make certain decisions with their personnel, in terms of managing their salary cap situation to allow for certain trades or free agency, and it really depends on the stage of development respective franchises are in. Those decisions are not the same for everyone. For some it might take on the appearance that a team is tanking when they’re really just managing their own development. Minneapolis Star-Tribune

April 18, 2015 Updates
April 17, 2015 Updates

Sources told ESPN.com that, based on current projections, league officials expect the salary cap to increase from its current $63.1 million figure to $67.1 million next season, $89 million in 2016-17, and $108 million in 2017-18. The jumps represent massive increases largely triggered by the influx of television money that will begin pouring in after the 2015-16 season when the NBA's new nine-year, $24 billion TV deal kicks in. To put it into perspective, the largest salary-cap jump in history is $7 million in one season. ESPN.com

Sources say that the league, though, has been careful to stress to its teams that these are not only mere projections but also contingent on the NBA and its players avoiding a work stoppage after the 2016-17 season. Both sides have the right to opt out of the current labor agreement by Dec. 15, 2016. ESPN.com

Silver also said draft lottery reform is not coming until at least after the 2016-17 season because owners want to see how the significant increase in the salary cap because the new TV deal impacts the construction of teams. "There's still a sense we need to make a change but until we know what the team behavior is going to be with all this new cap room, we hold it and wait and look holistically at the whole system," he said. USA Today Sports

April 15, 2015 Updates

What is the approach heading into the summer? It’s obviously fluid, but what’s the mind-set? Grousbeck: Well, we’ve got a lot of draft picks. Those could be traded. We’ve got a lot of room. Over the next few years, we’ll have a lot of room under the salary cap. Our intention is always to be aggressive and opportunistic in the summer. We don’t want to let a summer go by. The summer of 2007 transformed this franchise, and you never know when the next one will happen. Boston Globe

April 14, 2015 Updates
April 13, 2015 Updates
April 9, 2015 Updates

They made a waiver claim Tuesday on veteran forward Shavlik Randolph, and have been awarded his rights by the NBA. Randolph, however, is not expected to play for the Nuggets. Picking up a player with his salary ($1.227 million) gets the Nuggets much closer to the NBA's salary-cap floor, which is the minimum salary teams are required to have on their books at season's end. The salary-cap floor is $56.759 million. The Nuggets, with Randolph's salary included, come within roughly $600,000 of the salary-cap floor. Randolph, 31, is expected to be released by the Nuggets. If he clears waivers, then the Nuggets have the benefit of keeping the cap hit — and thus their current proximity to the salary floor — while still having a roster spot with which to sign a prospective player, if they choose to do that. In that scenario, the Nuggets could take the prorated salary they would have paid to Randolph for the final week of the season and apply that to whomever they acquire for the remainder of the regular season, which is down to four games. Then, they would have that player on their roster for the summer and into training camp in order to get a good look at him. Denver Post

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