HoopsHype Sam Hinkie rumors

September 29, 2014 Updates
September 4, 2014 Updates

¡Saludos desde España! The 2014 FIBA World Cup began on Saturday, with 24 teams representing 24 nations from across the globe descending upon Spain for a basketball tournament that occurs just once every four years. A total of 45 current NBA players are participating in the event, and 17 more have connections to NBA teams via draft rights. One of those 17 players is Croatian forward Dario Saric, whose rights were acquired by Philadelphia during the 2014 Draft. This week, a five-man Sixers contingent consisting of General Manager Sam Hinkie, head coach Brett Brown, Nerlens Noel, Joel Embiid, and Michael Carter-Williams traveled to Spain to watch the 20-year-old Saric firsthand. "I am proud of the effort our three players – Nerlens, Joel, and Michael – have made to fly to Spain in order to show their support for Dario, another cornerstone of our program," said Coach Brown. "The opportunity for all of us to spend quality time with each other and continue to discuss how we are going to build our program is very exciting. "As a group we are committed to getting this right." NBA.com

August 31, 2014 Updates

Jason Wolf: #Sixers source: Changes coming, "but nothing ridiculous like that." MT @howardeskin: sixers have fired Dir Player Personel & all scouts. Twitter

August 28, 2014 Updates

Sam Hinkie on whether Embiid may play this season: "I don't know at this point. Right now, he's in Philly and visiting with a variety of our medical professionals and going through tests. He'll get a good baseline and then we'll put together a rehab plan. He's still in a boot. He was shooting threes on one leg in our gym [Monday]. I don't know how it will play out. We'll take an approach without knowing where the finish line is. We want to know how we can be sure to put him in a position to have a long NBA career. However long [rehab] takes will be however long it takes. In my experience with this injury, a very reasonable approach that our medical professionals take is to put these hurdles in place for them to rise above and then measure the symptoms and then let's see what happens in the days after. Is there tightness or soreness or swelling? Does the MRI or X-ray show something different? When we set that road map, no one knows [how long it will take]." Philadelphia Inquirer

August 27, 2014 Updates

While developing a popular presence on the internet isn’t necessarily one of the central steps to his recovery, you can still count Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie as one who has “I told him I want him to take over my Twitter account,” Hinkie said on a conference call with media members on Tuesday. “Maybe my followers will pick up. I think I’m at like 20 or so now.” Philadelphia Inquirer

August 26, 2014 Updates
August 1, 2014 Updates

Sixers president Sam Hinkie and head coach Brett Brown do not use the word "tanking" when describing the team's approach, preferring to say the team is rebuilding through player development. Other teams around the NBA don't find the Sixers' use of semantics acceptable. One league executive told CSNPhilly.com’s John Gonzalez that he believes the rule changes will happen this year and said some teams were not very happy with how the Sixers exploited the lottery/tanking rules, and this is the result. CSNPhilly.com

July 31, 2014 Updates

League sources said Wednesday afternoon that the Sixers would not get any sympathy from fellow franchises. That's because for the second straight season, the Sixers are expected to field a roster below NBA standards in order to guarantee losses in hopes of a high draft pick. This tactic, said one Eastern Conference executive, is having "a negative effect on the integrity of the NBA." He believes the proposed new format, which could come to a league vote in the fall, would go a long way in preventing teams from duplicating what the Sixers are doing. Philadelphia Inquirer

The NBA Competition Committee has yet to determine whether it will recommend altering the draft lottery as early as next season in an attempt to dissuade teams like the Philadelphia 76ers from deliberately fielding a non-competitive roster in order to acquire a high draft pick, a change reportedly being pursued by NBA commissioner Adam Silver, according to a league source. USA Today Sports

The 76ers did not respond to a request for comment Wednesday, but a team source said it's "a stretch" to say the club "strongly" opposes changing the lottery odds. "But no team ... that is unlikely to compete for the playoffs would want this. Right?" The proposal "gives more incentive for mid-level teams ... to not stretch for the playoffs," the source said. That's a "tough message on parity." USA Today Sports

July 21, 2014 Updates

Hinkie will generally explain his reasoning after the fact, but steadfastly refuses to tip his hand. The hiding, the silence, it's strategic, of course. "I've been careful, too careful maybe, about trying to not keep the spotlight on me," Hinkie said recently, declining to discuss his upbringing in depth. He doesn't believe his candor would help the 76ers, and he sees little value in rehashing the "Opie Taylor" stories of his youth. "It's not the kind of thing I'm focused on," he said. "I don't have anything to hide, but prefer to shine the spotlight on others." USA Today Sports

Sam, meanwhile, grew to become best friends with the little girl next door, Kimberly Hampton. They were both outstanding students, successful amateur athletes and remained close long after the Hinkies relocated to Marlow, a tiny town about 70 miles southwest of Oklahoma City, when Sam was 10 and his father was promoted to a position that brought him home. Sam had one sibling, who was seven years older. One morning, just weeks after the move, in the midst of his senior year of high school, Bill Hinkie picked up a 12-gauge shotgun, according to public records. Sam Hinkie declines to discuss his brother's death. USA Today Sports

After the tragedy, Hinkie threw himself into schoolwork and athletics, eventually starting at defensive back and point guard for the Marlow High football and basketball teams. He'd often show up at the gym more than once a day, and with whatever spare time he had left, started a lawn care business. He graduated valedictorian. Hinkie once told a classmate at the University of Oklahoma that his exceptional drive stemmed from the fourth grade, when he received a "B" and promised himself it would never happen again. USA Today Sports

While in Houston, Hinkie convinced Rockets owner Leslie Alexander that he could help the NBA franchise improve its decision-making by using more objective analysis. He worked part-time for the Rockets while he finished his graduate work in California, flying back and forth to Houston one day each week. Hinkie's childhood friend, Kimberly Hampton, also was supremely motivated, intelligent and pioneering. As a college senior, she became only the second woman to serve as ROTC battalion commander at Presbyterian College, and went on to become an Army helicopter pilot. On Jan. 2, 2004, Hampton was killed in action in Iraq. USA Today Sports

It's Friday, three days before Carter-Williams is officially named the NBA Rookie of the Year, and Hinkie, his basketball operations staff and scouts are gathered from around the country, wrapping up a week of intensive meetings with a celebratory dinner. Hinkie will return to work at 6:30 the next morning. He often gets by on four hours of sleep a night, and he still has to pack for Sunday, when he'll leave for a week-long scouting trip in Europe, where he'll wake up in a different bed each day. Within the next two weeks, Alison will give birth to twin boys, the couple's third and fourth children. Hinkie will travel to Chicago and Denver, and the Cleveland Cavaliers will beat long odds to win the top overall draft pick in the NBA lottery in New York, dropping the 76ers to third. Hinkie will tell reporters there that in the last 21 days, he's spent just 18 hours at home. USA Today Sports

July 20, 2014 Updates

Hinkie will generally explain his reasoning after the fact, but steadfastly refuses to tip his hand. The hiding, the silence, it's strategic, of course. "I've been careful, too careful maybe, about trying to not keep the spotlight on me," Hinkie said recently, declining to discuss his upbringing in depth. He doesn't believe his candor would help the 76ers, and he sees little value in rehashing the "Opie Taylor" stories of his youth. "It's not the kind of thing I'm focused on," he said. "I don't have anything to hide, but prefer to shine the spotlight on others." USA Today Sports

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