HoopsHype San Francisco rumors

April 25, 2014 Updates

Welts said that the Warriors have also guaranteed that every employee at Oracle will have a chance to transfer their job to the new building, which is eight miles away, across the San Francisco Bay. They've also guaranteed to their season-ticket holders that their seats will be guaranteed in the new arena. "Oracle Arena is the oldest arena in the NBA, and it's served great for 50 years," Welts said. "But there comes a point in time where if we're going to be the franchise that we aspire to be, we're going to need a new playing facility. And in our view, San Francisco is the right place to be if you have the same aspirations we have, to be truly one of the great franchises in sports." ESPN.com

April 22, 2014 Updates

The Golden State Warriors have agreed to terms to buy 12 acres of land in San Francisco's Mission Bay neighborhood to build a new arena. The Warriors announced Tuesday that they would buy the land from salesforce.com. The team was originally hoping to build a new arena on San Francisco's waterfront but those plans faced opposition from critics concerned about traffic, environmental issues and blocked views of the Bay Bridge. The proposed arena will hold about 18,000 seats and the Warriors say it will be privately financed on private land near the San Francisco Giants' ballpark. USA Today Sports

Golden State is targeting the 2018-19 season to open the arena. The team first arrived in San Francisco in 1960 and played its first 11 seasons there before moving to Oakland. USA Today Sports

The Warriors have moved off of their long-stated plans to build an arena at Piers 30/32 in San Francisco and have bought land a little further south. The new spot is not aesthetically ideal—not right on the water, not framed by the Bay Bridge for TV visuals, not where Joe Lacob and Peter Guber held their splashy press conference starring David Stern and Ahmad Rashad two years ago. But the "ideal" spot was Piers 30/32 and several of us have been documenting for years now that the logistics and political hurdles at Piers 30/32 were just too much. Contra Costa Times

Once the Warriors backed away from their stated goal to have the arena completed for the 2017-'18 season, it was inevitable that Lacob and Guber would be looking for alternate sites and that something in the Mission Bay area would be far more logical. I caught up with Lacob on Monday night in Los Angeles, where the Warriors were playing the Clippers in Game 2 of their first-round playoff series. Here is the transcript of the interview: -Q: So you for sure are at the Mission Bay site? This is the final deal for the new Warriors arena? -LACOB: The boats have been burned, that's the way we like to put it. We're definitely doing this and we're very excited about it. Look, I read the piece you did this afternoon--you need to get a little more data. You really do. This is a much, much, much, much more doable site at the end of the day. Contra Costa Times

-Q: Do you have to redesign, go back into the architecture? -LACOB: Yes, but a lot of that has been done, the arena itself will be pretty much the same, we've done all that work. So the external how it looks, that will be redesigned probably to some extent. We haven't really got there yet. We can move at a pretty rapid pace. Contra Costa Times

March 2, 2014 Updates

Q: So where are you spending most of your time these days? Phil Jackson: I spend it in L.A. I split my time, but I spend more of it in L.A. The winter's a little bit daunting in Montana. I'm going up there this week though, this coming week. My youngest son is getting married in June, and he's having a bachelor party up there. They've invited me to the bachelor party. Q: You got invited, huh? That's usually where we keep the dads away. Phil Jackson: I know. He's a different guy, a poet. He teaches at San Francisco, USF, and he just wants to have some elders, so he asked a couple of older guys to come. But he and his twin brother, who's running the thing, went to college in Colorado, so they're very at home on the slopes so they're going up. Their guys, the eight of them or so, not all of them are as efficient or as good on the slopes as they are. USA Today Sports

February 4, 2014 Updates

More than 21,000 signatures were submitted to San Francisco's Department of Elections today in support of a measure for the June ballot that would impose tighter restrictions on waterfront development, including a proposed basketball arena. The initiative would require voter approval for any future waterfront development on city or Port of San Francisco property that would require an increase in existing height limits. The proposal is being brought forth by the Sierra Club and the No Wall on the Waterfront coalition, which last year used the city's referendum process to defeat a luxury waterfront condominium project that was planned at 8 Washington St. San Jose Mercury-News

February 2, 2014 Updates
January 23, 2014 Updates

Warriors owner Joe Lacob finally admitted during a KNBR interview Thursday that plans to play games at a proposed San Francisco waterfront arena starting in 2017 might not be completely realistic. “If everything worked perfectly, our goal was to be in for 2017-18,” Lacob said in an in-studio interview with Gary Radnich and Larry Krueger. “I think that is going to be a challenge. We’re trying. We’re going to keep trying, but we need to do it right. It’s not just about getting it done. It’s about getting it done right. If it takes a year a longer, it takes a year longer. I’m not going to be concerned with that.” San Francisco Chronicle

Another persistent issue with the arena proposal is how to deal with traffic on the Embarcadero. Although the site is in close proximity to BART and Muni, a planned 500-space parking lot on-site would be for VIPs only. The arena could bring an additional 18,000 people to the waterfront on game days. San Francisco Chronicle

November 12, 2013 Updates

Today, on the third anniversary of the team’s “Lacob-Guber Era,” the Golden State Warriors released an updated design of its proposed sports and entertainment pavilion on the San Francisco waterfront. Today, the site is a dilapidated 13-acre pier that’s falling into the Bay. The Warriors would restore the crumbling pier, build a new event pavilion, and create nearly eight acres of new public open space on the waterfront – the equivalent of three new Union Squares. With parks, plazas, and wide-open paths featuring views of the Bay, in “Design 3.0” the open space has grown from half of the project area to 60 percent. The new, slimmed-down design reduces the event center area by over 30,000 square feet, expands total open space by nearly one acre, lowers building heights, and removes 1.3 million cubic feet of volume. NBA.com

Q: On another topic, do you still believe it's doable to build an arena in San Francisco by 2017? A: I do. I'm an optimist. There are people who, from day one, said it's not going to be possible. No one ever said it's going to be easy. Unlike Sacramento, which is getting $300 million in public money, this is a privately financed arena. Not only is it privately financed, but it's costing $200 million more than an equivalent arena somewhere else because we're fixing the foundation, the piers, for the city. So it's literally a gift to the city of San Francisco. This is not just a condominium project or something like that. This is a civic gift, in many ways. It's something that all of the people can use, not just the Warriors. Not everyone is going to agree on this, but we think the majority of San Franciscans support this. To be attacked by someone like Art Agnos, who is a voice of the past . . . to say that we are billionaires trying to take over the city is a joke. That's absurd and it's insulting. What is he trying to do for the city? We're trying to do something positive. It is going to be tough. We're going to have to convince him and others – or outvote them – that what we're doing is in the best interest of the majority of San Franciscans and people of the Bay Area. We're going to try like hell to do it by 2017. But if it takes longer, it takes longer. We want something everyone can appreciate, use and be proud of. Just like the Golden Gate Bridge in the 1930s, nobody wanted it. Now it's a great thing. CSNBayArea.com

September 30, 2013 Updates

Bob Myers has a fabulous job, with a salary that allows him to live anywhere he likes, visit any place he chooses. On this particular day, as soft clouds hover above the Bay Area, the Warriors general manager chooses state prison. He's not alone. Another member of the one-percent club, Warriors coach Mark Jackson, a former NBA star, also arrives at the joint. These two one-percenters are voluntarily rubbing shoulders -- literally -- with men serving time at this world-famous lockup on the north shore of San Francisco Bay. Myers and Jackson and Warriors assistant coach Brian Scalabrine, one year removed from playing in the NBA, are joined by other members of the Warriors organization, including assistant general manager Kirk Lacob, the son majority owner Joe Lacob. Contra Costa Times

May 6, 2013 Updates
January 13, 2013 Updates

The source said the group includes JMA Ventures, the San Francisco investment firm that bought Downtown Plaza last year at a bargain-basement price. Any deal for the Kings would have to be approved by the NBA Board of Governors, and Sacramento officials are hoping to present a credible alternative to Chris Hansen, the hedge-fund manager who wants to buy the team and move it to Seattle. Sacramento Bee

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